All times listed are Central Daylight Time.

EACH COURSE is identified by one of the following terms:

  • ONLINE ONLY: Both the instructor and students will meet online for the class, live via Zoom, in the designated weekly time slot. Sessions will be recorded for review, if desired.
  • HYBRID: The instructor teaches live from the Moss Building. Some students are in the classroom (limited availability), while others Zoom in. When registering, you may select either the IN PERSON or ONLINE version of the class – both options allow students to interact with the instructor.
  • IN PERSON ONLY: The class will take place at the Moss Building. These sessions will not offer online viewing and will not be recorded.

Important Semester Information:

Course listings by day of the week

Select a day of the week below to filter courses. Use Ctrl (⌘) + F on your keyboard or your browser's search function to search the entire page.

Monday Courses

  • Joint Replacement Surgery at Mizzou (10:00 - 11:30 a.m.)
  • Latinos in Missouri: Opportunities, Challenges and Achievements (1:00 - 2:30 p.m.)
  • The Empowered Caregiver (3:00 - 4:30 p.m.)

Joint Replacement Surgery at Mizzou

Mondays: June 3 & 10 (2 sessions)
10:00 - 11:30 a.m.
HYBRID
Semester Course Fee: $20
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

First two weeks of the semester.

June 3: Robotic Assisted Knee Replacement By the Numbers: Novel surgical navigation systems, including robotic surgery platforms, may help to improve the accuracy of knee replacement surgery. In this session, you will learn about robotic-assisted knee replacement surgery and how this technology enables our surgeons to receive enhanced feedback on soft tissue balance around the knee, and how this can help to guide small, incremental changes in component position to restore balance in the ligaments that surround the knee during total knee replacement surgery.

June 10: Hip Replacement Surgery went through a period of innovations during the early 21st century that did not always work as well as expected. This session will present a history of innovation of materials used in hip replacement surgery, including the primary combination of implant components that show promise in making today’s hip replacement a very durable and effective surgery.

Instructor: Dr. James Keeney is a professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Missouri and an experienced knee replacement specialist with over 25 years of focused practice in knee replacement surgery, including more than 3,000 conventional knee replacement surgeries and 200 robotic-assisted knee replacement surgeries.

Latinos in Missouri: Opportunities, Challenges and Achievements

Mondays: June 3, 10, 17, 24 (4 sessions)
1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
HYBRID
Semester Course Fee: $40
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

June 3: MU Extension faculty members Chris Barnett and Elisa Cardenas Oleas, from the Center
for Applied Research and Engagement Systems, will set the stage by providing an overview of “All Things Missouri,” an interactive destination site populated with data sources to serve Missouri residents. Utilizing the All Things site, the instructors will share what information exists to describe some of the who, what and where of data related to our state’s Latino population. In addition, possible limitations to the collection and analysis of information on this complex and lesser understood population will be explored with Osher participants.

June 10: UMKC Extension faculty member Gerardo Martinez will share the work of Alianzas, a program designed to create linkages and intercultural awareness with Extension faculty, staff, and partnering public and private organizations serving the state’s Latino population. Building on his life’s journey and experiences, the instructor will outline examples of strategies in building cultural competency, trust and respect between the general population, educators and organizations that serve this multifaceted population.

June 17: MU Extension faculty and staff Jo Britt-Rankin and Juana Lopez will share experiences in addressing one of Extension’s grand challenges, health and nutrition education, to intergenerational Latino audiences on a statewide basis. Their presentation will address the scope of this statewide effort as well as the challenges associated with delivering these programs. Many educational efforts require the creation and use of written materials to supplement instruction. The instructors will share the program’s approaches to reaching audiences that may have limited reading and writing skills in Spanish as well as English.

June 24: Extension off-campus faculty members Tish Johnson and Lisa Overholser and MU faculty member Laura Gutierrez Perez will explore the cultural, artistic and workforce contributions of Latinos in Missouri through their personal experiences in several ongoing efforts across the state. Included in those celebrations of Latino achievements are the oral traditions of the St. Louis Storytelling Festival, Latino contributions to the Missouri Bicentennial Project and the MU Cambio Center and its annual Cambio de Colores Conference.

The Empowered Caregiver

Mondays: June 3, 10, 17, 24 (4 sessions)
3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
HYBRID
Semester Course Fee: $40
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

This educational series teaches caregivers how to navigate the responsibilities of caring for someone living with dementia.

June 3: Building Foundations of Caregiving explores the role of caregivers and changes they may experience, building a support team and managing caregiver stress. This includes “The 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s” and the overview “Understanding Alzheimer’s and Dementia.”

June 10: Supporting Independence and Communicating Effectively focuses on helping the person living with dementia take part in daily activities, providing the right amount of support and balancing safety and independence while managing expectations. We will also touch on how dementia affects communication, including tips for communicating well with family, friends and health care professionals.

June 17: Responding to Dementia-related Behaviors details common behavior changes and how they are a form of communication, nonmedical approaches to behaviors and recognizing when additional help is needed. This session will also include tips for holiday gatherings and how time changes may impact an individual with dementia.

June 24: Exploring Care and Support Services will discuss how best to prepare for future care decisions and changes, including respite care, residential care and end-of-life care. This will include examining differences in care facilities and how to plan and look for the best fit.

Instructors: Amelia Cottle is a dementia diseases educator/advocate/speaker who holds a “degree” in Alzheimer’s disease. Her current path is to honor the memory of her late husband Brian, who was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease at age 52 and died on June 17, 2017. Since Brian’s death, she has dedicated her time to advocacy and education as well as raising awareness and funds for education, research and support related to Alzheimer’s and dementia. Amelia is also a volunteer patient/caregiver advocate, community educator and support group facilitator.

Teresa Brown is a program manager for the Alzheimer’s Association. In her words, “Alzheimer’s disease has touched my family twice that I am aware of. Both instances have left me profoundly changed and wanting to provide a light to others who find themselves on the journey. Through my role with the Alzheimer’s Association, I work to elevate awareness and education of dementia through the range of services offered via the association.”

 

Tuesday Courses

  • Four of Alfred Hitchcock’s Best Films (9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.)
  • Novel Novels (1:00 - 2:30 p.m.)
  • Baseball Bull Session (1:00 - 2:30 p.m.)
  • What’s There to Know About Books? A Look at Materials, Writing and Preservation (3:00 - 4:30 p.m.)

Four of Alfred Hitchcock’s Best Films

Tuesdays: June 4, 11, 18, 25 (4 sessions)
9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
IN PERSON ONLY
Semester Course Fee: $40
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

This is a three-hour class.

When Alfred Hitchcock emigrated to the United States in 1939, he was a well-respected British suspense/thriller director. But in America, in partnership with legendary movie producer David O. Selznick, Alfred Hitchcock quickly rose to worldwide fame. In this course, we’ll view and discuss four of the films that made him famous. Each week, we will have a short presentation about one of the films, then watch the full-length movie on DVD in the Moss building, followed by an open discussion of the film. Feel free to bring in snacks and drinks to enjoy during the movie.

June 4: The very first film Hitchcock directed in America, “Rebecca,” featuring Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine, won multiple Academy awards, including Best Picture of the Year for 1940. This atmospheric murder mystery is based on the novel by Daphne Du Maurier.

June 11: Later in 1940, Hitchcock’s underappreciated suspense and anti-war film “Foreign Correspondent” was released. The film stars Joel McCrae and Laraine Day and features what were to become the classic elements of the Hitchcock style.

June 18: The 1945 Hitchcock film “Spellbound” is one of the best psychological thrillers ever made. The film stars Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck, with surreal images based on designs by Salvador Dali. The final plot twist is unforgettable.

June 25: “Notorious” in 1946 teamed Ingrid Bergman with Cary Grant in a suspenseful spy thriller with extraordinary cinematography. The Bergman/Grant chemistry works beautifully even though Grant is playing against type as the untrustworthy spy T. R. Devlin.

Instructor: Mike Trial graduated from the University of Missouri in 1969. He served in the army, then worked for 30 years as a civil engineering manager at various locations in the U.S. and overseas. He now lives on the family tree farm near Columbia, MO.

Novel Novels

Tuesdays: June 4, 11, 18, 25 (4 sessions)
1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
IN PERSON ONLY
Semester Course Fee: $40
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

Limit of 25 students.

In this class, we will explore three selections of contemporary literature where the authors chose to deviate from the standard formats we have grown to expect. Each of our fictional selections were written within the last 20 years. Participants will be given study guides ahead of time should they wish to start their reading before the class begins. No previous experience with literature study is required; come only with an open mind and a desire to learn something new.

The first session will encompass an introduction to literary techniques applicable to the books. Then we’ll focus on the following books: A Little Hope by Ethan Joella (session two), Trust by Hernan Diaz (session three), and Star of the Sea by Joseph O’Connor (session four). All books are readily available for purchase or through the Daniel Boone Regional Library.

Instructor: Victoria Hubbell has spent her career teaching reading and writing at all levels, spurred by her personal love of doing both. Dr. Hubbell enjoys researching for her classes almost as much as she enjoys welcoming students into the world of literature.

Baseball Bull Session

Tuesdays: June 4, 11, 18, 25 (4 sessions)
1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
HYBRID
Semester Course Fee: $40
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

This class is truly a bull-session about baseball that involves a panel of five baseball lifers enjoying a give-and-take with the class members, both in-house and remote, about a variety of baseball questions. The goal of the class is to involve everyone, including the panel, in looking at America’s Game, past, present and future.

Instructors: The moderator will be Bill Clark, a 36-year veteran Major League Baseball scouting supervisor, including a dozen years as an international director. The panel will include John Kelly, longtime Hickman High athletic director; Terry Farmer, baseball card historian; Hank Landry, retired professor who’s steeped in baseball lore; and Dr. Sid Christiansen, who’s attended hundreds of MLB games and has the ticket stubs to prove it.

What’s There to Know About Books? A Look at Materials, Writing and Preservation

Tuesdays: June 4, 11, 18, 25 (4 sessions)
3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
HYBRID
Semester Course Fee: $40
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

Books are part of our everyday lives, but they weren’t always so commonplace, and they didn’t always look the way they do now. Join librarians and archivists from the Division of Special Collections and Archives at the University of Missouri Libraries for a look at how books and writing have evolved over the last 4,000 years. The first two sessions will provide an in-depth look at the writing materials and processes used in ancient Mesopotamia, ancient Egypt and medieval Europe. Attendees will get an introduction to printing techniques and technologies in the third session, including letterpress printing, relief illustration and engraving. Each session will incorporate hands-on activities so that attendees can practice historical techniques and gain an understanding of how book production has changed. The fourth session will feature an introduction to how MU’s librarians and archivists preserve various types of materials, including books, papers and photographs. Overall, the course will provide a broad understanding of the materials and techniques of book production through the centuries as well as practical tips attendees can use to preserve their personal books and papers.

Instructors: Kelli Hansen is Head of Special Collections at the University of Missouri Libraries. She holds an M.A. in art history from the University of Missouri and an M.S.I.S. from the University of Texas at Austin.

John Henry Adams is the Research and Instruction Librarian for Special Collections.

Michaelle Dorsey is the Preservation Librarian for Special Collections.

Anselm Huelsbergen is University Archivist and Technical Services Archivist in University Archives at MU.

 

Wednesday Courses

  • Open Window Writing and Meditation (9:30 – 11:00 a.m.)
  • PTS-D: Thinking About an Evolved Definition and Effective Ways to Treat It (1:00 – 2:30 p.m.)
  • Sherlock’s Science (3:00 – 4:30 p.m.)

Open Window Writing and Meditation

Wednesdays: June 5, 12, 26 (3 sessions)
9:30 - 11:00 a.m.
ONLINE ONLY
Semester Course Fee: $30
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

Limit of 50 students. No class on Wednesday, June 19.

Would you like to cultivate the gift of insight, feel nourished by nature and make authentic connections? Discover that sweet space inside where peace and inner knowing reside. Imagine the feeling of a cool morning breeze, golden sunshine on your face, listening to the sound of birdsong as you sit in front of your open window looking out at the trees, a blanket draped across your shoulders, sipping a cup of your favorite tea, writing and meditating, nice and cozy in the comfort of your own home… while also sitting in community. This online course will help you get in touch with your inner wisdom; cultivate concentration, calm and clarity; start your day in a blissful state of mind; and feel nurtured by nature and a sense of community. This is a program based on process, not product. This is a participatory class, and the instructor will ask that you keep your camera on during the full Zoom session.

Instructor: Suzanne Norton is a writer, teacher, mother and nature-lover who is currently working on her first book, a memoir entitled Journey Towards Home. Through Mindful Practices, her online business for women over 50, she offers programs and private sessions focused on mindful writing, meditation and yoga. Suzanne’s path of self-discovery continues to expand through the study and practice of Buddhism, yogic philosophy, meditation, writing and various forms of creativity.

PTS-D: Thinking About an Evolved Definition and Effective Ways to Treat It

Wednesdays: June 5, 12, 26 (3 sessions)
1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
HYBRID
Semester Course Fee: $30
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

No class on Wednesday, June 19.

War veterans (and those surviving other types of intense trauma, both physical and psychological) have experienced post-trauma symptoms since humankind first faced various threats. Yet it wasn’t until after the Vietnam conflict that what we now refer to as post-traumatic stress disorder was named, defined and codified. This first appeared in the 1980 publication of the DSM-III, the primary diagnostic manual of mental health professions. But it is possible that some of our efforts have further traumatized and limited the recovery of those who suffer symptoms.

This Osher class is based in research and also extends into speculation as to how post-traumatic stress disorder is established in an individual and how it can be most effectively treated. The course will propose a modified and perhaps more serviceable definition and explore various options for treatment. The course will examine physiological brain function and psychological loss of identity as two primary contributors to post-traumatic stress symptoms, and it will examine treatment alternatives to calm the brain and to construct a new identity after trauma.

Instructor: Cindy Claycomb is a licensed psychologist retired from clinical practice.

Sherlock’s Science

Wednesdays: June 5, 12, 26 (3 sessions)
3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
ONLINE ONLY
Semester Course Fee: $30
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

No class on Wednesday, June 19.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was a not-too-successful ophthalmologist who, by the end of his life, was hornswoggled into supporting the veracity of photographs of fake fairies. But he gave the modern world its best known fictional example of a genius, a character who has long outlived his creator. Was Sherlock Holmes the world’s first consulting detective? Detectives in both literature and life appeared before he did, and we’ll investigate their influence on him and his creator. Were his methods as extraordinary as he was? We’ll examine his use of magnifying glasses and how he employed them and other forensic tools on hair, fingerprints and typewritten messages. Was his logic beyond the grasp of most mortals, or do we just need to brush up on how to construct a deductive proof? We’ll interrogate expert witnesses from the Victorian era into the 21st century to see if Sherlock was reflecting detective reality or creating it. Come to 221B Baker Street, pull up a comfy chair and join the Osher Irregulars as we delve into “The Case of the Prescient Polymath.”

Instructor: Rebecca DeNeve spent her professional life shuttling between two cultures — the law and literature — as a legal editor, legislative analyst and an instructor in literature and composition at Columbia College’s Jefferson City campus. She maintains a lifelong interest in the juncture of literature and science.

 

 

Thursday Courses

  • Planning to Achieve Peace of Mind (10:00 – 11:30 a.m.)
  • The Changing World of Romance Publishing (3:00 – 4:30 p.m.)

Planning to Achieve Peace of Mind

Thursdays: June 6, 13, 20, 27 (4 sessions)
10:00 - 11:30 a.m.
HYBRID
Semester Course Fee: $40
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

Get organized. Increase your confidence. Update your knowledge. Be prepared for the unexpected. These four sessions, enhanced by a panel of local experts, will explore a number of topics relevant to both the current and soon-to-be retiree. Both novice and advanced learners can find common ground with usable and practical information. Achieve peace of mind by preparing for the unexpected, allowing for the full enjoyment of retirement years. Bring your list of questions as we delve into topics, such as organizing your important documents, retirement income (including Social Security and IRAs) and taxes, investment management, estate planning, charitable and legacy giving, and trust administration.

Instructor: Scott Yost has 30 years of financial, legal and fiduciary experience. An alumnus of Saint Louis University, Scott received a Master of Laws from Washington University School of Law and Juris Doctor from Saint Louis University School of Law. He is credentialled as a Certified Exit Planner (CExP) and a Registered Corporate Coach (RCC) in addition to holding his Missouri law license, Missouri CPA license, and the designation of Certified Trust and Fiduciary Advisor (CTFA).

Panelists: Rosie Inslee serves as a private wealth strategist, where her passion for building relationships, taking care of families and making a difference in the lives she touches is an outgrowth of her prior roles as banker, writer, administrator, community volunteer and mother. An MU alumna, Rosie enjoys writing, being outdoors and giving her time to a variety of nonprofits, such as United Way, Assistance League, Special Olympics and the Down Syndrome Guild.

Kim Whorton has over 30 years of banking experience, with 24 in wealth management. Kim specializes in estate planning and settlement, working alongside clients to help plan their future goals and wealth transfer. Kim holds a B.S. in Business from Columbia College, graduated from the Cannon Trust School in 2013, and holds the designation of Certified Trust and Fiduciary Advisor (CTFA). She is a member of the Mid-Missouri Estate Planning Council.

David Abbott has over 34 years of experience in the financial services industry. He has served as an investment portfolio manager as well as vice president of investments, with $6.6 billion under management. David earned both a Master of Business Administration, with a concentration in Finance, and his Bachelor of Agricultural Economics from MU. David is a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) charterholder and a member of the CFA Institute.

Sabrina McDonnell, a lifelong community banker, returned to Columbia in early 2023. She has more than 30 years of experience in the financial services industry, having served as a director of private wealth markets, chief customer experience officer and bank president. McDonnell holds a B.A. from Drury University, a specialty certificate from the Graduate School of Banking-Wisconsin, an MBA from the University of Missouri, and the Certified Trust and Fiduciary Advisor (CTFA) designation.

The Changing World of Romance Publishing

Thursdays: June 6, 13, 20, 27 (4 sessions)
3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
HYBRID
Semester Course Fee: $40
Premium Members: Unlimited classes; no additional fees

Year after year, the biggest selling fiction genre is romance. What is it about these relationship-oriented stories that generate such devoted fans? This class will look at the state of romance publishing today, with a look at the roots of the genre. Recent issues that have caused dissent among authors and readers include diversity, book piracy, audiobooks, new trends in publication and artificial intelligence. It is clear that the face of romance writing is changing. Will the genre maintain its dominance in book sales? How do the trends affect readers? Join a lively examination and discussion of the past, present and future of romance writing.

Instructor: Diane K. Peterson is a retired school library media specialist who promotes the romance novel industry as an analyst, speaker and reviewer. She is the historian for the Romance Writers of America and regularly contributes her research to the RomanceWiki. She also teaches online classes for authors on topics such as Goodreads and romance history.

 

Friday Value-Added Courses

  • Potpourri of the Arts (9:30-11:00)
  • Brown Bag Seminar Series (11:30-1:00)

Friday sessions are free of charge to all current Osher members: Premium, Semester and Basic. Sessions marked as HYBRID will allow participants to choose whether they attend via Zoom or in person.


Potpourri of the Arts

Fridays; 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Each semester, Osher invites the movers and shakers of mid-Missouri’s arts scene to discuss, display, perform and showcase their work. Join us for this grab bag of arts topics.


June 7: Friday Morning Book Talk with Authors Julie Chappell and Hank Jones
HYBRID

Julie Chappell, former professor of medieval and early modern English literature, has published six books of scholarship and several books of poetry, including Faultlines: One Woman’s Shifting Boundaries, and collected short stories, including Mad Habits of a Life, nominated for the Paterson Poetry Prize. She represents the state of Oklahoma in Poets Building Bridges, a worldwide Zoom event.

Hank Jones, an avid hiker, is a poet and the author of Too Late for Manly Hands. He is a faculty member at Tarleton State University in Stephenville, Texas.

June 14: All Things Firefly Music Festival 2024
ONLINE ONLY

The Missouri Symphony’s (MOSY’s) executive director Trent Rash and music director Wilbur Lin will guide participants through this year’s Firefly Music Festival. An examination of the pieces, composers, historical context, and more, will be considered to help those attending the concerts be active listeners and participants in each concert this summer.

Instructors: Trent Rash serves as the executive director of The Missouri Symphony. Trent previously was an assistant professor of music and musical theatre at Stephens College. He serves on the boards
of the Quorus and Landlocked Opera and as a cochair of the Columbia Chamber of Commerce small business committee. Trent enjoys collecting bow ties and fun socks, singing karaoke, reading and running.

Wilbur Lin is the music director of the MOSY. Known for his creative programming and inviting stage
presence, Wilbur’s career has taken him to orchestra halls and opera theaters across the U.S., Europe, Latin America and Taiwan.

June 21: The Puzzle of Abstract Painting
HYBRID

Abstract painting is now more than a century old, yet observers are often bewildered by nonobjective art. What do these paintings signify? What do they mean, if anything? Artist John Fennell paints both
landscapes and abstract images and will explain his approach to abstract painting, why after years of
painting landscapes he has incorporated abstraction in his work, the relationship of abstraction to music and how to look for and find meaning in an art form that changed the course of the history of art.

Instructor: John Fennell has been a painter for 40 years. He attended Northern Illinois University, the American Academy of Art and earned a master’s degree in art from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He has exhibited in many midwestern cities, and his work is in many private collections. An emeritus professor at the Missouri School of Journalism, he taught magazine writing, publishing and design. As a journalist, he assisted Pulitzer Prizewinning columnist Mike Royko, was editor of an
international design journal and editor-in-chief of an award-winning city magazine.

June 28: Flemish, Spanish and French Paintings from the Baroque Era
ONLINE ONLY

The Baroque era of Western art is generally considered to comprise the 17th century. This session will feature paintings from 17th-century Flemish artists (Rubens, van Dyck, Jordaens and Sweerts), Spanish artists (Velázquez, Zurbarán, de Ribera and Murillo), and French artists (Poussin, Lorrain, de La Tour, Le Nain and Moillon). In addition to discussing individual styles and contributions, we will note the different ways artists visually represented similar subjects and themes and depicted contemporary life and beliefs.

Instructor: Robin Blake is a docent at the MU Museum of Art and Archeology. He and his wife Cokie have provided numerous Osher presentations on art history, and she will assist with this one.

Brown Bag “Lunch and Learn” Seminar Series

Fridays; 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Brown Bag seminars are open to all Osher Premium and Basic members throughout the academic year. Semester members may attend for the semester in which they enroll. Feel free to nosh on your lunchtime treats (with or without your camera on!) during this “lunch and learn.”


June 7: CoMo Roller Derby: A Crash Course
HYBRID

In this session, Columbia, Missouri’s very own roller derby team players will present a crash course in roller derby, including the history of the sport, its resurgence, the current iteration of the game, the role of roller derby in communities and how you can become involved as a player, official, volunteer,
spectator or community partner.

Instructors: Aly Wright (she/her), current chair of CoMo Roller Derby’s Coaching Committee, and Kat
Wright (she/they), current chair of COMO Roller Derby’s (CMRD’s) Beginners Committee. Other players may be present for demonstration purposes.

June 14: Sundown Towns: Exclusion, Racism and White Supremacy
HYBRID

A “sundown town” is a place where there was a written or unwritten “rule” that people of a certain group––generally African Americans––were not allowed to be within the city limits after sunset. Intimidation and violence as well as word of mouth enforced these rules. Many Missouri towns, including Eldon, Ferguson, Linn, Savannah, Blue Springs, Branson and Concordia, were sundown towns. Based on Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism by James W. Loewen (author of Lies My Teacher Told Me), this talk will discuss their history and sociology as well as their effects on the people who were excluded and the White inhabitants. How to remedy this problem will also be discussed.

Instructor: Professor emeritus of cultural diversity Nancy F. Browning taught “Cultural Diversity in
Modern America” to thousands of students at Lincoln University. In her retirement, she teaches and attends Osher classes and facilitates the Social Justice Book Club. Nancy edits scientific grants and papers
for an international clientele and writes children’s books. She enjoys reading, walking, singing, quilting and other needlework as well as spending time with friends, family and her cat Mili.

June 21: Understanding Missouri Elections in 90 Minutes or Less
HYBRID

Can we trust election results? How do I know my ballot was counted? What makes absentee voting different than voting on Election Day? Explore the answers to these questions and more as we learn about how elections are run in Missouri. This course focuses on the logistics of how county offices prepare for and administer each election. Beginning with the foundation of the election––voter registration––we’ll explore how election administrators support Missouri voters as they participate in our democracy.

Instructor: Brianna Lennon serves as the county clerk for Boone County, Mo. She previously worked in the Missouri Secretary of State’s Office as deputy director of elections and elections counsel and holds a law degree and master’s in Public Policy from the University of Missouri. Brianna is also a Certified Elections/Registration Administrator (CERA) through the National Association of Election Officials.

June 28: Ginger Rogers: Dress for Success Exhibit – Visit to the State Historical Society of Missouri
IN PERSON ONLY

Join us for a guided tour of the Ginger Rogers: Dress for Success exhibit at the State Historical Society of Missouri (605 Elm Street, Columbia, MO 65201). Nicole Johnson, curator of the Missouri Historic Costume and Textile Collection and instructor in MU’s Department of Textile and Apparel Management (TAM), and Mackenzie Miller, doctoral candidate at TAM and recipient of the Piper Distinguished Doctoral Fellowship, will walk us through this costume collection of Academy-Award winning performer and Missouri native Ginger Rogers. The exhibit includes contemporary apparel designed by MU undergraduate students inspired by the collection. Limited seating will be available in the exhibit rooms during the program