New Members Elected to University Extension Council

Congratulations are extended to one new council member and three returning members who were elected to the Phelps County University of Missouri Extension Council following elections held countywide on January 22-26, 2018.

New Council members are as follows:
Gary O’Day
Daniel Oerther
Anastasia Ratliff
Marla Striped Face-Collins

New Council members will serve a two-year term, effective March 1, 2018.

University of Missouri Extension aims to extend the education and information resources available through the University of Missouri to members of the local community. Council members play an important role in this process guiding the direction that programming takes in the county. The Phelps County Extension Council meets at 6 pm on the second Monday of the month (April-September) and 7 pm (May-August) at the Extension center. Meetings are open to the public. 

The Phelps County University of Missouri Extension office has professional staff available to assist you with questions in the fields of horticulture, family finance, health & nutrition, business development, youth development. Requests for information can be directed to Phelps County University of Missouri Extension, 200 North Main Street, Rolla, MO 65401, Phone 573-458-6260, or phelpsco@missouri.edu

Upcoming Events:

Phelps County Quarterly Calendar of Events

Gardening Calendar

      - February
      - March

Evening with Nature

The Meramec Hills Chapter of the Missouri Master Naturalists will host “Evening with Nature” on Tuesday, March 13 from 5:30 – 8:30 pm at Rolla Middle School.  The event is free and open to the public.


Growing Green Seminar

There will be more than 20 different topics to choose from including Missouri’s Water Resources, Vegetable Gardening, Sustainable Landscaping, Roof-top Gardening, Seed Starting, Fruit Trees, Right Plant; Right Place, Native Plants for Wildlife and Grazing, Lasagna Gardening, Soil Basics, Healthy Soil-Healthy Plants, Rain Gardens, Horizontal Bee Hives, Plant Propagation, Greenhouse Construction, Garden Cover Crops, Flowerbeds and Ground Covers, Front Yard Forestry, Greenhouse Plants, Healthy Stream Ecosystems, Getting Started with Herbs, Successfully Growing Grapes, and many more.

QuickBooks Classes Being Offered This Spring

Business people who want to learn QuickBooks have several opportunities to take a class this spring through a program offered by the Small Business and Technology Development Center (SBTDC) at Missouri University of Science and Technology, Missouri Chamber Foundation and Rolla Technical Institute (RTI). Classes are taught by a certified Quick Books instructor.

 

All classes will be held at RTI, 1304 E 10th Street, Rolla, MO. Class time for each class is from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Cost for each class is $79. Registration and prepayment is required. Register online: www.rollaclasses.com, call:  (573) 458-0150 or in-person at RTI, 1304 E 10th St., Rolla, MO.

Managing Forest Resources: Timber Stand Improvement, Forest Farming and Mushroom Cultivation

Resources for Your Flooded Home

Cleaning up after a flood takes special care. To help with your flood response and recovery, download MU Extension Publication MP904,  Resources for Your Flooded Home (PDF). This guide covers a variety of flood cleanup topics. Other flood related resources can be found here.

Time to get the pressure gauge on your canner checked

When you plant your garden, it’s so easy to imagine all of the great-tasting, healthy food that will come from those tiny seeds and plants. You may be one of the people that grow not only enough to eat during the summer but extra so it can be preserved for cold winter nights. Now is a great time to make sure your canning gear is ready for production when your garden starts producing more than you can eat.

The dial gauge on your canner should be tested every year to assure it is processing foods at the correct temperature. The dial gauge registers the pressure in the canner. The pressure is an indicator of the temperature of the inside of the canner. It is important for low acid foods to be processed at 240 degrees Fahrenheit to destroy the spores of Clostridium Botulinum, the bacteria that causes botulism.

Phelps County University of Missouri Extension can check your pressure gauge in just a few minutes. This service is provided for a fee of $1.

If you are looking for information on how to preserve your fresh vegetables, University of Missouri Extension has up to date information on how to safely can foods. You can download them at http://extension.missouri.edu/explore/hesguide/foodnut. The Quality for Keeps series is all about home food preservation.  

Soil Testing

Don’t guess. Soil tests save time and money.

Soil testing is the best guide to the wise and efficient use of fertilizer and soil amendments, said Manjula Nathan, director of the University of Missouri Extension Soil Testing and Plant Diagnostic Services.

Whether you grow acres of row crops or have a vegetable patch in the backyard, a soil test will provide you with an analysis of nutrients and a set of recommendations for any improvements.

“We frequently get questions from customers like, ‘I apply fertilizer every year. How come my plants are not doing well?’” Nathan said.

“Most of the time the problem is they never have done a soil test, but have been guessing on fertilizer requirements,” she said. “They do not realize that by guessing they are wasting money by over- or under application, and the excess fertilizer can end up in streams, ponds and underground water, polluting the environment.” 

Soil testing can be done through the extension office. The cost is $15 per sample and mailed to the lab every Friday with a turn around time of about two weeks. Soil testing publications

Soil Sampling Questions and Answers (PDF)

What is an Extension Center? Brochure (PDF)

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