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Your community classroom

MU Extension is the University of Missouri’s classroom in Randolph County. We connect people to research-based education to enrich the quality of life and enhance the economic well-being of our communities. MU Extension in Randolph County is your one-stop source for practical education and information on almost anything.

MU Extension partners with the Randolph County Commission and other local organizations to provide education, information and services that meet people’s needs. The elected and appointed members of the Randolph County Extension Council provide guidance in identifying those needs to ensure that our educational programs are relevant, reliable and responsive. 4-H, Excel, Master Gardeners, and FCE all work with Extension.

Whether it’s resources for yourself or your family, farm, business or community, we invite you to explore our website, call or email to learn how we can help you.

Pesticide collection for Missouri farmers and households

September 19 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the Charles Krueger – Public Works Complex, 2001 North Osteopathy in Kirksville. Items accepted are pesticides, fungicides, rodenticides, insecticides, herbicides, dewormers, fertilizers containing herbicide or pesticides, and fly tags. For more information, see the flyer at http://extension.missouri.edu/adair/documents/Ag/Kirksville.pdf

AgrAbility Project

The purpose of the AgrAbility Project is to help increase the likelihood that farmers, ranchers, farm workers, and farm family members who are limited by any type of disability or chronic health condition employed in production agriculture or agriculture-related occupations become more successful. It’s about cultivating success in agriculture, employment, and rural life for people with disabilities and their families. The AgrAbility mission is to enhance and protect quality of life and preserve livelihoods. The AgrAbility philosophy represents the very ideals that define American agriculture. It’s about supporting and promoting growth and independence. It’s about no-limit thinking and the can-do spirit. Ultimately, AgrAbility is all about hope! AgrAbility links the Extension service at a land-grant university with a nonprofit disability service organization to provide practical education and direct assistance that promotes rural independence. Our staff offers practical solutions to individuals who work on small or large operations as well as services to hobby, part-time, farm workers, or seasonal operators. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, administers the AgrAbility Project.    

Preserve it Fresh, Preserve it Safe!

May/June 2015 Preserve it Newsletter (PDF)

Ergot

Ergot, caused by the fungus Claviceps puprurea, is a disease of cereal crops and grasses. The disease causes reduced yield and quality of grains and hay and also causes a livestock disease called ergotism, if infected grains or hay are fed. The most common sign of ergot is the dark purple to black sclerotia (ergot bodies) found replacing the grain in the heads of cereals and grasses just prior to harvest. Ergot is toxic to animals.

Wild for Monarchs

Plant a Native butterfly garden or Monarch Waystation and create your own moments to remember. Click to view a brochure of what to plant for Monarchs in your garden. (PDF)

Reduced-cost farm energy audits available through MU Extension

Are you thinking about replacing your grain dryer with a more energy-efficient model? Or installing an alternative-energy system? Have an energy audit before making a big investment in energy efficiency on your farm, says University of Missouri Extension specialist Don Day.Farms and rural small businesses can receive energy audits at a reduced rate through MU Extension. Ordinarily, audits cost $450, but a grant from USDA Rural Development will cover 75 percent, lowering the price to $112.50.An energy audit can help determine what upgrades will bring the biggest cost savings, Day said.An energy audit is also required if you intend to apply for incentives through USDA Rural Development’s Rural Energy for America Program (REAP).Grants are available for up to 25 percent of the cost of a renewable energy or energy efficiency project. REAP also provides loan guarantees for up to 75 percent of a project’s cost.Eligible energy systems include solar, wind, geothermal, anaerobic digesters and renewable biomass. Energy efficiency improvements include grain drying and handling, lighting, refrigeration, heating and cooling upgrades, and motor replacements.Missouri has almost $2 million in grant funding available for REAP. To be eligible, at least 50 percent of a farm’s gross income must come from agricultural operations, and small businesses must be in an area with a population under 50,000.

For more information about MU Extension energy audits, contact your local extension office at 660-269-9656. To learn more about REAP, go to http://1.usa.gov/1FDLl1W.

2015 Regional Grazing Schools

 

Missouri Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Program

The Show Me Select Replacement Heifer Program is focused entirely on Missouri's farmers and is dependent upon active participation from regional extension livestock specialists and local veterinarians, each of which are critical components of the agricultural sector of this state. This program is unique in that it is first and foremost, an educational program targeted at improving production efficiency through increased use of existing technology, coupled with the marketing component. To find more information about this program visit the Missouri Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Program website.

 

Fruit Spray Schedules for the Homeowner

Fruit plantings can be a source of beauty as well as fresh produce. However, for the inexperienced grower, they also can be a source of frustration and expense. Nursery catalogs are full of brightly colored advertisements depicting bountiful harvests of unblemished fruit. Harvests like these are possible, but only with careful selection of the fruit cultivar (cultivated variety) and diligent pest management. Weather conditions in Missouri , such as high humidity, abundant rainfall and warm temperatures, increase disease and insect populations. With few exceptions, home fruit plantings require treatment with pesticides to control a variety of serious diseases and insect pests. Pesticides needed and frequency of application depend on the cultivars planted, location of the planting, weather conditions and cultural practices.

Preserving food from the garden

Food preservation is more than just canning. It includes freezing and drying. Many fruits are commonly frozen for easy access far beyond the productive period of the plant. Click here to view many different publications on food preserving. Food preservation publications

Fire Blight

Fire blight is a bacterial disease affecting apple, crabapple, pear, hawthorn, pyracantha (firethorn) and related species. The bacteria commonly overwinter in cankers (sunken diseased areas) on the tree, which produce a sticky exudate in early spring.The bac­teria are usually spread from the cankers by insects and by wind-blown rain. Careless pruning practices may also spread the bacteria. Click here to learn what you can do to stop this disease.

Missouri Century Farm Program

If your farm has been in your family since Dec.31,1915, you can apply to have it recognized as a Missouri Century Farm. To qualify, farms must meet certain guidelines. Get those guidelines and more information at http://extension.missouri.edu/centuryfarm/home.aspx

 

Get Your Soil Tested by the University of Missouri Extension

Why should you have your soil tested?

  • Soil conditions have a big effect on plant health
  • pH and nutrient levels can change over time
  • You may be over-fertilizing your lawn or garden
  • Testing is the only way to tell which nutrients might be missing

For more information please contact our office at 660-269-9656

 

Journal Your Garden

The most challenging aspect of successful gardening just might be the difficulty recalling what worked and what didn't from year to year. Many gardeners believe the keys to successful gardening are getting your plans on paper first and keeping good records. MU Extension publication MP928, From Seed to Harvest and Beyond: Garden Journal and Calendar, gives you an easy way to record your garden plans, observations and ideas.

Written by MU Extension horticulture specialists who teach Master Gardeners, this publication brings you reliable and relevant information. It also includes year-round resources to guide gardeners at all experience levels.

Order today at http;//extension.missouri.edu/mp928.

Emerald Ash Borer Beetle

Are your Ash trees dying? A small green beetle could be the culprit. The Emerald Ash Borer Beetle is a small metallic green beetle, 1/2 inch long. It is native to Asia and attacks only ash trees. The beetles leave small, D-shaped holes on the trunk. The larvae feed under bark, cutting off the flow of water and nutrients to the tree. They travel in infested firewood and nursery stock. If you believe your Ash Tree is infested with the EAB, call a certified arborist or forester for help. Visit the Missouri Department of Conservation Web site for tips on how to hire a qualified professional in your area. For more information about EAB and other tree pests, visit the following cooperative Web site: www.eab.missouri.edu