Daytime Cooling Centers (PDF)

The places listed on the Daytime Cooling Center document have agreed to provide space for anyone needing relief from the heat during usual daytime open hours of business.

 

Coping With Summer Heat

The heat of a Missouri summer not only can make for high utility bills, but also can be deadly. Here are some tips to help keep you comfortable, healthy and penny-wise.

Help your air conditioner help you

  • Install window air conditioners snugly. Insulate spaces around air conditioners for a tighter fit.
  • Plug up all cracks and spaces around room air conditioners to keep out the hot, humid air. Caulk and weatherstrip your home — heat goes where it's cooler and that's inside your house.
  • If you have central air, set your thermostat no lower than 78 degrees F.
  • If you want to set your thermostat above 78 degrees F, you will adjust more easily to a gradual change; move it up one degree a week until it is at 82 degrees F.
  • Change or clean your air-conditioning filter once a month.

Control indoor air humidity

If your home is not air-conditioned, use moving air to beat the heat

  • Open all your windows early in the morning to get rid of heat and help cool the home.
  • When the temperature begins to rise, close the house. Block the sun from coming in by using awnings and solar screens. Reflect the sun away with aluminum foil or roller shades. Often you can keep this coolness until late afternoon.
  • Keep the house closed during the hottest time of day. Check your indoor and outdoor thermometers to make sure that the indoor temperature is still cooler than outside. Later, open up your house so the cool nighttime air can lower inside temperatures.
  • You can help the rising hot air move out of your house by opening windows on the lower floor toward the breeze and on the upper floor away from the breeze.
  • Use floor and ceiling fans as much as possible to circulate a cooling breeze. Also use window fans if not using air conditioning.
  • Sleep in a cooler part of the house, such as the basement.
  • Take showers and baths early in the morning or late at night.
  • Use appliances and equipment that give off heat (iron, TV sets, light bulbs, clothes dryer, hair dryer, etc.) only as needed and limit use to the early morning or at night, not during the middle of the day.
  • Serve your family cool meals such as sandwiches, salads or fruit dishes. Try not to use your stove, if possible, to keep from heating up the kitchen.
  • Remember not to let food sit out more than two hours; on a hot day (more than 90 degrees F) food should not go unrefrigerated for more than one hour. Also, always wash hands with warm water for at least 20 seconds before handling food.
  • Drink plenty of cool fluids (but not alcohol or caffeinated liquids, which can dehydrate) to replace sweat loss.
  • Dress comfortably in light, loose clothing and cover your head if outside.
  • Avoid heat stress — slow down and keep cool.
  • Keep tuned to radio and television for discomfort index warnings and keep in touch with others every day.
  • If your house becomes too warm, try to be in a cooler place during the hottest part of the day – a friend’s or neighbor’s home, a senior center, a shopping mall, a library or even outside in the shade of a tree.

Keep your cool

  • Reduce indoor moisture — dry clothes outside, cover cooking pots, take showers instead of baths.
  • Use exhaust fans.
  • Use a dehumidifier when needed.

The heat of a Missouri summer not only can make for high utility bills, but also can be deadly. Here are some tips to help keep you comfortable, healthy and penny-wise.

Help your air conditioner help you

  • Install window air conditioners snugly. Insulate spaces around air conditioners for a tighter fit.
  • Plug up all cracks and spaces around room air conditioners to keep out the hot, humid air. Caulk and weatherstrip your home — heat goes where it's cooler and that's inside your house.
  • If you have central air, set your thermostat no lower than 78 degrees F.
  • If you want to set your thermostat above 78 degrees F, you will adjust more easily to a gradual change; move it up one degree a week until it is at 82 degrees F.
  • Change or clean your air-conditioning filter once a month.

Control indoor air humidity

If your home is not air-conditioned, use moving air to beat the heat

  • Open all your windows early in the morning to get rid of heat and help cool the home.
  • When the temperature begins to rise, close the house. Block the sun from coming in by using awnings and solar screens. Reflect the sun away with aluminum foil or roller shades. Often you can keep this coolness until late afternoon.
  • Keep the house closed during the hottest time of day. Check your indoor and outdoor thermometers to make sure that the indoor temperature is still cooler than outside. Later, open up your house so the cool nighttime air can lower inside temperatures.
  • You can help the rising hot air move out of your house by opening windows on the lower floor toward the breeze and on the upper floor away from the breeze.
  • Use floor and ceiling fans as much as possible to circulate a cooling breeze. Also use window fans if not using air conditioning.
  • Sleep in a cooler part of the house, such as the basement.
  • Take showers and baths early in the morning or late at night.
  • Use appliances and equipment that give off heat (iron, TV sets, light bulbs, clothes dryer, hair dryer, etc.) only as needed and limit use to the early morning or at night, not during the middle of the day.
  • Serve your family cool meals such as sandwiches, salads or fruit dishes. Try not to use your stove, if possible, to keep from heating up the kitchen.
  • Remember not to let food sit out more than two hours; on a hot day (more than 90 degrees F) food should not go unrefrigerated for more than one hour. Also, always wash hands with warm water for at least 20 seconds before handling food.
  • Drink plenty of cool fluids (but not alcohol or caffeinated liquids, which can dehydrate) to replace sweat loss.
  • Dress comfortably in light, loose clothing and cover your head if outside.
  • Avoid heat stress — slow down and keep cool.
  • Keep tuned to radio and television for discomfort index warnings and keep in touch with others every day.
  • If your house becomes too warm, try to be in a cooler place during the hottest part of the day – a friend’s or neighbor’s home, a senior center, a shopping mall, a library or even outside in the shade of a tree.

Keep your cool

  • Reduce indoor moisture — dry clothes outside, cover cooking pots, take showers instead of baths.
  • Use exhaust fans.
  • Use a dehumidifier when needed.

 

Flood-related resources from MU Extension

by Curt Wohleber
Writer
University of Missouri Extension
Phone: 573-882-5409
Email: WohleberC@missouri.edu

Published: Friday, April 28, 2017

Editors: With flood warnings in effect in parts of Missouri this, these ready-to-publish news releases may be of interest to your readers:

Publications

In-depth information is available from these MU Extension publications, which are available for free download. (To access publications, use the links below or go extension.missouri.edu/publications/ and search by publication number.)

  • EMW1023, Quick Tips for Cleaning Up After a Flood – Tips on protective equipment; deciding what can be salvaged and what should be thrown away; safely drying, cleaning and disinfecting materials; and what to do before installing new drywall and insulation.
  • MP904, Resources for Your Flooded Home – Downloadable 24-page publication offers information about electrical systems; repairing walls; cleaning furniture, flooring, floor coverings, bedding and kitchen items; and controlling mold and mildew. Other information includes financial advice, filing insurance claims, avoiding fraud and hiring a contractor.
  • EMW1026, Safe Drinking Water in an Emergency – Downloadable guide sheet on storing and purifying drinking water during an emergency.

Missouri Flood Info on Facebook

Missouri Flood Info, http://www.facebook.com/MoFloodInfo, is a collaboration of state, federal and local agencies and organizations involved addressing flooding in Missouri, including the Partnership for Disaster Recovery. Managed by MU Extension.

Other links

 

FAQ About Handling Flooded Produce (PDF)

 

Food Safety After a Flood (PDF)

 

 

Journal Your Garden

The most challenging aspect of successful gardening just might be the difficulty recalling what worked and what didn't from year to year. Many gardeners believe the keys to successful gardening are getting your plans on paper first and keeping records. MU Extension's new publication, MP928, From Seed to Harvest and Beyond: Garden Journal and Calendar, gives you an easy way to record your garden plans, observations and ideas.

This publication also includes year-round resources to guide gardeners at all experience levels. Written by MU Extension horticulture specialists who teach Master Gardeners, this publication brings you reliable and relevant information.

Order today at http://extension.missouri.edu/mp928

 

Soil Testing Available

At Montgomery County Extension Office

Getting your soil tested is an important part of gardening and farming. Basic soil testing analyzes nutrient content and fertility status. Results include fertilizer and lime recommendations. Additional tests are available for nutrient management plans, environmental issues, potting mixes, compost, manure and water usage. Each sample should contain about 1½ cups of dry soil from 6 to 7 inches deep. Consult our soil testing publications for specific instructions. Bring your soil samples to the Montgomery County Extension Office, 310 Salisbury St., Ste. E., Montgomery City, MO 63361. Results are typically provided within two weeks.

 

2016 Annual Report

The 2016 Montgomery County Annual Report is now available in the extension office as well as on-line. The report is located on the left hand side of the this site under plans and reports. This report highlights 2016 extension programming and how it improves peoples' lives through research-based information. If you have any questions or comments, please call the Montgomery County Extension Office at 573-564-3733.