MU Extension Harrison County
100 Years Celebration

(BETHANY, MISSOURI, June 20, 2019) - On Saturday, July 27, 2019, Harrison County Extension Council members are inviting people of all ages to help celebrate 100 years of extension service in Harrison County.  Events planned for the day will provide an opportunity for the public to get a closer look at programming available through MU Extension, as well as help raise funds to support future programming. 

First on the schedule that day is a 5K Fun Run for runners and walkers of all ages and experience levels. Registration will begin at 8 a.m., and start at 9 a.m.  Registration for the Fun Run is $10 if registered by July 19, and participants will receive a free t-shirt.  Fun prizes will be presented to the top three overall male and female finishers. 

From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Harrison County Extension office, located in the basement of the Harrison County Courthouse (west entrance) will host an open house. The public is invited to visit with extension faculty, staff and council members and learn more about the history of extension and current programming.  During this time, extension specialists and staff serving Harrison County will have demonstrations and exhibits set up on the west side of the square that feature current extension programs and projects. 

As part of the 100 year celebration, MU Extension in Harrison County is upgrading their exterior signage located on the west side of the courtyard. This new sign will be unveiled at 11:30 a.m., and remarks will be provided by MU Extension in Harrison County council members and others. After remarks, a free light lunch of hot dogs, chips and cookies will be served by council members, as long as supplies last. 

To conclude the day, a Corn Hole Tournament is planned at 1:00 p.m. This tournament is open to two-person teams of any age and experience level, and will be a double elimination tournament.  Registration is $10 per person ($20 per team) if registered by July 19, and all participants will receive a free t-shirt.  Awards will be presented to the tournament winners. 

Extension services in Harrison County were inaugurated on January 1, 1919, when County Agent R.J. Hawat opened the doors of the first Extension Office in Bethany. Extension activities during those first years included: planting the first alfalfa in the County, which at that time was known as the miracle plant for feeding dairy cows; diagnosing coughing pigs with lung worms; support for beekeeping; and terracing demonstrations. 

Over the next 100 years, Extension played a role in everything from the modernization of agriculture and electrification of the County to building the County’s 4-H program, improving the lives of residents through health and nutrition programs, providing support to farmers and businesses, and much more.  Today, MU Extension Specialist working in Harrison County address multiple program areas, including: agronomy, livestock, health and nutrition, agriculture business, family development, 4-H youth development, horticulture, agricultural engineering, and community, economic and business development. 

Paper copies of registration forms may be obtained by visiting the Harrison County Extension Office located at 1505 Main, Courthouse Basement in Bethany.  Questions?  Please call 660-425-6434 or email harrisonco@missouri.edu.

5K Fun Run Registration Form

Corn Hole Tournament Registration Form

Field Specialist, Andy Luke

Agronomy Report - May 2019

Community Economic Development
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May Programs and Activities Report

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Missouri Farm Labor Guide

This guide is meant to share general information about developing an approach to human resources management. The material in the guide should not be used in place of legal, accounting or other professional opinions. Agricultural employers are encouraged to engage an attorney, accountant and other necessary professionals to ensure that their specific policies and human resources systems satisfy all necessary labor laws and business standards.

This guide can be found at the Harrison County Extension Office and on the web at: agebb.missouri.edu/commag/farmlabor.

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The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports that 35 percent of Missouri farmland is rented. That means that about 9.8 million acres of Missouri agricultural land is rented. To help both landowners and farmers, the University of Missouri has periodically surveyed landowners and farmers to detect trends in rental rates. The latest survey was taken in the summer of 2018. MU Extension Publication G427

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Know your nutrient and nitrate levels
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