Inspire the next generation . . .
Become a 4-H volunteer!cartoon image: volunteers make a world of difference

Volunteers are the heart of 4-H. See how you can impact our youth and make a difference! Check out the 4-H Volunteers page.


4-H Online enrollment (Click the clover)  
 

 

Bates County 2014 MO Century Farm families

 
The Randy & Ellen Bell family farm established 1892

 


The Ciggel-Case family farm established 1888

Myra Colin selected for Extension Leaders' Honor Roll


Tammy Roberts (right) presents Myra Colin with her certificate for being selected to the Extension Leaders' Honor Roll.

Bates County Extension Council honored at annual dinner


(left to right) Tyler Black, Jan Craft, Myra Colin, Jerry Ferguson and Alan Marr
not pictured: Wesley Merritt, Mary Fischer and Reggie Gregg

Journal your garden

The most challenging aspect of successful gardening just might be the difficulty recalling what worked and what didn't from year to year.  Many gardeners believe the keys to successful gardening are getting your plans on paper first and keeping records. MU Extension publication MP928, From Seed to Harvest and Beyond: Garden Journal and Calendar gives you an easy way to record your garden plans, observations and ideas.

The publication also includes year-round resources to guide gardeners at all experience levels. Written by MU Extension horticulture specialists who teach Master Gardeners, this publication brings your reliable and relevant information.

Don’t guess — soil tests save time and money

Soil testing is the best guide to the wise and efficient use of fertilizer and soil amendments, says Manjula Nathan, director of the MU Extension Soil Testing and Plant Diagnostic Services.

Whether you grow acres of row crops or have a vegetable patch in the backyard, a soil test will provide you with an analysis of nutrients and a set of recommendations for any improvements.

“We frequently get questions from customers like, ‘I apply fertilizer every year. How come my plants are not doing well?’” Nathan says.

“Most of the time the problem is they never have done a soil test, but have been guessing on fertilizer requirements,” she says. “They do not realize that by guessing they are wasting money by over- or underapplication, and the excess fertilizer can end up in streams, ponds and underground water, polluting the environment.”

Soil testing can be done through the extension office. The cost is $15 per sample. For more information, see these soil testing publications.

Like us on Facebook

Want to know what’s new with University of Missouri Extension? Like us on Facebook at http://facebook.com/MUExtension and follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/MUExtension.

Learn about new programs, get news you can use and see how extension adds value to Missouri.