24th Annual Midwest Regional Nursing Educators Conference

  • Date: Nov. 18, 2020 - Jan. 12, 2021
  • Format: online
  • Continuing education units: 11.14
  • $159.00
  • This course is offered by:
    Nursing Outreach

24th Annual Midwest Regional Nursing Educators Conference

The purpose of this one-day, virtual conference is to provide a forum for educators from both academic and practice-based settings to reflect on and discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the entire scope of educating pre-licensure nursing students. We will examine the unexpected and broad-reaching demands placed on hospitals (and other practice settings) and schools of nursing and how they responded early-on, now and into the future. The conference was developed by classroom and clinical academic faculty, seasoned hospital-based educators, and experienced simulation faculty. Educators from all settings will come together to share teaching strategies that work. This event will provide you with new ideas and tools to enhance the teaching-learning process. . 

Up to 6.89 contact hours will be awarded to all participants who attend the virtual conference in its entirety and complete the online evaluation form  or who view the recorded sessions in their entirety and complete the online evaluation form. 

An additional 4.25 contact hours will be awarded to all participants who view all the poster presentations found in the On-Demand option of this conference and complete the online evaluation form. 

Total of 11.14 contact hours may be earned.

For additional support, please access our online course enrollment and course access instructions.

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24th Annual Midwest Regional Nursing Educators Conference: Practice ad Academic Perspectives in Nursing Education: Managing Through COVID-19

The purpose of this one-day, virtual conference is to provide a forum for educators from both academic and practice-based settings to reflect on and discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the entire scope of educating pre-licensure nursing students. We will examine the unexpected and broad-reaching demands placed on hospitals (and other practice settings) and schools of nursing and how they responded early-on, now and into the future. The conference was developed by classroom and clinical academic faculty, seasoned hospital-based educators, and. experienced simulation faculty. Educators from all settings will share teaching strategies that work. This event will provide you with new ideas and tools to enhance the teaching-learning process. 

 Agenda

 8:00 - 8:05  Opening remarks/Welcome

 8:05 - 9:25  Apprenticeship/Partnership Clinical Learning Models

8:05 – 8:10  This presentation is designed to start the dialog for the development of academic and clinical partnerships to foster and innovate clinical education.

Facilitator: Bibi Schultz, MSN, RN, CNE, Director of Education, Missouri State Board of Nursing, Bibi Schultz, Jefferson City

 8:10 – 8:40  Pivoting Education During COVID-19: Student Nurse Apprenticeship Program (SNAP)

Brittany Burke, DNP, NEA-BC, RNC-OB, Director, Center for Nursing Practice, Norton Healthcare, Institute for Education and Development, Louisville, Kentucky

Norton Healthcare’s Student Apprenticeship (SNAP) is the first prelicensure nursing apprenticeship (BSN) program, in the United States.  It is a three-tiered model of intentional investing in student nurses through three tiers: culture, clinical and confidence.  This paid apprenticeship provides elevated educational and clinical experience for 12-18 months.  Some students gain academic credit and at the same time they gain clinical experiences, for which they are paid.  The apprenticeship program helps prepare for a registered nurse role after graduation.  Learn how a healthcare system quickly pivoted to safely prepare student nurses during COVID-19.

8:40 – 8:55  Partnership Model at East Central College

Nancy Mitchell, MSN, RN, Director of Nursing and Dean of Health Sciences, East Central College, Union, Missouri

Earn While You Learn to be an RN pilot program created a win-win situation and a seamless transition to practice upon graduation. Hands-on clinical learning, increased confidence by combining education with clinical practice and becoming acclimated to the healthcare culture. The importance of building strong relationships with clinical partners/institutions creates the opportunity to enhance nursing education and the nursing pipeline.

8:55 – 9:10  Development of Clinical Partnership: An Apprenticeship Model

Sandra Wilson, MSN, RN, Director of Nursing, Crowder College, Neosho, Missouri

Crowder College has partnered with two area clinical facilities to place students in Clinical Partnerships where they are employed by the clinical site in a precepted position and are able to complete their clinical hours at the same time. We will look at the different perspectives to consider with building this model:  the students, the clinical site and the school.

9:10 – 9:25  Q & A session – facilitated by Bibi Schultz

9:25 - 9:30   Reset

9:30 –10:00  COVID – 19 Continued Active Response Environment in Practice Settings

Mary Beck, DNP, RN, NE-BC, Chief Nursing Officer, University of Missouri Health Care, Columbia

The University of Missouri (MU) Health Care, is a 600-bed academic health sciences center, initiated the Incident Command Structure early on as the organization framework for leading this complex organization through COVID-19.  As the Chief Nursing Officer, Dr. Beck assumed a leadership role along with the Chief Medical Officer.  Dr. Beck will describe the initial and ongoing planning and implementation strategies for care of patients with COVID-10 including surge/staffing shortages, using the Incident Command Structure.  Critical considerations regarding supply chain, staffing, flexibility of the health care team members to support each other, and alternative methods to provide for patient needs will be presented.

10:00 – 10:30 COVID – 19 Impact & Response: From the Academic Education Perspective

Robin Harris, DNP, RN, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Associate Teaching Professor, Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia

As COVID 19 hit our schools of nursing, clinical education and in person learning halted, leaving faculty and students with a steep learning curve into online didactic and clinical learning.  Dr. Harris will describe the initial and continuing response to support nursing education including rapid faculty development, policy changes, virtual learning, workload issues, and learning how to “lean in” to a constantly changing academic and clinical environment.  What we all assumed as temporary changes to nursing education; we are now learning will forever impact the way nursing education is delivered. 

10:30 – 10:35  Reset

10:35 - 12:00  COVID – 19 Impact and Response: The Simulation Perspective – Facilitator: Dena Higbee, EdS, MS, CHSE, Executive Director of Simulation, MU School of Medicine & MU Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia

10:35 – 11:05  Simulation – Now and Into the Future

A nationally and internationally recognized simulation expert, Dena Higbee has written and presented on the use of standardized patient encounters, best safety practices, simulation design, using mobile simulation for hard-to-meet learner needs and much more.  She will address the substantial increase in the use of simulation to replace hands-on clinical time.  Dena and her team have developed creative and innovative approaches to simulation, using both high and low fidelity manikins. With more than 20 years of simulation experience, Dena’s knowledge of building and expanding programs will provide insight for the future of simulation.

10:50 – 11:05  Geriatric Delirium/Dementia Synchronous Simulation Using Zoom

Kari Lane, PhD, RN, MOT, Associate Teaching Professor, MU Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia

Prior to COVID, Dr. Lane and her colleagues conducted a Geriatric Delirium/Dementia simulation with actors in a face to face manner. Due to COVID we needed to move this simulation to an online distance mediated activity.  We used Zoom breakout rooms to maintain the synchronous format with the students and the actors. While there were some logistical and communication factors we needed to address, we were able to maintain the same level of satisfaction and engagement between students and actors.  This presentation will share lessons learned from this Geriatric Delirium/Dementia simulation.

11:05 – 11:35 The Use of Simulation to Augment Clinical Time in Response to COVID-19

James K. Spence, BSN, MPA-HSA, RN, BSN Program Director, and Christine Zimmerman, PhD, RN, CHSE,    Director of Clinical Simulation, both from the School of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Missouri-Kansas City

This session will describe the coordinated effort between the BSN program director and the simulation director at UMKC to provide a relatively seamless rapid transition to on-line learning in the effort to meet clinical competencies. A description of a novel approach to on-line simulation will also be presented- - one that required a great deal of creativity and ingenuity, but very little money!               

11:35 – 12:00 Q & A session – facilitated by Dena Higbee

12:00 – 12:30  Lunch

12:30 – 12:50  Virtual Endocrine Case Scenario using Zoom and Standard Patient

Renae McIntosh, MSN, RN, Pediatric Instructor of Nursing, MU Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia

COVID-19 not only changed the delivery of didactics but simulations as well.  Standardized patients could no longer be used.  However, in this case, the Pediatric instructor continued to use her standardized patient – who is her daughter!  This presentation describes the adaptions needed to an established endocrine virtual simulation using Zoom, Panopto and a breakout box.

12:50 – 12:55  Reset

12:55 – 1:15  Virtual Skills Trainers

Hillary Claunch, MSN. RN, Instructor of Nursing, MU Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia

Sue Yun Fowler, MA, RN, Instructor of Nursing, MU Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia

When a pandemic limits access to the simulation lab for in-person and hands-on skills practice, what do you do? If you can’t bring the students to the lab, bring the lab to the students!

1:15 – 1:20  Reset

1:20 – 1:40  PowerPoint’s Fancy Toolbar: Options to Gussy Up Interactive Presentations

Nadia Chernookaya, ACCNS-AG, CCRN, CEN, Instructor of Clinical Nursing, MU Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia

COVID-19 caused a pressing need for innovative teaching in the 2020 Spring Semester. Conversion of two high-fidelity simulations to a virtual platform for Medical Surgical nursing students became necessary. PowerPoint proved to be an inexpensive, readily available, and creative program that allowed students to complete an Admission and Discharge and Cardiac simulation while effectively using the student’s clinical reasoning skills.

1:40 – 2:00  Boot Camp MU Sinclair School of Nursing

Amber Vroman, MS(N), RN, CMSRN, Interim Director of Undergraduate Program, and Sherri Ulbrich, PhD, RN, CCRN, Associate Teaching Professor, both from the MU Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia

This session will describe the Sinclair School of Nursing’s Boot Camp, which was an instructional “catch-up” method used to compensate for the disrupted clinical experiences and prepare students to best use clinical time in the Fall 2020 semester.

2:00 – 2:10   Break

2:10 – 2:40  Preceptor Enrichment Programs: Meeting the Challenge

 Educators are seeking creative ways to increase clinical learning opportunities, especially for those who missed clinical time due to COVID-19.  The session will examine the state of multiple preceptor training programs and plans going forward.  Learn how programs are being retrofitted using the lessons learned from the effects of COVID-19.  Some preceptor program revisions are extensive, and others plan to ease into the transition and make incremental changes on a case by case basis.

Joyce Gentry, PhD, MSN, RN, Professor of Nursing, Columbia College, Columbia

Pam Martin, MSN, NPD-BC, ANA-BC, Clinical Educator, Training and Development, Boone Hospital Center, Columbia

Betsy Reeves, MSN, RN, Simulation Coordinator, Learning Organization, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veteran’s Hospital, Columbia

Lynette L. Roebuck, BAE, BSN, RN, Clinical Educator, Center for Education and Development, University of Missouri Health Care, Columbia

2:40-2:45     Reset

2:45 – 3:15   Kansas City Missouri’s Veteran’s Administration: Growing VA Nurses

Sharon Shade, MA, RN, TTP/PBNR/VALOR Nurse Manager

  • Cosmas Ayabie, RN, RN Resident, UMKC BSN graduate 5/2020; former VALOR student intern
  • Erica Hoover, RN, TTP RN Resident; class of July 2020
  • Jentry Seichepine, VALOR student, nursing student; graduation Spring 2021

In this session information will be shared about the VA programs which serve to prepare nursing students and newly graduated nurses.  Three training programs to Grow VA Nurses will be discussed.  Each panelist will share their experiences and lessons learned in their journey, during a global  pandemic.  The benefits of these established training programs will identify areas which support their growth into a practice ready, Registered Nurse.  

  • VALOR – VA Learning Opportunity Residency
  • TTP – Transition to Practice; immersion clinical nurse residency on a specialty unit
  • PBNR – Post Baccalaureate Nurse Residency Program

3:15 – 3:20   Reset

3:20 – 3:35  COVID-19 Effect on ED New Graduate Orientation and Success

Gavin McDonald, RN, Staff Development and Clinical Coordinator, Emergency Department, Phelps Health, Rolla

During 2020, multiple new graduate nurses were hired into our Emergency Department.  Their orientations have proven difficult and challenging for the orientee, preceptor, department and patients.  Although a lot was learned, there is more to explore in order to ensure success for the new graduate nurses in the ED.  This session will explore our journey and seek input on how others have handled similar challenges.

3:35 - 3:40   Reset

3:40 – 4:00  Precepting New Nurses During Pandemic Times

Margaret Fennewald, RN, MU Women’s and Children’s Hospital, University of Missouri, Columbia

Tracy Bocklage, BSN, RN-C, MU Women’s and Children’s Hospital, University of Missouri, Columbia

The disruption in the amount of time and nature of the clinical experience (more virtual simulations and less hands-on clinical time) has not only affected academic nursing education, it has greatly impacted the important role of the clinical preceptor.  End the day by hearing from two-seasoned preceptors who will share their experiences - what they have observed and how they have had to change their usual methods due to the impact of COVID.

4:00 – 4:15  Wrap up, evaluation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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