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MX950, Complete Guide to Home Canning

related information: Nutrition and health > Nutrition > Food > Preservation

GH1451, Quality for Keeps: Before You Start to Can, Learn the Basics
Canning preserves food by using heat to destroy the microorganisms that cause spoilage. Heat forces air out of the jar. As the jar cools, a seal (vacuum) forms. The processing times and temperatures in University of Missouri Extension publications have been set through scientific research. For safe, high-quality home-canned food, it’s important that you follow these directions carefully.
related information: Nutrition and health > Nutrition > Food > Preservation

GH1454, Quality for Keeps: Preserve Your Garden Delights — How to Can Fresh Vegetables
Vegetables are at peak quality for six to 12 hours after harvesting. Vegetables picked from your garden or purchased from nearby producers are usually good for canning. If you must delay canning fresh vegetables, keep them refrigerated until you are ready to begin.
related information: Nutrition and health > Nutrition > Food > Preservation

N660, Can-Do Recipes: Canned Chicken
Easy-to-prepare recipes using canned chicken as the main ingredient are displayed in this four-page flier. Additional cooking and preparation tips, measurement conversions, safety measures and a glossary of cooking terms are also included.
related information: Nutrition and health > Nutrition > Food > Preparation

N662, Can-Do Recipes: Canned Tuna
This flier provides simple recipes using canned tuna such as apple tuna sandwiches, oven toasted tuna melts, creamy tuna noodles and more. This four-page flier also includes a glossary of cooking terms, measurement equivalents, and additional info about canned tuna such as nutrition facts, storage suggestions and safety tips.
related information: Nutrition and health > Nutrition > Food > Preparation

N664, Can-Do Recipes: Corn
This flier provides simple recipes using canned corn such as taco soup, potato corn chowder and more. This four-page flier also includes a glossary of cooking terms, measurement equivalents, and additional info about canned corn such as nutrition facts, storage suggestions and safety tips.
related information: Nutrition and health > Nutrition > Food > Preparation

GH1452, Quality for Keeps: Steps to Success in Home Canning
Your home-canned products will be only as good as the fresh foods you start with. For high-quality, safe, home-canned foods, select the freshest foods possible. Discard diseased and moldy foods. Don't can foods that you wouldn't serve at your table fresh.
related information: Nutrition and health > Nutrition > Food > Preservation

GH1490, Quality for Keeps: Canning Meat, Fish and Poultry
Pressure canning is the only safe method for canning meat, fish and poultry. It is the only way you can destroy the bacterium that causes food poisoning (Clostridium botulinum). Be sure to process canned meats for the correct time at the correct temperature in a pressure canner. Canning low-acid foods, such as meats, in boiling-water canners is absolutely unsafe because the botulinum bacteria can survive this process. If Clostridium botulinum survive and grow inside a sealed jar of food, they can produce a poisonous toxin. Even a taste of food containing this toxin can be fatal. Boil foods 10 minutes at altitudes below 1,000 feet to destroy this poison. Boil foods 11 minutes if you live above 1,000 feet.
related information: Nutrition and health > Nutrition > Food > Preservation

N666, Can-Do Recipes: Beans
This flyer provides simple recipes using canned beans such as three bean chili, zesty bean and pasta salad and more. This four-page flyer also includes a glossary of cooking terms, measurement equivalents and additional cooking info about canned beans such as how to lower you sodium intake.
related information: Nutrition and health > Nutrition > Food > Preparation

WM6001, Safe Use, Storage and Disposal of Paint
Paint is a common product we all have in our homes that can become a household hazardous waste when it is not properly stored or disposed.
related information: Natural resources > Environmental quality > Waste management > Household hazardous waste