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Vine Weeds of Missouri

Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica)

Japanese honeysuckle

Growth habit

  • Perennial

Other names

  • Chinese honeysuckle
  • Woodbine

Origin

  • Asia

Control classification

  • Moderately easy

Note

  • Before using any herbicide, read and follow directions on the label accompanying that product. Reference to specific trade names does not imply endorsement by the University of Missouri; discrimination is not intended against similar products.

Japanese honeysuckle


 

Japanese honeysuckle escaped from cultivation and has quickly become a pest of landscapes, thickets and rights-of-way. Its aggressive growth outcompetes native vegetation by vigorous above ground runners and underground rhizomes. Planting of Japanese honeysuckle is not recommended in Missouri because of its ability to choke out shrubs and small trees. The leaves of the plant are opposite and ovate with entire margins. Its stems have a reddish brown coloration and are hairy. The flowers are fragrant and range in color from creamy white to yellow. Although some species of honeysuckle in Missouri have bright red or orange berries, Japanese honeysuckle has black fruit that contains two or three seeds.

Although the plant was originally most frequently encountered in southeast Missouri, it is now scattered throughout the state.
 

IPM1021, new December 2003

Wild thing
 

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IPM1021 Vine Weeds of Missouri | Page 7 | University of Missouri Extension