Revised January 2003

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SX1012, Profitable Pork: Alternative Strategies for Hog Producers

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Profitable Pork: Alternative Strategies for Hog Producers

Editor's note
The following abstract describes a publication that is intended for print distribution or as a downloadable PDF. Please see links to the PDF file and ordering information on this page.

Farmers who want to successfully produce pork on a small scale can preserve their independence in the face of the consolidating hog industry. "Profitable Pork: Alternative Strategies for Hog Producers" showcases examples of alternate ways to raise pork profitably. In designing hog systems that work on their farms — in deep-straw bedding, in hoop structures and on pasture — producers have been able to save on fixed costs, find greater flexibility, identify unique marketing channels and enjoy a better quality of life.

Sustainable Agriculture NetworkSustainable agriculture refers to an agricultural production and distribution system that:

  • Achieves the integration of natural biological cycles and controls,
  • Protects and renews soil fertility and the natural resource base,
  • Optimizes the management and use of on-farm resources,
  • Reduces the use of nonrenewable resources and purchased production inputs,
  • Provides an adequate and dependable farm income,
  • Promotes opportunity in family farming and farm communities, and
  • Minimizes adverse impacts on health, safety, wildlife, water quality and the environment.

Keywords

  • Successful hog producers
  • Achieving greater profits
  • Raising better-tasting pork
  • Alternative hog systems

Pages

  • 16

SX1012, revised January 2003


SX1012 Profitable Pork: Alternative Strategies for Hog Producers | University of Missouri Extension