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Quail-Friendly Plants of the Midwest

Paspalums

  • Paspalum spp.
  • Dallis grass

Grass

Brood coverFood
Paspalums

Paspalums are prolific seed producers.

Scott Sudkamp, Missouri Department of Conservation


Paspalum seeds line up neatly in rows

Paspalum seeds line up neatly in rows. Seed shape and arrangement on the stem are the most readily identifiable feature of the paspalums.

©Patrick J. Alexander, USDA-NRCS Plants Database


 

Seeds are attached in two or four rows

Some paspalum species have conspicuous silky hairs at the base of the spikelet. On the seed stalk, seeds are attached in two or four rows.

©Patrick J. Alexander, USDA-NRCS Plants Database

Seeds

Seeds are round and flattened, with a conspicuous midrib. (scale divisions = 1 mm)

Fred Fishel, University of Missouri

Description

The most obvious characteristic of the paspalums is the shape of the seeds and their manner of attachment. Seeds are round and flattened and are neatly lined up (but sometimes overlapping slightly) on the seed stalk in two or four rows.

Use by bobwhites

As with the panic grasses, paspalums rarely dominate a stand, but rather occur scattered about and tend to increase diversity and provide the kind of habitat structure that is beneficial for nesting, brood and roosting cover. Bobwhites consume the seeds, sometimes stripping them off the plant. The seeds of several species are at peck-height for easy feeding, which may contribute to their frequent use by quail.


 

MP903, new May 2008

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MP903 Quail-Friendly Plants of the Midwest | Page 38 | University of Missouri Extension