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IPM1007, Practical Weed Science for the Field Scout: Corn and Soybean

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Practical Weed Science for the Field Scout: Corn and Soybean

Knotweed, Japanese (Solanum carolinense) also called Japanese bamboo

Perennial broadleaf

Knotweed
KnotweedAn invasive perennial introduced to the United States from Japan as an ornamental that spreads by rhizomes and seed. Japanese bamboo now occurs as a weed of riverbanks, landscapes and occasionally no-till agronomic crops. Leaves are arranged alternately along the stem, are egg shaped in outline and about 4 to 6 inches long by 2-1/2 to 4-1/4 inches wide. Leaf bases are cut straight across. Stems are stout, hollow and jointed and resemble those of bamboo. A thin membranous sheath (ocrea) encircles the stem at each joint. Stems may reach as much as 13 feet in height. Flowers occur in clusters and are small and white.

Knotweed
 

 

Wild thing
 

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