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Fruit Spray Schedules for the Homeowner

Raspberries

Raspberries and blackberries

Raspberries and blackberries
Delayed dormant sprays

Apply when tips of buds show green.

Red-necked cane borers

key pests or pest complexes

A key pest
or pest complex

  • Comments
    Characteristic injury is a swelling of the cane, about 3 inches long, with a splitting of the bark. Infested canes are weakened and often die. Remove and burn infested canes in early spring.

Anthracnose

key pests or pest complexes

A key pest
or pest complex

  • Material
    liquid lime sulfur
  • Comments
    Apply to canes when leaves are emerging from buds and before the blossoms open. This spray may damage the new leaves if they are longer than 0.75-inch long.

Raspberries and blackberries
Prebloom sprays

Apply when blossom buds first appear through when flowers show white.

Red-necked cane borer

key pests or pest complexes

A key pest
or pest complex

  • Material
    pyrethrins and rotenone
  • Comments
    See comments in "delayed dormant" section. Adult beetles typically appear when flowers show white. Newly formed swellings can be seen in July and August.
    Apply insecticide when bloom begins and again 7 to 14 days later. Direct spray to lower part of the primocane and avoid spraying the blossoms.

Raspberry crown borer

  • Material
    pyrethrins and rotenone
  • Comments
    Infested canes become spindly, lack vigor and often break off at ground level. Remove and destroy weakened or infested canes. Drench crown and lower 2 feet of cane with insecticide.

Raspberry fruitworm

  • Material
    carbaryl
    or esfenvalerate
    or neem
    or pyrethrins and rotenone
    or spinosad
  • Comments
    Grubs tunnel into the center of the fruit to feed, may cause premature fruit drop. Adult beetles feed on foliage resulting in the leaves being skeletonized. Early developing fruit is more at risk than later developing varieties. Apply insecticide when blossom buds first appear and then again before the blossoms open.
    Neem (azadirachtin) is a botanical insecticide.

Blackberry psylla

  • Material
    esfenvalerate
  • Comments
    Feeding damage causes tightly curled leaf clusters. Such leaf clusters should be removed and destroyed immediately. Apply insecticide when this damage first appears (or first notice of adults).

Tarnished plant bug

  • Material
    malathion
    or esfenvalerate
    or permethrin
    or insecticidal soap
  • Comments
    Damaged berries are malformed, and the whitening of a damaged druplet occurs when mature fruit are attacked. If needed, apply sprays just before the blossoms open and then again when the fruit start to color.
    Controlling weeds in and around the planting helps to reduce tarnished plant bug populations.

Raspberries and blackberries
Postbloom through harvest sprays

Spotted wing drosophila

  • Material
    spinosad
  • Comments
    Fall-bearing bramble cultivars are particularly susceptible. Insecticide treatment should begin when fruit first begins to color and continue through harvest. For more on SWD, see Lincoln University Cooperative Extension publication FS18A2013, Monitoring for Spotted Wing Drosophila (PDF).
  • Days between last application and harvest
    Table 2

Tarnished plant bug

  • Material
    malathion
    or esfenvalerate
    or permethrin
    or insecticidal soap
  • Comments
    See comments in "pre-bloom sprays" section.
    Apply every 14 days after petal-fall as needed.

Japanese beetle, green June beetle, rose chafer, sap beetles

  • Material
    carbaryl
    or malathion
    or permethrin
    or pyrethrins and rotenone
  • Comments
    Adult beetles feeding on ripening fruit and foliage.
  • Days between last application and harvest
    Table 2

Orange rust

  • Comments
    In the early spring remove and destroy any infested plants, taking care to remove as much of the root system as possible.

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G6010 Fruit Spray Schedules for the Homeowner | Page 8 | University of Missouri Extension