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Fruit Spray Schedules for the Homeowner

Grapes

Grapes

Grapes
Dormant sprays

Apply before buds swell.

Anthracnose, powdery mildew, phomopsis, cane and leaf spot

key pests or pest complexes

A key pest
or pest complex

  • Material
    liquid lime sulfur

Grapes
Early cover sprays

Apply at bud swell, 1-inch shoot growth through first appearance of bloom.

Flea beetles

  • Material
    carbaryl
  • Comments
    Larvae and adults can feed on foliage. Most serious damage occurs in the spring when adult beetles feed on newly swollen grape buds. If more than 4 percent of buds are damaged apply an insecticide.

Climbing cutworm, leafrollers, aphids

  • Material
    carbaryl
    or malathion
    or spinosad
    or Bacillus thuringiensis
  • Comments
    These pests may be present anytime between 4- to 10-inch shoot growth and bloom. Scout twice weekly. Apply insecticides only when necessary.
    Spinosad for worms only.
    Bacillus thuringiensis for caterpillars only.

Mites

  • Material
    insecticidal soap
  • Comments
    For insecticidal soap repeat application 3 to 4 days later up to day of harvest.

Phomopsis

  • Material
    captan
    or copper

Black rot, powdery mildew, downy mildew

key pests or pest complexes

A key pest
or pest complex

  • Material
    captan
    or sulfur
    or mancozeb
    or myclobutanil
    or copper
  • Comments
    For powdery mildew, use myclobutanil or sulfur.
    For downy mildew, use captan or mancozeb .
    Captan and sulfur are only slightly effective against black rot.
    Copper for black rot, downy mildew and powdery mildew.

Grapes
Bloom sprays

Apply when caps begin to fall.

Grape phylloxera

  • Comments
    Wart-like galls found on leaves and galls on the roots may cause vine death or premature defoliation and retarded shoot growth.
    Control of the root gall form of grape phylloxera can be achieved by using rootstocks derived from native American grapes.
    There is no known completely successful chemical control for the root form of grape phylloxera.

Black rot, powdery mildew, downy mildew

key pests or pest complexes

A key pest
or pest complex

  • Material
    captan
    or myclobutanil
    or sulfur
  • Comments
    See comments in "early cover sprays" section.

Grapes
Postbloom, summer cover to harvest sprays

Apply 7 to 10 days after bloom. Thereafter, sprays should be applied every 10 to 14 days.

Black rot, powdery mildew, downy mildew

  • Material
    captan
    or myclobutanil
    or sulfur
  • Comments
    Sulfur applications may injure plants if temperature exceeds 85 degrees Fahrenheit.

Grape berry moth

  • Material
    carbaryl
    or neem
    or spinosad
  • Comments
    Infestation includes grape berries being webbed together with silken threads and turning dark purple in color. Infested berries may drop from the stems when grapes are about the size of a pea. The larvae tunnel into the berries and feed internally. Several berries in a cluster may be affected. Infested vines should be sprayed at petal fall and again 7 to 10 days later.
  • Days between last application and harvest
    Table 2

Gray mold fruit rot

  • Material
    copper
  • Days between last application and harvest
    Begin treatment at the end of bloom and repeat at 7- to 14-day intervals.

Mites

  • Material
    insecticidal soap
  • Days between last application and harvest
    Table 2

Leafhopper, leafrollers, mealybugs, aphids

  • Material
    carbaryl
    or malathion
    or pyrethrins and rotenone
    or insecticidal soap
    or spinosad
  • Comments
    It is important to monitor for all insect pests after petal fall, and apply insecticide as needed. Refer to product label for specific insects and harvest restrictions.
    Spinosad for worms only.
  • Days between last application and harvest
    Table 2

Rose chafer, Japanese beetle

  • Material
    carbaryl
    or malathion
  • Comments
    Rose chafer adults feed on blossom buds and leaves. Insecticide treatments should occur after bloom when the first adults are noticed, and if there are on average more than 2 beetles per vine. A second application in June might be needed.
    Japanese beetle adults feed on the leaves and skeletonize the tissue. If about more that 15 percent of the leaves are damaged then an insecticide spray is recommended (high beetle populations may require repeated applications).
  • Days between last application and harvest
    Table 2

G6010, reviewed March 2011

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