January 2017 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 1-7, 2017
Title: “Deciduous Tree Pruning”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

The best time to prune most deciduous trees is in late winter or early spring, before they begin to leaf out. However, if your trees have been damaged in a winter storm, you may need to prune them right away, especially if life or property is in danger. Please keep safety in mind. If you lack the expertise, or the job is too big, call a professional tree service. They have the experience and knowledge to do the job safely.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 8-14, 2017
Title: “House Plant Tips”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

When caring for houseplants this winter, be sure to dust them off on a regular basis. This will not only make a more attractive plant, it also allows the plant to gather light more efficiently, resulting in better growth.  When watering your plants, be sure to let the water warm up to room temperature. And if insect pests attack your plant, try an insecticidal soap to kill them.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 15-21, 2017
Title: “Ice Melters”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Winter storms usually leave ice and snow on sidewalks which can be quite hazardous. Ice melters can take care of that last bit of ice which is difficult to remove.  But when using ice melters, consider your plants. Use just enough to get the job done. These materials are salts and can harm plant roots if used in excess.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 22-28, 2017
Title: “Wood Ashes in the Garden”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Wood ashes can make a great soil amendment to your garden in certain situations. They add minerals which can help your plants grow better. If your soil is too acid, wood ashes will slowly increase the soil’s pH and bring it closer to normal.  However, wood ashes can also be overdone. Too many wood ashes can actually make your soil alkaline, which is not good for most plants.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.