April 2016 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of April 3-9, 2016
Title: “Try New Vegetable Varieties”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Everyone has their favorite vegetable varieties they like to plant in their garden.  It’s good to stick with what you know works in your area.  But be open to new varieties.  I always encourage gardeners to try out a new variety or two each year. You may find something you really like, and it may find a permanent place in your garden.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of April 10-16, 2016
Title: “Summer Cover Crops in your Garden"

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Cover crops are traditionally used in the winter to reduce soil erosion in your garden.  However, you might consider using it in the summer as well.  Perhaps your cool season crop has finished, and there’s not enough time to plant a warm season crop, but it’s too early for another cool season crop.  Plant a cover crop!  You can suppress weeds, reduce erosion and add fertility with a good cover crop.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of April 17-23, 2016
Title: “Filling in Flower Beds"

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

If you have bulbs in your flower bed, watch their patterns as they come up.  Look for gaps in your overall plan that may need filling.  Think about other places in your landscape that might benefit from bulbs.  Consider new varieties and even new types of bulbs that you may not have used before.  Write this all down, and make a note to order these next August.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of April 24-30, 2016
Title: “Training Young Fruit Trees"

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

To avoid structural problems in your fruit trees when they are older, it is critical to train them properly when they are young.  Scaffold branches should have a wide angle relative to the trunk, at least 60 degrees.  Narrow branch angles develop bark inclusions as they grow, which are weak and subject to breakage.  Use wooden clothespins to spread them apart, and force them to grow at a wide angle.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.