January 2016 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 3-9, 2016
Title: “Insects and House Plants”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

House plants can sometimes attract insect pests such as aphids or mealybugs.  For many insects, insecticidal soaps can be safely sprayed on your houseplants to eliminate these pests.  Mealybugs are easily killed by touching them with a cotton swab soaked in rubbing alcohol.  And if you receive a house plant as a gift, isolate it for a while from your other plants to make sure it doesn’t harbor any insect pests.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 10-16, 2016
Title: “Ice and Snow on Ornamental Plants”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Heavy snow can be removed from your outdoor woody plants by gently brushing the snow from the branches.  However, ice is a different matter.  Never try to remove ice from branches, as this is likely to cause damage.  It’s better to let it melt off when warmer weather arrives.  If your plant already has damage, prune it off to prevent further damage.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 17-23, 2016
Title: “Chlorine Damage in House Plants”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Some house plants are sensitive to the chlorine contained in tap water.  To remove this chemical, water should be placed in open containers and allowed to stand overnight.  This will allow the chlorine gas to dissipate before you use the water on your plants.  For super-sensitive plants, you may need to use rain water.  Be sure to allow it to warm to room temperature before using it.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 24-30, 2016
Title: “Wood Ashes in the Garden”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

If you heat with wood, consider using the ashes next year in your garden. Be sure to store wood ashes in sealed, fireproof containers. Wood ashes are a good source of many minerals, but be aware that using wood ashes through the years can raise your soil’s pH.  It’s best to get a soil test first to make sure the pH isn’t already too high. If the pH is low enough, feel free to add wood ashes to garden soils or your compost pile.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.