September 2013 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Sept. 1 - 7, 2013
Title: Transplanting Mums

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Mums are great flowers for fall planting because they easily transplant while blooming.  Water the soil where you intend to transplant thoroughly several hours before planting.  If you dig the plants, try to keep as much of the root system as possible.  And be sure to water well after transplanting.  It’s best to move them during the morning or late evening hours when temperatures are coolest. 

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Sept. 8 - 14, 2013
Title: Fall Fertilization

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

As a general rule, it’s best not to fertilize trees and other woody plants during the fall.  The reason is that excessive fertilizer will promote succulent growth, which is tender and more subject to winter damage.  It’s best to wait until spring, when the plant has broken dormancy.  With cool season grasses, however, fall is a good time to fertilize.  Stop by your local Extension Center for a soil test kit to know exactly how much fertilizer to apply. 

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Sept. 15 - 21, 2013
Title: Winter Squash and Pumpkins

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

If you are growing winter squash or pumpkins, wait until they are fully mature before harvesting.  If you harvest them too early, the skin will not have matured and they will be more subject to rotting diseases.  Cut them from the vine with a short piece of the stem still attached.  Also, be sure to harvest them before the first frost since this will improve their storage life. 

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Sept. 22 - 28, 2013
Title: Apple Scab

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

One of the most common diseases in crab apples is apple scab.  This disease weakens the tree, and in bad cases will defoliate it early.  When cleaning up this fall, be sure to rake up leaves, twigs, and fruit from those trees, and remove them from the site.  This will decrease the amount of disease organism from the area, and give you a head start on control measures for next year. 

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension