November 2015 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of November 1-7, 2015
Title: “Watering evergreens for winter”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

When deciduous trees lose their leaves, this stops the transpiration process.  Thus, their water requirements over the winter are minimal.  Evergreens, however, continue to take up water and transpire it out through their leaves all winter long.  If it is particularly dry going into the fall, irrigate to make sure that the ground has plenty of moisture, before the soil freezes.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of November 8-14, 2015
Title: “Fall care of vegetable gardens”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

It’s a good idea to clean up your vegetable garden in the fall. Remove diseased plant material and weeds that have gone to seed.  Any compost left over and additional organic matter can be tilled into the soil.  Tilling also exposes some insect pests to winter cold, reducing their numbers.  And consider a cover crop, especially if your location is prone to soil erosion.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of November 15-21, 2015
Title: “Winter use of mulch for fruits”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Mulch is a great idea.  It conserves moisture, keeps soils cooler in summer’s heat, and helps keep the weeds down.  But you have to be careful using mulch in the orchard during the winter.  Mulch provides a good cover for mice and voles, which may damage your fruit trees.  Be sure to pull the mulch back from the tree a good distance to keep these pests at bay.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of November 22-28, 2015
Title: “Protecting young trees in winter”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Young fruit trees and ornamental trees need protection during the winter.  Freeze/thaw cycles cause damage on the trunk when sunshine warms the trunk in the day, and temperatures fall below freezing at night.  Mice, rabbits, and other animals may chew at the bark, sometimes enough to kill the tree.  Both problems can be prevented by using a commercial white plastic expandable tree guard.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.