November 2013 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Nov. 3 - 9, 2013
Title: Guy Wires

Here's a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

If you have a tree which is supported by a guy wire, remember to check this fall to make sure that the hose section which protects the tree from the wire is still in place.  Winter winds will be causing a lot of tree movement, and unprotected wire could cause a lot of damage to your tree.  You may also want to check the position of the wire, in case in needs to be placed differently to avoid damage.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Nov. 10 - 16, 2013
Title: Tree Trunk Protection

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Young trees with smooth bark are especially subject to winter injury due to fluctuating temperatures and strong sunshine.  To protect your tree, wrap it with a commercial tree wrap, burlap strips, or simply paint the trunk with an inexpensive white latex paint.  Be sure it’s a latex paint.  And if you wrap the tree with burlap, be sure to untie it next spring when growth resumes.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Nov. 17-23, 2013
Title: Earthworms

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Earthworms are great for breaking down organic matter in your soil to provide nutrients, but soon they will start digging deeper in the soil to avoid freezing temperatures.  If you would like to encourage them to remain higher in your soil, use mulch to prevent deep freezing.  If you would rather they work deeper, and aerate subsoil layers, remove your mulches. 

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Nov. 24 - 30, 2013
Title: Mango Trees

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Looking for an interesting houseplant?  Try a mango tree.  After purchasing your mango fruit from the store, remove the seed, and let it dry overnight.  Then gently pry open the husk surrounding the seed.  Place the seed in a plastic bag surrounded by damp peat moss.  It should germinate within two or three weeks, to provide you a slow-growing, leathery-leaved tree. 

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.