May 2015 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of May 3-9, 2015
Title: “Easy Care Flowers”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Do you want an easy-maintenance garden that won’t require a lot of work every year?  Plant flowers that don’t require “deadheading” or removal of faded flowers.  These include begonia, impatiens, coleus, alyssum, lobelia, vinca, and salvia.  You’ll save time and still be rewarded with a beautiful garden.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of May 10-16, 2015
Title: “Tree Transplanting Care”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

When transplanting a balled-and-burlapped tree be careful not to damage the soil ball.  Rough handling can break off most of the roots, and the tree will die.  Don’t pick up the balled-and-burlapped tree by its trunk.  Instead, carry it carefully by the root ball, gently lowering it into the hole prepared for it.  By being careful, your tree will have a greater chance of living.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of May 17-23, 2015
Title: “Watering Beans and Peas”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Legumes such as beans and peas are able to fix their own nitrogen, reducing their need for nitrogen fertilizer.  To help this process, be sure to keep them well-watered.  Even mild water stress can significantly reduce nitrogen fixation.  As water stress increases, the weight and number of nitrogen-fixing root nodules decreases.  So keep an eye on the situation and water when needed.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of May 24-30, 2015
Title: “Sowing Small Seeds”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Small seeds which need to be evenly sowed may be seeded by using a shaker.  Often sprouting jars come with several lids with different-sized holes.  Pick one that is close to the size of the seed you intend to plant, and your problem is solved.  You may need to cover the seed with a fine layer of soil to insure proper germination.   Water lightly, and you on your way to a great garden!

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.