March 2014 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of March 2-8, 2014
Title: “Timing of Fruit Tree Pruning”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

The best time to prune fruit trees is right before they bloom, but while they are still somewhat dormant.  Be sure to remove dead, diseased or damaged wood.  Also remove shoots which either grow straight up or down, since neither bears fruit to any great extent.  Limbs which cross over in front of other branches should also be taken out, to open the tree up for light and air circulation.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of March 9-15, 2014
Title: “Peat Pots”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

If you use transplants grown in peat pots, be careful that the peat material does not stick above the soil line.  With some plants, such as tomatoes, simply bury the entire peat pot and some of the stem.  Some plants, however, should not be planted so deeply, so be sure to remove any part of the peat material which sticks above the soil.  The reason is that any part of the peat which sticks above the soil line may act as a wick and draw moisture up and away from the plant.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of March 16-22, 2014
Title: “Sunscald on New Trees”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

When planting new trees, it’s best to orient them in the same direction that they grew in the nursery.  Bark which grew on the south side of the tree in the nursery is well adapted to full sun.  If you were to plant the tree in the opposite orientation, the more tender bark from the north side of the tree might not do well when suddenly faced with strong sunlight.  Planting it the same direction will give more favorable results.  If you’re not sure, wrap the trunk in a light-colored tree wrap for the first year.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of March 23-29, 2014
Title: “Early Cannas”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

If you would like to encourage your cannas to bloom early, simply plant them in a container in a warm cellar or enclosed porch.  Use a sandy, well-drained soil mixture.  Cut each rhizome into pieces containing several buds or “eyes”.  After you are well past the last frost date in your area, you may transplant the developing plants outside, for an early bloom.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.