March 2013 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of March 3-9, 2013
Title: “Planting Trees"

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

When planting trees, it’s best to orient the tree the same way it was in the nursery.  Plant the side which faced south in the nursery so that it still faces south at your new location.  If you don’t do this, previously shaded bark will suddenly become exposed to strong sunlight and may be damaged.  If you don’t know for sure how the tree grew in the nursery, wrap the lower trunk with tree tape to reduce potential damage.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of March 10-16, 2013
Title: “Selecting Vegetable Varieties”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

When planning your vegetable garden, it’s best to stick with proven varieties for your main crop.  But I always recommend trying at least one or two new varieties each year, on a small scale, just to see how they work in your garden.  If they work well over several years, and you really like them, you may eventually replace your current varieties with something even better.

 Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of March 17-23, 2013
Title: “Asparagus Harvesting”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

If you have a large asparagus bed, and want to extend your harvest season, try leaving some of it mulched at first.  Remove the mulch from half of the bed.  This half will warm up more quickly and produce shoots sooner.  The mulched half will remain cooler, and will sprout more slowly.  After a few weeks, or if shoots start appearing in the mulched half, carefully remove the mulch and start harvesting.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of March 24-30, 2013
Title: “Pruning Fruit Trees”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

The best time to prune fruit trees is in late winter or very early spring, just before they bloom.  Remove dead or diseased wood and shoots that are growing straight up or down, or shoots that are crossing over in the way of other branches.  The goal is to open up the tree for light penetration, which will improve fruit quality and reduce disease problems.  

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.