July 2015 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of July 5-11, 2015
Title: “Potato Scab”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Potato scab can be a serious disease of potatoes, causing symptoms from brown lesions to deep pits in the tuber.  The organisms that cause potato scab live in the soil, and cause problems when the soil pH is too high.  If you have potato scab in your garden, don’t add lime.  It’s best to get a soil test to know exactly how to modify your soil.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of July 12-18, 2015
Title: “Tomato Fruit Setting Problems”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Occasionally, I will hear from a homeowner who has large, beautiful tomato plants, but little, if any, fruit.  There are a number of reasons than can cause this, but the most common is too much nitrogen.  Hold back on the fertilizer, and the problem will usually correct itself.  You can also buy fruit-setting sprays which may help.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of July 19-25, 2015
Title: “Green Grass is Not Always Best”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

It often surprises people, but a dark green grass is not necessarily the healthiest grass.  If the deep green color is due to excess nitrogen, the plant will suffer.  Excess nitrogen in grass can lead to root dieback in extreme cases, as well as susceptibility to diseases.  If you want a dark green lawn, try a fertilizer with iron in it.  But don’t overdo it.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of July 26 to August 1, 2015
Title: “Mulch Volcanoes”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Mulch is a great way to keep weeds down and conserve moisture.  But be careful with it around trees.  Many people pile it high around the trunk of the tree, in a conical shape, similar to a volcano.  This keeps the tree’s bark moist, and doesn’t allow it to dry out properly, as it should.  This makes the tree more susceptible to diseases, which could eventually lead to severe problems.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.