January 2014 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 5-11, 2014
Title: Terrariums

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Terrariums are a popular way to grow plants indoors, but after a number of years, the plants inside may overgrow the terrarium and you will need to start over.  Before replanting, be sure to wash the container in hot, soapy water.  Use new, fresh, sterilized soil and disease-free plants to get your new planting off to the best start.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 12-18, 2014
Title: Winter Cactus Care

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

During the winter, cut back on the amount of water you give your cactus plants.  Water them only enough to avoid shriveling.  They should be placed in full sun, but where the temperature will not exceed 65 degrees.  Night time temperatures should be around 40 to 50 degrees.  This will allow them to go semi-dormant, just like they would experience in their natural environment.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 19-25, 2014
Title: Extension Publications

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

When planning your garden for next year, don’t forget to call your local University of Missouri Extension office.  We have guide sheets which provide information on a wide variety of horticultural topics.  This is also a good time of the year to get a soil test through your local Extension office.  And don’t forget Extension for information on other subjects as well.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of January 26 to February 1, 2014
Title: Freeze-Thaw Cycles

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Warm winter days followed by cold winter nights create a freezing and thawing cycle that can actually push your small perennial plants right out of the soil.  Be sure to check them frequently, and push them back down firmly if you see this occur.  Be sure to cover with at least two inches of organic mulch to insure this doesn’t happen again.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.