February 2013 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of February 3-9, 2013
Title: “Dormant Oils"

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Dormant oils are specially-prepared oils which are sprayed on fruit trees to control scale insects which can damage your trees during the growing season.  I like to see them used in late winter, while the tree is still dormant, but well before leaves start to appear.  Use them according to label directions, and you should have good control of scale insects during the coming season.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of February 10-16, 2013
Title: “Freeze/Thaw”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

During the winter it’s a good idea to check your perennial plants periodically to see if the alternating cycle of freezing and thawing has pushed them out of the ground.  If they have been, their roots could dry out and the plant could die.  To remedy the situation, gently push the plant back into the soil, and replace any mulch that may have blown away.

 Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of February 17-23, 2013
Title: “Grape Pruning”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

If you have grapes, don’t wait too long to prune them.  While late winter is a good time to prune most of your fruits, grapes can “bleed” from the ends if you wait too late.  January or February is the optimal time.  And remember, grapes respond well to vigorous pruning.  Removing the right amount of old wood will invigorate them and make them more productive.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.

Horticulture Tip for the week of February 24 to March 2, 2013
Title: “Trickle Irrigation”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

In planning your garden for next spring, don’t forget about your irrigation needs.  If you’ve never used trickle irrigation before, you might want to consider adding it to gardening practices.  It will save time and water, and if used correctly can actually increase your garden yields by keeping your plants healthier and less prone to disease.  

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension.