August 2015 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of August 2-8, 2015
Title: “Saving Seed”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Many gardeners extend their love of gardening by saving seed from their vegetables and flowers each year.  Some even join organizations such as the Seed Saver’s Exchange which allows them to find seeds of varieties which are no longer commercially available.  Saving seed is easy if you know what to do.  Call your local Extension office, and we’ll be happy to send you some information to get you started.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of August 9-15, 2015
Title: “Plant Diagnostics”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

For the most part, gardens and ornamental plants around your yard are easy to grow.  But from time to time, plant diseases and insects can throw off your plans for a beautiful garden.  When problems arise, be sure to contact your local University of Missouri Extension office.  We have the knowledge and resources to help solve your problem.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of August 16-22, 2015
Title: “Herbicide Injury”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Be careful when using herbicides around your yard.  Under the right conditions, the weed killer you use may drift onto plants that you hadn’t intended and cause injury.  Even when the wind isn’t blowing, some herbicides may volatilize and cause problems.  Be especially careful with weed-and-feed lawn fertilizers.  The weed killer in it may harm woody plants if you get it too close.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of August 23-29, 2015
Title: “Blossom End Rot”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Tomatoes are sometimes plagued with a condition called Blossom End Rot.  Typically, you will see a rotten area on the tomato fruit, at the end of the fruit directly opposite from the stem, where the blossom used to be attached.  This is not caused by a disease organism, so spraying won’t help.  To control blossom end rot, water consistently as possible avoiding very wet or very dry soil.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.