August 2013 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Aug. 4 - 10, 2013
Title: Fall Vegetable Gardens

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

The months of July and August are the time to think about a fall vegetable garden.  To know when to plant, look up the average number of days it takes your vegetable variety to mature.  Then add a few more weeks, just in case you get an early frost.  Take that total, and count backwards from the average first frost date in your area, and that will be your planting date. 

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Aug. 11 - 17, 2013
Title: Deep Cultivation

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

During the hot dry days of summer, it’s best not to cultivate your garden too deeply.  This practice increases water loss, and may damage roots.  The loss of roots due to deep cultivation will make it difficult for the plant to keep up with its water needs on hot days, even when you apply water.  It’s best to use mulch for weed control, and mulching will conserve water too.

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Aug. 18 - 24, 2013
Title: Lawn Fertilization

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

When fertilizing your lawn, you can save time and money by only fertilizing when your lawn needs it.  For cool season grasses such as bluegrass and fescue, fertilize in the fall and early spring.  It’s best to get a soil test so that you will know exactly what your soil needs.  The soil test will also tell you if your soil needs lime, and if so, how much to add. 

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension

Horticulture Tip for the week  of Aug. 25 - 31, 2013
Title: Storing Herbs

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

If you prefer that “fresh” flavor from you herbs, compared to their dried taste, one way to preserve that flavor for winter use is to freeze the herbs in water in ice cube trays.  Simply put a few chopped-up leaves in an ice cube tray, add water, and freeze.  Once they’re frozen, store them in plastic bags in the freezer.  When you’re ready to use them, just add them to the meal you are preparing.  They work best in dishes that require extra water. 

Tim Baker, University of Missouri Extension