April 2015 Horticulture Tips

Tim Baker, MU Extension Horticulture Specialist
102 N. Main, Suite 1, Gallatin, MO 64640
660-663-3232, bakert@missouri.edu

Horticulture Tip for the week of April 5-11, 2015
Title: “Fertilizing Flowers”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

To get your flower bed off to a good start this year, fertilize it with a general purpose complete fertilizer such as 10-10-10.  Use about five pounds per 1000 square feet.  In addition, be sure to water it carefully when needed, keep the weeds out, and you will be rewarded with a beautiful show of flowers this summer.

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of April 12-18, 2015
Title: “Cultivating Your Garden”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

While cultivating your vegetable garden is a time-honored practice for many people, you have to be careful.  Cultivating and deep hoeing can cause damage to roots near the soil surface, and set your vegetables back.  You may also bring weed seeds to the surface by cultivating, allowing them to germinate.  For most vegetable gardens, it’s better to use a shallow hoe to kill weeds and then mulch with several inches of good mulch. 

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of April 19-25, 2015
Title: “Vegetable Gardening in a Small Space”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

Some vegetables are noted for requiring lots of space for their vines to grow.  If you are short on space, you can still grow many of them.  Bush varieties are available for plants such as green beans and winter squash.  By selecting these varieties, you can grow them in small areas or even containers and still be rewarded with fresh vegetables from your garden. 

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.

 

Horticulture Tip for the week of April 26 to May 2, 2015
Title: “Hydrangeas”

Here’s a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension:

To transplant a gift hydrangea, wait until the weather is warm, and select a site that has a well-drained soil and full sun to partial shade.  But don’t be surprised if the color is not the same as the original bloom.  The flower color of colored hydrangeas is dependent on soil pH.  Alkaline soil produces pink flowers, and acid soil produces blue flowers.  White hydrangeas will stay white, no matter what the soil pH. 

This has been Tim Baker, with a Horticulture Tip from University of Missouri Extension.