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MU Extension team recognized for improving tall fescue production

Writer:

Eileen Yager
Editor
MU Extension Web Publishing Team
Phone: 573-882-0604
Email: yagere@umsystem.edu

Photo available for this release:

Michael Ouart, MU vice provost and director of extension; Amie Scheicher; Jim Humphrey; Wayne Flanary and Randa Doty

Credit: University of Missouri Cooperative Media Group

Published: Thursday, Nov. 12, 2009

Story source:

Barb Casady, 573-882-2003

COLUMBIA, Mo. — A group of University of Missouri faculty members from northwest Missouri received the Extension Teamwork Award for an educational program to improve tall fescue production and reduce feed costs for cattle producers.

The faculty team established demonstration plots at MU’s Hundley-Whaley Center near Albany to demonstrate how legumes can reduce nitrogen fertilizer needs, how timing changes in nitrogen application can improve forage production and how to manage endophyte-infected fescue.

During 2008, when nitrogen prices were high, the demonstrations showed overseeding tall fescue with common red clover increased forage value by $103 per acre compared to no added fertility, and by $148 per acre compared to March nitrogen application.

Results were compiled into “Improving Tall Fescue Production in Northwest Missouri with Legumes and Timing of Nitrogen Application: A Producer’s Guide,” which provides economic comparisons, recommendations and management strategies.

Members of the team include Wayne Flanary of Oregon and Heather Benedict of Bethany, agronomy specialists; Shawn Deering of Albany, Jim Humphrey of Savannah and Amie Schleicher of Rock Port, livestock specialists; Randa Doty of Maryville, ag business specialist; Bruce Burdick, Hundley-Whaley superintendent; Rob Kallenbach, state extension forage specialist.

The team continues its work, looking at nutrient values, endophyte testing and other areas to further aid in producing high-quality forages and reducing feed costs.

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