Note

Download a brochure and enrollment form (PDF)

All courses will meet at the Waters-Moss Memorial Wildlife Preservation Area, primarily in the Moss Building and occasionally in the Hillcrest Community Center unless otherwise indicated.

Contact Osher@Mizzou

Email Osher@Mizzou.edu or call 573-882-8189.

To register for classes, call 573-882-8189.

Wednesday courses

We're All Prejudiced, So What Are We Going to Do about It? Investigating Prejudice, Power and Privilege [4 sessions]

Time
10 a.m.–noon

Location
Moss A

Dates
June 7, 14, 21, 28

Description
It's impossible to be unbiased. Be honest: what is the first thought that comes to mind when you think "CEO"? Were you thinking of a white middle-aged or older man in a suit? If that's the stereotype in your mind, you're not entirely to blame. We live in a stew of stereotypes — in a world that privileges some groups of people over others, based on characteristics over which we have little or no control, such as gender, age, race, sexual orientation and more. This course examines ways that personal and societal prejudices intersect with who has power and privilege in America. The course begins with a documentary about the internment of Japanese and Japanese-Americans during World War II, providing insight into what it means to be considered an outsider. A second film explores images of Arabs in film. A third documentary presents one of America's leading anti-racist writers and speakers, Tim Wise, discussing white privilege. The final class synthesizes what participants learned from films and class discussions to determine how to best deal with the reality that we live in a world where power and privilege are conferred in large part based on the groups we belong to and attributes not of our own making.

Instructor
Nancy F. Browning, professor emeritus of cultural diversity, taught the general education course, "CD 200: Cultural Diversity in Modern America," to thousands of students at Lincoln University of Missouri for 16 years. In her retirement, she divides her time among many pursuits: writing that ranges from picture books to young adult and middle grade fiction to adult short stories, cooking gluten-free and creating a gluten-free cookbook, editing scientific grants and papers, practicing yoga, walking, working on every kind of needlework imaginable, singing, antiquing, and spending time with her friends, family and cat ­­— and, of course, attending and teaching Osher classes.

Children's Literature for Older Adults [4 sessions]

Time
1–2:30 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
June 7, 14, 21, 28

Description
Children's literature today offers many examples of excellent writing and illustration that can be enjoyed by all ages. For older adults who are looking for something to read with their grandchildren or simply enjoy the variety of children's books, this brief overview will focus on some of the best of the best. The course examines the Newbery Award winners and honor books, the Caldecott Medal winners and honor books, as well as outstanding books in science, technology and math (STEM), particularly books that help children understand the solar eclipse.

Instructor
Diane Peterson spent 31 years as a school librarian and teacher. Children's literature has been a lifelong passion. Peterson has earned a BSEd in elementary education and English, a MEd in elementary education and a MAT in educational technology.

The American Presidents II [4 sessions]

Time
2:30–4 p.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
June 7, 14, 21, 28

Description
This summer session will cover the era surrounding the Civil War, including Presidents Pierce, Buchanan, Lincoln, Johnson and Hayes. Participants will examine the people who have served as president, their family background, education and previous experience in search of clues that may help anticipate who will be successful presidents and who will not in the future.

Instructor
Jay Ward was born in Springfield, Mo., and raised in Lexington, Mo. He was an undergraduate at Northwestern University and received a medical degree from the University of Missouri at Columbia. Retiring from medicine after 30 years, he received an MA and a PhD in the history of the United States from MU.