Note

Download a brochure and enrollment form (PDF)

All courses will meet at the Waters-Moss Memorial Wildlife Preservation Area, primarily in the Moss Building and occasionally in the Hillcrest Community Center unless otherwise indicated.

Contact Osher@Mizzou

Email Osher@Mizzou.edu or call 573-882-8189.

To register for classes, call 573-882-8189.

Tuesday courses

Light Eclipsing Darkness: Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray" [4 sessions]

Time
9:30–11 a.m.

Location
Hillcrest C

Dates
June 6, 13, 20, 27

Description
During this summer's solar eclipse, darkness will block the light of the sun. Such an image can be a metaphor for life, as can its reverse. In his novel "The Picture of Dorian Gray," Oscar Wilde meditates on a life in which light — physical beauty, charm, wit — eclipses the darkness or evil of the human soul. The novel can be read as an indictment of the artificiality of the late Victorian era or as Wilde's autobiographical exploration of his homosexuality. The course investigates these and other thematic possibilities through reading the novel and viewing a film adaptation. If possible, class members should read the unabridged original version of "The Picture of Dorian Gray." An edition, edited by Nicholas Frankel, is available in print and e-book versions.

Instructor
Clarence Wolfshohl is professor emeritus of English at William Woods University in Fulton, Mo. His poetry, creative nonfiction and literary articles have appeared in many small press and scholarly journals in print and online. Recent work includes reviews of William Heyen's "Crazy Horse & the Custers" in Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review. His latest published poetry is the e-book "Scattering Ashes" from Virtual Artists Collective.

Health and Wellness Series [4 sessions]

Time
10:30–noon

Location
Moss A

Dates
June 6, 13, 20, 27

Coordinator
Osher Program Committee

June 6 and 27
Writing Your Medical Memoir

Description
Sheila Bailey and Caya Tanski-French will guide you in writing your health history. Having a health history can be beneficial to family, medical physicians, homeopaths, naturopathic doctors and to yourself as a way to process health challenges. In the first class, participants will explore ways to bring out memories and to write them. You will then have three weeks to write. In the second class, we will review what was written (sharing is optional). Tanski will help participants understand how a naturopath and a homeopath might use the health history to develop a natural health protocol.

Instructors
Shelia Bailey has written 70 stories about herself and her family, studied memoir writing and taught an Osher memoir writing class.

Caya Tanski-French, ND (CTN), PhD, specializes in homeopathy, BodyTalk, and Emotional Freedom Technique and the use of herbal and nutritional supplements depending on the person's need. Her focus is on addressing the root causes of illness — mental/emotional, genetic, environmental, infectious, lifestyle or other.

June 13
Helping Yourself to a Healthy Home

Description
Mike Heimos, stormwater educator with the City of Columbia's Stormwater Education and Outreach Program, will share ideas on ways to clean your home without the use of harsh or potentially dangerous chemicals.

Instructor
Mike Heimos is with the City of Columbia's Stormwater Education and Outreach Program that helps educate local residents about topics such as what stormwater is, how it becomes polluted and how individuals can help protect our local streams, creeks and recreational waterways.

June 20
Good Oral Health for Total Health

Description
Charles Mayo, one of the Mayo Clinic founders, stated, "Preventative dentistry can expand human life 10 years." Research is constantly validating this statement. We cannot have total health without good oral health. This presentation discusses the interrelationships of oral and total health and the effects of medical treatment on the oral cavity. Information on correct oral care and dental products will also be shared.

Instructor
Cheryl Spiller is trained in clinical preventive dentistry, adult education, hospital dentistry and geriatric dentistry.

Techniques for Observing the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse [4 sessions]

Time
12:30–2 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
June 6, 13, 20, 27

Description
The Aug. 21 total solar eclipse offers a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for mid-Missourians to experience one of nature's most awe-inspiring sights. No one who has seen a total solar eclipse ever forgets it, and many are so taken with what they see that they travel to the sites of other total eclipses to experience again the wonders of the moon and the sun. If you know in advance what is likely to happen, you can better prepare. This four-session course will take a second-by-second look at an eclipse and what a viewer should try to see and experience throughout, including what to expect the day of the eclipse itself during the partial phases, as well as the 2 minutes and 37 seconds after totality. The course will also cover safe viewing, availalble filters, simple projection techniques and safe use of binoculars. Children are fascinated by an eclipse, and a simple and safe projection device can add a lot to the excitement of the event. Attendees of this course will be more than ready to enjoy August's eclipse — truly an experience of a lifetime.

Instructor
Val Germann bought his first telescope in 1966 and has been hooked on the sky ever since. Two-time chairman of the Mid States Region of the Astronomical League, now retired, Germann is on the volunteer staff of the University of Missouri's Laws Observatory. Germann, an MU grad, taught astronomy for 20 years at Columbia College in Columbia, Mo., and also was involved with optical-related businesses for more than a decade. Val is married and has a daughter, now in graduate school in Los Angeles. As a U.S. Army veteran serving in Vietnam and Germany, he took every opportunity to observe and photograph the sky in both locations.

William Blake: The Moon, the Sun, and the Power of Poetry [4 sessions]

Time
1:30–3 p.m.

Location
Hillcrest C

Dates
June 6, 13, 20, 27

Description
What could William Blake have meant when he wrote these lines?

"For every Space larger than a red Globule of Mans blood,
Is visionary: and is created by the Hammer of Los
And every Space smaller than a Globule of Mans blood open
Into Eternity of which this vegetable Earth is but a shadow:
The red Globule is the unwearied Sun by Los created
To measure Time and Space to mortal Men..."
(Milton, pl. 29, ll. 19-24)

How do the words tell us anything about a solar eclipse? This course explores Blake's poetic and visual arts related to the sun, the moon, light, shadow, good, evil. The coming of darkness, the casting of shadows and the emergence of light are all pervasive images in Blake's work, so there are plenty of passages and images to discuss. Blake is sometimes identified as one of the anti-Newtonian thinkers of his time, so some science talk may impinge. The instructor will provide texts for the works studied. Several fine editions of Blake's complete or selected poems are available for those who want to study his work extensively.

Instructor
Thomas F. Dillingham, PhD, earned his bachelor's degree at Princeton University (1962) and his doctorate at Boston University (1973). His dissertation was "'Gravity and Waggery': A Study of Christopher Smart's 'The Works of Horace' Translated Into Verse'." He was a member of the English Department at Stephens College in Columbia, Mo., from 1971 to 2001, and is emeritus associate professor of English at Central Methodist University in Fayette, Mo., where he taught from 2002 to 2006. He has published essays and reviews on 18th century and contemporary poetry, folklore, mythology and science fiction.

Islam: The Misunderstood Religion; Fact and Fiction [4 sessions]

Time
2:30–4 p.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
June 6, 13, 20, 27

Description
The basic teaching of Islam is derived from two sources: Qur'an and the traditions of prophet Muhammad (peace and blessing of God be upon him). Islam established a tradition of Taslim (submission) and Salam (peace) and it is, in essence, an integrated, comprehensive ideology or guide that governs the relationships between all of our fellow human beings, nature and the Creator. This course will serve as a starting point for clarifying misunderstanding about this global faith — the youngest of the three major monotheistic religions — by highlighting its social, cultural, moral and ethical values and explaining the Qur'anic verses that are commonly misinterpreted and quoted out of context.

Instructor
A graduate of Brown University, A. Rashed Nizam, MD, is a board certified ophthalmologist and founding director of Mid Missouri Eye Center in Moberly, Mo. He is the president of the North American Bangladeshi Islamic Community (NABIC); a past member of the board of director of Islamic Society of Northern America (ISNA); past chairman, Islamic Center of Central Missouri; and past chairman, board of the Islamic School of Columbia-Missouri.