Note

Download a brochure and enrollment form (PDF)

All courses will meet at the Waters-Moss Memorial Wildlife Preservation Area, primarily in the Moss Building and occasionally in the Hillcrest Community Center unless otherwise indicated.

Contact Osher@Mizzou

Email Osher@Mizzou.edu or call 573-882-8189.

To register for classes, call 573-882-8189.

Thursday courses

Introduction to Energy Medicine [6 sessions]

Time
9:30–11 a.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19

Description
A Western-trained physician meets the healing traditions of the East, focusing on how to increase longevity, happiness and zest for life. This interactive course is about more than diet and exercise to keep you fit and your mind sharp. We will reconnect body, mind and spirit in each session through gentle stretching, energy techniques and stress relaxation exercises. The course also explores the healing power of sound and creativity and easy ways to tap into higher levels of consciousness to reach the peace and joy that are your birthright. This beginning course gives participants the background to take the advanced course offered in spring.

Instructor
Karen R. Onofrio, MD, an artist and former pathologist, continues to deepen her knowledge and understanding of the human body and spirit. She is an Eden Energy Medicine certified practitioner, Authorized Energy Medicine for Women class instructor, Usui Reiki Level 1 Certified, a Free Soul instructor and a HealthRhythms trained facilitator. She has recently taken Wisdom Healing Qigong classes from Master Mingtong Gu.

Travels with Sharon [8 sessions]

Time
10 a.m.–12 p.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
Sept. 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26, Nov. 2

  • Sept. 14 and 21
    The Stans of Central Asia

    Journey into Central Asia's heartland and uncover the rich legacy of the Silk Road. Discover Turkmenistan's unique white-marbled capital of Ashgabat. Tour Uzbekistan's ancient reconstructed cities where the four Ms — mosques, minarets, madrassahs and mausoleums — dominate the stunning scenery; and where hospitality reigns supreme. Cross the mountains into Tajikistan, venture into bazaars that drew ancient caravans and jam with local musicians on antique instruments.
  • Sept. 28 and Oct. 5 
    Rome, Tuscany, the Alps and the Riviera
    One of the miracles of Italy is that a relatively small country contains such a wealth of stunning scenery and beautiful cities. Starting in Rome, we'll visit the ancient monuments of the vast Roman Empire standing side-by-side with the wonders of the Renaissance and Vatican City. Traveling through Tuscany, we'll discover Orvieto's ancient charms and Florence's Renaissance treasures. With brief stops in Siena and Pisa, we'll arrive in the Italian Riviera including the rugged hillside villages of the Cinque Terre. Then we'll travel high into South Tyrol to Bolzano, surrounded by the dramatic peaks of the Dolomites. In Venice, we'll vicariously visit famed cathedrals, meander through narrow side streets, ride on the canals, attend concerts and buy Murano glass jewelry.
  • Oct. 12 and 19
    The Best of Eastern Europe

    This provocative tour starts in Berlin with a focus on the city's reconstruction since World War II and the impact of the Berlin Wall, with a stop in Potsdam for a review of the decisions made there. In Poland, we will relive the destruction of Warsaw, its Russian occupation and its rebirth since independence. Krakow and its Old Town dating to Medieval times was the chosen city of the Germans and sustained no bombing during World War II. The cathedral in the Wieliczka salt mines and the UNESCO Heritage site at Auschwitz/Birkenau are heart-wrenching. We briefly visit the highlights of Prague and Budapest, ending with an evening cruise on the Danube River.
  • Oct. 26
    Martin Luther: Treasures of the Reformation Exhibition

    Virtually tour the "Martin Luther: Treasures of the Reformation" exhibition at the Minneapolis Institute of Art through a Power Point presentation with slides and commentary about most of the 400-plus artifacts on display. As the exhibition overview notes: "Five hundred years ago, one man took a stand that shook Europe and changed the world. Now you can see the story of Martin Luther and the Reformation brought to life through astonishing artworks and historical objects, traveling outside Germany for the first time ever."
  • Nov. 2
    Class choice TBD
    Description

Instructor
World traveler Sharon Kinden has visited 75 countries and all seven continents. Whether you want to travel vicariously, investigate interesting future destinations or relive fond memories of your own past adventures, you will enjoy "Travels With Sharon" told through stunning photography and rousing tales.

Mah-Jongg [8 sessions]

Time
10–11:30 a.m.

Location
Hillcrest D

Dates
Sept. 14, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26, Nov. 2, 9

Description
Mah-jongg is a Chinese gambling game played with three to four players. Skill and intelligence are required; luck plays a part. Some say mah-jongg originated around the time of Confucius, about 500 B.C.; some even say that he invented the game that originally was exclusive to the royal class. Commoners who dared play faced decapitation. Eventually, the penalty was lifted, and the game became popular among all classes. The game was introduced to United States in 1920, with English translations provided on the tiles. In the late 1920s, its popularity waned but enjoyed a resurgence during the Depression due, it's thought, to the mental stimulation it offered. Enthusiasts today invite you to learn to play and keep this ancient cognitive challenge alive and thriving. There will be a $10 materials fee for this session.

Instructor
Dee Dee Strnad is a retired Columbia Public Schools teacher with a master's degree in special education. She taught at West Junior High for 19 years and has been playing Mah-jongg for about 20 years. She plays weekly with a group of friends and has taught the game to many retired teachers. Strnad remembers hearing her mother and her friends calling out tile names when she was a child and feels a connection to the past and closeness to her late mother as she plays with that same Mah-jongg set.

Vignettes in Mathematics [8 sessions]

Time
10:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

Location
Hillcrest C

Dates
Sept. 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26, Nov. 2

Description
Using "Professor Stewart's Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities" by Ian Stewart, we will ponder pieces of insightful mathematics, including CAT scans, infinity, unsolved problems, Bayes' idea, Magic Squares and more. Prerequisite: Arithmetic and a long forgotten smattering of ninth-grade algebra.

Instructor
Dennis Sentilles, emeritus professor of mathematics at the University of Missouri, is the author of two books and several noted research discoveries.

Bookends: Exploring Systemic Injustice and Its Everyday Effects [6 sessions]

Time
1:30–3 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26

Description
This dialogue-based program will use two books, "The New Jim Crow" by Michelle Alexander and "World on Fire" by Amy Chua, to explore systemic injustice and how inequities in our social structures affect individuals, families, communities and our democracy. Facilitated small-group dialogue will be integrated into these sessions, using structured formats designed to promote listening and civil interaction among participants.

  • Sept. 21
    What Is Systemic Injustice? Concepts and Definitions

    This session starts with an overview of the concept of systemic injustice and how it relates to the themes and conclusions of each book. We will review dialogue basics and use a small-group dialogue to explore this issue. Come listen, share and learn with and from others in your community.
  • Sept. 28 and Oct. 5
    The New Jim Crow: Considering The Every Day Effects of Political and Racial Injustice

    These sessions will review stories and statistics in "The New Jim Crow," as well as statistics from our own state and community. We will explore participants' thoughts and experiences in the "listening circle" format for structured small-group dialogues.
  • Oct. 12 and 19
    World On Fire: Considering the Every Day Effects of Economic and Political Injustice 

    Drawing from the examples and research in "World On Fire," these sessions will use the "Conversation Cafe" format to explore the book's conclusions and thoughts on how they relate to our world today.
  • Oct. 26
    It's Systemic! What Can Just One Citizen Do? 

    Using a "World Cafe" format to generate ideas for how individuals might make a difference, this session will review the role of the citizen in remedying systemic injustice and the use of dialogue and available resources.

Instructor
Sarah J. Read has more than 25 years as an attorney, mediator, facilitator and consultant in conflict resolution processes working with businesses, nonprofits, community groups, educational institutions and governmental organizations. She has helped to resolve business and community disputes and to design and facilitate dialogues on energy and other issues. A neutral with the American Arbitration Association, Read has served on the Missouri Supreme Court Commission on Alternative Dispute Resolution and received the President's Award from the Association of Missouri Mediators. She worked with the Kettering Foundation and Columbia Daily Tribune in developing the "Are We An Us?" community dialogue guide. She runs a blog and has published several e-books on dialogue and has taught public policy dispute resolution at the MU School of Law. Read received her Bachelor of Arts cum laude from Yale University and her Juris Doctor degree with the Order of the Coif from the University of Wisconsin. She practiced for many years in Chicago with Sidley Austin LLP.

Films of the 1960s [5 sessions]

Time
1:30–3:30 p.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
Oct. 12, 19, 26, Nov. 2, 9

Description
This course covers the art of filmmaking and the film industry as a reflection of popular audience values and social ideologies. All opinions and value judgments are encouraged. The choices of the films are all mine, and sniveling about the choices will not be allowed.

Instructor
John Blakemore spent 11 years in the advertising agency business in New York City, Detroit and St Louis, managing the Coca-Cola Export, Gillette International, Buick Motor Division and Ralston Purina accounts in one capacity or another. He ran his own advertising and public relations firm in Columbia for 11 years. He also spent 19 years as a professor of mass communication at Stephens College. As department chair, he created the film and the Marketing: Advertising and Public Relations majors. He currently serves on the Osher@Mizzou advisory board and the Community Foundation of Central Missouri board.

The Vulnerable Long-Distance Migration of the Monarch Butterfly [2 sessions]

Time
1:30–3 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Nov. 2, 9

Description
The Monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is the best known butterfly in North America because of its annual long-distance migration. In the summer, Monarchs can be seen in open habitat from southern Canada southward. In the fall, they migrate to overwinter in Mexico. In spring, they begin their migration north, with females laying eggs on milkweed plants, the only host plant for the Monarch caterpillar. Remarkably, Monarchs that return to the overwintering sites in the fall are a few generations removed from the butterflies that left those sites in the spring. This migration is under threat; the Monarch population in decline. This course will consider the reasons for this threat — mainly due to the loss of the butterfly's caterpillar and adult habitat — and ways to increase its population through programs like Monarch Watch and Monarch Way Station.

Instructor
G. Michael Chippendale is a professor emeritus of entomology at the University of Missouri's College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. He received his Bachelor of Science degree from Manchester University, England; his Master of Science degree from the University of Waterloo, Canada; and his doctorate from the University of Wisconsin. At MU, he led the insect physiology laboratory which focused on studying the relationship of plant-feeding insects to their hosts. A fellow of the Entomological Society of America, Chippendale brings to the course years of experience in research and teaching in the biological sciences, as well as a desire to publicize and support the need to protect biodiversity.