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Details

All Osher at Mizzou courses will meet at the Moss Building about 1/3 mile from the Stadium/Old Highway 63 intersection. Turn on Hillcrest Drive. The Moss Building (Osher at Mizzou) and the Hillcrest Community Center will be on the left. The Moss Building entrance is located on the east side. Parking is conveniently located.

As a registered student in our program, you may request a library card for use in the MU Libraries. Should you wish a library card, please apply through our office.

If the Columbia School System cancels classes, the Osher classes, too, will not meet on that day.

Contact Osher at Mizzou

Email learnforlife@missouri.edu
Call 573-882-2585.

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Special Events
The Brown Bag Seminars 8 sessions

  • Dates
    March 14, 21; April 4, 11, 18, 25; May 2, 9 [No class March 28, Spring Break]
  • Time
    11:15-12:45 p.m.

Bees and Beekeeping in the Americas, Part 2

Date
March 14

Descriptions
Honeybees and beekeeping have a rich history in the Americas that predates the arrival of European settlers. Honeybees have long been recognized for their importance in natural and agroecosystems for pollination as well as for their production of honey, mead, and wax that have been exploited by humans.

The Mayans in Central America have a documented record of beekeeping with stingless bees. The timeline of the great Mayan civilization is generally recognized as 1800 BCE through Pre-Classic, Classic and Post-Classic periods to 1500 CE. Evidence for Mayan beekeeping is presented in the Codex Tro-Cortesianus (the Madrid Codex) that was produced between 1200 and 1450 CE. Stingless bee colonies, most notably, Melipona, were kept in log hives primarily for their honey and wax production. The Maya also produced a fermented drink from diluted honey for consumption at rituals and ceremonies. Chetumal on the mainland in the Yucatan Peninsula and the Island of Cozumel were important centers for the culture of stingless bees, or meliponiculture.

European settlers introduced the honeybee, Apis mellifera, into the US in the early 17th Century. Through swarming and human intervention, the honeybee gradually spread throughout the Americas. Today, many essential crops in the US are dependent on honeybee pollination. Beekeeping with Apis mellifera has now largely displaced beekeeping with stingless bees in Central America.

Lorenzo Langstroth (1810-1895) was an early and influential beekeeper in the US. He was born in Philadelphia. In 1853, he published the ‘Hive and the Honeybee’ that became a key practical guide to beekeeping. Langstroth used the concept of the bee space to develop a moveable-frame hive that is still the standard beehive in use today.

In recent years, beekeeping in the Americas has been challenged by events that have captured the attention of the public and made headline news. These include (1) the increased presence of varroa mites that have seriously weakened honeybee colonies and contribute to colony collapse disorder, and (2) the migration of the Africanized bee, Apis mellifera scutellata, from Brazil to the US. This honeybee subspecies more aggressively defends its nest that does the European subspecies that was introduced into Virginia by the early settlers.

This seminar is Part 2 of Dr. Chippendale’s series, which began in the winter intersession. These topics and others related to the importance of bees to the ecosystem and to humans in the Americas will be elaborated upon in this seminar.

Instructor
G. Michael Chippendale, PhD, professor emeritus entomology, MU

Road Trip! Author Shares Humor and Insight about Show-Me Folks

Date
March 21

Descriptions
John Robinson, a former Missouri director of tourism, puts a different spin on the traditional road trip. Over 13 years, he drove every mile of every road on the Missouri state highway map. With an irreverent sense of humor – Robinson compares his unconventional journey to mowing a 68,000-square-mile lawn — he and his car (his only constant companion on this odyssey) traveled the back roads to discover the real America beyond the interstate. Real people. Obscure places. Forgotten facts. “My car and I covered more miles than the combined travels of Marco Polo and Magellan, Columbus and Zebulon Pike, Lewis and Clark and Dr. Livingstone. The only difference between us and those other explorers is that their amazing feats of bravery, skill and sacrifice changed the world. We just drove around. A lot.”

The session will cover the origins and evolution of Robinson’s epic journey, as well as the unique problems encountered along the way, and the challenges he faced when he sat down to write about the odyssey.

“...we’ve dodged rabbits and turtles, texters and drunks. We’ve slid sideways in sleet, jumped curbs and low-water crossings. We’ve passed every pun on every roadside marquee, every time and temperature sign, every clip joint and carny barker and corn dog vendor, every barbecue shack and Tex-Mex taco stand. And we’ve stopped at most of ’em.”

Whether he's uncovering tombstone histories or sitting down to a blue plate lunch, Robinson relays his encounters in a relaxed storytelling style. His journey unfolds in Missouri, but it could be about any state, any traveler who drives into America's hidden heart. “Somebody convinced the New York Times not to raft the Mississippi. But a Saturday Night Live producer did it. I rode along.”

“They're stories you might not expect to hear from a former state tourism director,” Robinson admits. He shares his irreverent glimpses of his beloved state in two books he wrote about the experience: A Road Trip Into America's Hidden Heart, and Coastal Missouri. ”They're not travel guides,” Robinson warns. “They're road experiences, with a lot of history, culture and fun mixed in. After all, isn't that why we travel?”

The books are not required for the session, but would be helpful in course discussion. Also, consult John's blog at: http://johndrakerobinson.com/blog/ Books are available three ways: 1) at Yellow Dog Book Shop on 9th Street in downtown Columbia; 2) online at Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble; or 3) by contacting John Robinson: cjrobin@socket.net or 573-694-5555.

Instructor
John Robinson comes from a family of teachers. And they taught him to be observant. They just didn't realize what he would end up studying. In a bizarre experiment that lasted 13 years, he drove every mile of every road on his state highway map. In two insightful books, he recorded what he saw. Robinson served four years as Missouri's official travel promoter. He's spent much longer — his whole life — studying Missouri customs, culture and history, weaving them into stories that probably won't show up in a high school history test. You can follow his journey, and find his favorite spots. But these books are not travel guides. They're commentaries on life. He penetrated beyond the edges of civilization, peeked into the real American heartland, and lived to tell about it. Called the King of the Road by Missouri Life, Robinson lives in Columbia, Missouri when he isn't sleeping in his car. His articles and columns are regularly featured in a half dozen magazines. A native Missourian, He graduated from Mizzou J-School, Watergate Class, and has taught a course in sustainable tourism at Mizzou. He has served as chief of staff for two Missouri lieutenant governors, and deputy chief of staff for one governor.

Optimizing Proper Digestion

Date
April 4

Instructor
Laura Lee Brown, grew up as the youngest of nine with two parents who showed her the way to a healthy living. After running track for MU, she became a certified personal trainer, whole food cook, and a healthy lifestyle coach. Currently, she is proprietor of Laura Lee’s Healthy Plate.

Watching Butterflies, Dragonflies and More

Date
April 11

Descriptions
Learn differences between butterflies and moths and between dragonflies and damselflies. Get introduced to fascinating Missouri insects you may never have heard of even though they live right outside your home. People often watch nature documentaries featuring wildlife from other continents, never realizing that they could see the same biological interactions in person.

Join Brunet for an introduction to incorporate watching insects into walking, hiking, gardening and even just relaxing in your back yard. View a selection of photographs at http://donnabrunet.com where you can also download insect checklists, coloring sheets and more.

Instructor
Donna Brunet, a free-lance nature photographer with a gallery in Orr Street Studios in Columbia, specializes in macro images of insects and wildflowers. Many birders added butterflies to their wildlife watching activities in recent years, now dragonfly watching is experiencing rapid growth.

The Chapters of Rock Bridge Memorial State Park — and the Vision of the Movers and Shakers Who Brought the Park into Being

Date
April 18

Descriptions
Rock Bridge Memorial State Park has a wide variety of natural resources and ways people have valued the park at different periods of history, each of which could be considered a chapter of a book. Enjoy an overview of the chapters in the book when park naturalist Roxie Campbell uses PowerPoint to show many photos and share information about these aspects of the park: human history, founding of the park, how people enjoy the park, Devil’s Icebox Cave, karst topography, cave animals, woodlands, prairies, streams, ponds, glades, wildlife and how the park is managed.

Roxie Campbell, the park naturalist at Rock Bridge Memorial State Park, managed by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. She grew up on a 66 acre farm near Bellflower, Missouri, the youngest of 6 kids. He father was a rural mail carrier. She was a tom-boy who liked to climb trees, explore the woods and identify the birds she saw. She has a B.S. in Forestry from the University of Missouri. In addition to her love for nature, she wanted to help others learn about and appreciate nature, so she sought to become a park naturalist. She worked as a tour guide at Watkins Woolen Mill State Historic Site before transferring to and working at Prairie State Park for 3.5 years. She has been the park naturalist at Rock Bridge Memorial State Park for the past 22 years. She enjoys the variety of duties that range from interpretive programs and cave tours for children to monitoring rare cave animals to leading in prescribed burns and supervising volunteers.

Instructor
Mark Foreman, secretary of the original board, will share his personal and historic account of the founding of the park — hear first-hand from a person who was there from the start of the creation of the Park.

The History and Design of Upholstered Furniture

Date
April 25

Note
This class meets at 9:30 to 11 a.m. an earlier time than usual

Descriptions
The first signs of comfort for chairs came with the making of cushions, but it was not until the reign of Queen Elizabeth I that the stuffing of furniture began to evolve. From then on the craft of upholstery increased and was in great demand, reaching its zenith probably in the late Victorian era and early Edwardian days. http://www.oldandsold.com/articles05/upholstery1.shtml

Join us to learn about the history of upholstered furniture in Europe and North America from the 1600s to the present. You are likely to acquire highly useful information about varieties of furniture-stuffing materials, knowledge of construction, then and now, the complexity of fabric covers and, most importantly, it is rumored that you will come away with the ability to spot the good stuff at stores and auctions.

Instructor
Ralph Terwelp, proprietor of Terwelp’s Upholstery

Our Presidents in Verse

Date
May 2

Descriptions
An informal discussion about our forty-three Presidents of the United States will include the following topics:

  • Discussion of the various theories of presidential power as manifested by certain office-holders
  • How professional historians and political scientists rank our presidents
  • How would the members of the class rank the presidents?

Instructor
Fred Spiegel, MU professor emeritus of political science

Walt Disney, Part II: The saga of the making of Disney film, Mary Poppins

Date
May 9

Instructor
Dan Viets, attorney, is co-author of the book Walt Disney's Missouri: The Roots of a Creative Genius and a member of the Missouri Humanities Council's Speakers Bureau. He has made presentations to Walt Disney Co. employees in California and in Florida. He is president of the group which is preserving and restoring the building in Kansas City, Missouri where Disney's first professionalfilm studio operated.

Note
Viets presentation will be followed by the film, Saving Mr. Banks, at 1:30 PM. A brief review of the film follows.

A Review of Saving Mr. Banks
Saving Mr. Banks is a fascinating look at the circuitous "collaborative" process Walt Disney, his creative team, and author P.L. Travers engaged in in bringing the character Mary Poppins to life on the big screen in the early 1960s. This touching, funny film is really two stories nicely tied up in one appealing package. The first story is of P.L. Travers's childhood in Australia in the early 1900s. This story starts out idyllically enough, emphasizing her father's immense love for his children and his uncanny ability to make everything fun and exciting, but it's one that has a darker side that ends up shaping the adult that Travers eventually becomes. The other story is of the adult P.L. Travers. A proper Englishwoman completely set in her ways, she grudgingly embarks on a trip from England to Los Angeles to discuss the possibility of turning her highly successful book Mary Poppins into a Disney motion picture. Walt Disney has a vested personal interest in the project, but Travers and the Disney team clash on virtually every level and their interactions run the gamut from perplexing to infuriating and downright funny. The juxtaposition of the two stories is quite masterful, with the stories continually intertwining and each shedding light on the other to create a cohesive film that is highly engaging and emotionally poignant. The casting of Tom Hanks as Disney and Emma Thompson as Travers is inspired: they are absolutely perfect in their roles. Perhaps the most intriguing thing about this film is that Saving Mr. Banks creates a whole new perspective from which to view the beloved original Mary Poppins. (Ages 10 and older) --Tami Horiuchi for Amazon.com

Extra Mural Tour

A Tour of the Impressive Foundry of Metal Sculptor Larry Young

Date
May 16

Time
1:30 p.m.

Descriptions
The Osher Program will forego the Friday Film Festival on May 16 to tour the magnificent foundry of metal sculptor, Larry Young — whose impressive creations stand many stories high. We will meet at Larry’s Foundry and not at the Waters-Moss Area.

We will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the home of Sculptor Larry Young

Location
8700 S. North Millsite Road

The origin of mankind, and of man’srelationship with other life forms and hisdestination have been important elementsin many of Young’s works. He also hasbeen fascinated by human movement in dance and athletics and by the themes and compositional integrity of classical art. Like classical art, Young’s life forms and other images are vehicles through which compositional networks are materialized. He frequently creates complex simplicity by simplifying human forms and placing them within deceptively simple complexcompositions. View the artist’s web site for photos of his work and other details: http://youngsculpture.com.

The artist will welcome us into his home gallery. To familiarize us with the process of metal sculpturing, we will view a time-lapse video of the construction of a dramatic and most familiar piece of his art, the Nexus, which commands the corner of East Broadway and Old Highway 63 North — on the grounds of Boone Hospital Center’s medical park. The foundry is our next stop, just 100 yards from his house. It’s a wonderful opportunity for an up-close, full experience of an artist who creates art on a grand scale — one much larger than life. He developed his incredible skills and talent through a number of forums. He first learned to cast bronze as a molder in the U.S. Navy. Following his Navy service, he achieved international prominence as a two-time Olympic medalist, the only American ever to win a medal in long-distance race walking. During this period, he studied sculpture at Columbia College, followed by a two year fellowship to study sculpture in Italy. Young has been a full-time freelance artist ever since, known for his fluid forms, his innovative use of negative space and his mastery of the bronze medium.

Directions
Take U.S. 63 south to Route AB (approximately eight miles from I-70 — don’t confuse Route AB with AC), turn left and go east for five miles. The blacktop road ends at four miles. Continue on rock road to North Millsite Rd. Turn right and go south one mile to his rock house, the second house on the left.

Note
There are two sharp turns in the road just before you get to Young’s house. The driveway is at the mailbox that’s on a rock. the Youngs’ telephone number is 573-449-6810. You may also call Lucille Salerno's cell phone for assistance: 573-268-6690

Saturday Morning Book Talks 2014

Living History Museums: Travels Into Our Past: America’s Living History Museums and Historical Sites (2013)

  • Date
    March 1
  • Author
    Wayne Anderson
  • Sponsor
    Yolanda Ciolli, AKA Publishing

The Weight of Blood (2014)

  • Date
    April 5
  • Author
    Laura McHugh
  • Sponsor
    Libby Gill

The Tiger’s Eye (2011), Carnival for the Gods (2013)

  • Date
    May 3
  • Author
    Gladys Swan
  • Sponsor
    Marlene Lee

Too Quick for the Living (2014)

  • Date
    June 7
  • Author
    Walter Bargen
  • Sponsor
    Two Mules Editing

New Regionalism: The Art of Bryan Haynes (2013)

  • Date
    July 12
  • Author
    Bryan Haynes
  • Sponsor
    Missouri Life

A Road Trip Into America’s Hidden Heart (2012)

  • Date
    Aug. 2
  • Author
    J.D. Robinson
  • Sponsor
    AKA Publishing

Zen-Brain Horizons (2014)

  • Date
    Sept. 6
  • Author
    James Austin, MD
  • Sponsors
    Greg and Carol Busacker

Biting Through the Skin: An Indian Kitchen in America’s Heartland (2013)

  • Date
    Oct. 4
  • Author
    Nina Murkerjee Furstenau
  • Sponsor
    Laura McHugh

Walt Disney’s Missouri: The Roots of a Creative Genius

  • Date
    Nov. 1
  • Author
    Dan Viets
  • Sponsor
    The Kansas City Star

Limestone Wall

  • Date
    Dec. 6
  • Author
    Marlene Lee
  • Sponsor
    Boomerang Creek

Extra Mural Series: Speaking of Culture

Another wonderful gift to the Central Missouri community organized by the MU Honors College on the second Sunday of the month featuring talks by MU faculty and staff. Each talk is held at Orr Street Studios, 106 Orr Street, between Walnut and Ash, beginning at 2 p.m. and running approximately 50 minutes. Free and open to the public. Coffee and baked treats provided. For questions about the series, email Gabriel Fried, coordinator and MU professor.

Pride of Place: Recognizing MU Campus Landmarks

Date
March 9

Instructor
Arthur Merhoff, MU Museum of Art and Archeology

Hitting Home: A Talk on Poetry and Baseball

Date
April 13

Instructor
Gabriel Fried, MU Department of English

A Taste of Arts and Science

MU's College of Arts and Science presents a day of good food, fantastic professors, and topics as diverse as the world around us. Treat yourself to something wonderfully special and an experience of the very fine faculty that comprise the College of Arts and Science. Michael O’Brien is its justly proud dean

Time
8:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m

Date
Saturday, March 8 .

Location
Wrench Auditorium

Website
http://coas.missouri.edu/events/taste

Cost
$25

Contact
Amanda Schlink
573-884-4482
SchlinkA@missouri.edu

Introduction to Columbia Parks and Recreation 50+

Columbia Parks and Recreation’s 50+ and 50+ Tours programs are now located at the Hillcrest Community Center at 1907 Hillcrest Dr. in the Waters-Moss Memorial Wildlife Area. 573-874-7475 or 573-441-5525.

There are Painting Groups, drop-in games and activities, 50+ Explorers (jaunts around town) and Musical Groups practicing and then going out performing in local retirement, assisted-living, nursing homes and schools.

New Theater Restaurant
50+ Tours travels by charter coach on day and overnight tours. As season matinee ticket holders at the New Theatre Restaurant in Overland Park, KS, we enjoy the ride, buffet lunch and show with guest stars we know from film and TV.

Philadelphia, May 1 to 9
Our Spring Long Distance trip this year is to Philadelphia and surrounding Maryland, Delaware and New York City May 1-9, 2014.

  • Motorcoach transportation
  • Overnight accommodations (2 nights en route and 6 nights in Philadelphia)
  • Hotel breakfast daily
  • Local guides 2 days
  • Admissions to attractions
  • Day trips into Maryland and Delaware
  • Broadway show ticket
  • Amtrak ticket Philadelphia-New York-Penn Station
  • All taxes and gratuities
  • Trip cancellation insurance

Our monthly 50+ Hillcrest Community Center newsletter is available to pick up. The 50+ Tours newsletter is mailed to members or available on request. Information is also available online www.gocolumbiamo.com, Parks and Recreation, Search Senior/50

Updated 2/27/14