Note

Download a brochure and enrollment form (PDF)

All courses will meet at the Waters-Moss Memorial Wildlife Preservation Area, primarily in the Moss Building and occasionally in the Hillcrest Community Center unless otherwise indicated.

Contact Osher@Mizzou

Email Osher@Mizzou.edu or call 573-882-8189.

To register for classes, call 573-882-8189.

Mondays courses

Civil War Round Table [4 sessions]

Time
10–11:30 a.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
June 5, 12, 19, 26

Description
The Mid-Missouri Civil War Round Table returns for its seventh summer with Osher@Mizzou, offering a sample of the monthly programs presented by its members at Round Table meetings since 1981. Like other Round Tables across the nation, mid-Missouri's is made up of professional and amateur historians and anyone else interested in the Civil War.

Coordinator
Ralph Kreigh has been a member of the Mid-Missouri Civil War Round Table for nearly 30 years. He is the editor of its newsletter that he models after Harper's Weekly. His mother's family settled in Boone County in the 1820s.

Week 1
Engineering Victory

George Davis explains how Yankee engineers helped win the Civil War. The Union army marched over corduroy roads and pontoon bridges. The U.S. military railroad crossed trestle bridges and prefabricated portable trusses. The "Great Western Stump Cutter" cut a canal through swamps. All were built by engineers who led the way.

Instructor
George Davis is a geologist with the Missouri Department of Transportation who is pursuing a PhD at the University of Missouri Department of Geology. He has had a lifelong interest in the American Civil War, in particular the war in the west. His last Osher program was "The New Madrid and Island No. 10 Campaign of 1862."

Week 2
Resolved and Unresolved Issues of the American Civil War

Instructor
Barry Cardwell leads a discussion on issues resolved by the Civil War, such as slavery and secession, and issues that are still debated 150 years after the war's end, such as states' rights and whether these "united" states have really become the "United States." Join the discussion.

Instructor
Barry Cardwell is an MU Health care service coordinator. He previously led Round Table programs on the causes of the American War and "How the Civil War Made Baseball the American Pastime."

Week 3
From "Lost Cause" to Light Show: Stone Mountain as a Confederate Symbol

In recent decades, Civil War monuments have been a contentious matter, particularly in the former Confederate states. To some, Civil War memorials represent a recognition of — and homage to — a lost, but noble, cause. Others view Confederate memorials as symbols that celebrate a system of overt racism and oppression. The equestrian statuary of Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson on Stone Mountain, near Atlanta, is the world's largest bas-relief sculpture. Even as the project was initiated early in the 20th century, the second Ku Klux Klan used Stone Mountain as the site of its inaugural meeting. To this day Stone Mountain represents the most visible site in arguments about the meaning of Confederate memorials.

Instructor
Von Pittman completed his doctorate in diplomatic history at the University of Georgia. He has worked in the field of continuing education at four state universities, including Mizzou, where he taught in the College of Education and directed the Center for Distance and Independent Study and later the Law Enforcement Training Institute. His most recent Civil War Round Table program at Osher was "Secret Yankees: The Union Circle in Confederate Atlanta."

Week 4
The Voyage of the C.S.S. Shenandoah

Gene McArtor will take participants on a round-the-world cruise of the Confederate Navy's last sea raider, the C.S.S. Shenandoah. Its mission was to destroy the Union whaling fleet. In doing so, the Shenandoah fired the last shots of the Civil War.

Instructor
Gene McArtor holds bachelor's, master's and PhD degrees from the University of Missouri. He and his wife, Donna, have been married for 52 years. They have two sons, Steven and Michael, and five grandchildren.

Painting Missouri: George Caleb Bingham and Thomas Hart Benton [4 sessions]

Time
Noon–1:30 p.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
June 5, 12, 19, 26

Description
Nationally recognized painters George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879) and Thomas Hart Benton (1889-1975) not only made Missouri their home but also the subject of much of their art. This class explores the work of these artists in a social and historical context. Students will be introduced to numerous artworks created by these Missouri masters, including paintings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the White House, and The State Historical Society of Missouri in Columbia, Mo. They will also learn how these complex works not only serve as beautiful examples of our cultural heritage but also help us better understand our history.

Instructor
Joan Stack has served as the curator of art collections at the State Historical Society of Missouri since 2006. She received her PhD in art history from Washington University in St. Louis. She has organized more than 60 art exhibitions, published three books on Missouri art and presented her scholarly work nationally and internationally. Recently featured as an authority on art in Missouri in the 2017 BBC series "Great American Railroad Journeys," she also served as an advisor and on-screen expert for the 2016 documentary, "The American Artist: The Life and Times of George Caleb Bingham," produced by Wide Awake Films.

Fashion in Shakespeare's Time [4 sessions]

Time
1–2:30 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
June 5, 12, 19, 26

Description
Shakespeare sets his plays in many countries, describes historic events and explores the motivations of his characters. Onstage, his plays were costumed in Elizabethan "modern dress." But what would a young girl (a Juliet) of the 15th century have worn? The class looks at fashionable and practical clothing from Rome to 16th century England.

Instructor
Patti Doyle is a Shakespeare fan. The Stratford Festival in Ontario, Canada, has been her go-to venue for plays since she was in college at the University of Detroit. Doyle was the professor of costume design at the Stephens College Theatre Program in Columbia, Mo., for more than 30 years. In retirement, she brings the history and art of costume to Osher.