Note

Download a brochure and enrollment form (PDF)

All courses will meet at the Waters-Moss Memorial Wildlife Preservation Area, primarily in the Moss Building and occasionally in the Hillcrest Community Center unless otherwise indicated.

Contact Osher@Mizzou

Email Osher@Mizzou.edu or call 573-882-8189.

To register for classes, call 573-882-8189.

Friday courses

Potpourri of the Arts [8 sessions]

Time
9:30–11 a.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 15, 22, 29, Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, Nov. 3

Coordinator
Carolyn Dye

  • Sept. 15
    Stephens College School of Performing Arts: Celebrating 70 Years of Theater

    Staff and guests from the Stephens College School of Performing Arts will share an overview of the 2017–18 season, with a special focus on the Playhouse Theatre Company, celebrating its 70th season.
    Instructor
    Ruth Ann Burke, a proud Stephens alumna, is the business manager for the School of Performing Arts, as well as the executive director of the Okoboji Summer Theatre in Spirit Lake, Iowa, which celebrates its 60th year in 2017. Other faculty and/or guest artists will join Burke to share details about the Playhouse, Warehouse Theatre and dance and music productions at Stephens this year.
  • Sept. 22
    "Practicing Democracy," An Original Two-Act Play

    David Webber will discuss his original two-act play, "Practicing Democracy," that is being performed at 7:30 p.m., Sept. 21-24 and at 2 p.m. Sept. 25 at the United Methodist Church in Columbia, Mo. Directed by Bryon Scott and sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Columbia-Boone County, the play follows two ambitious young candidates aspiring to the state legislature who meet an elder statesman intent on restoring democracy. The mix of campaign practices and information technology provide challenges and opportunities affecting the election result. The inspiration for the play came in 1999 when Webber observed university students working on opposite sides of a campaign — each with a personal stake in the outcome and confident in their campaign skills.
    Instructor
    David Webber joined the MU Political Science Department in 1986, specializing in American public policy and politics. He wrote his dissertation on state legislatures at Indiana University in 1983. In addition to academic publications, he has written regular opinion columns for the Columbia Tribune and Missouiran. His first play, "A Night at the Shelter," was performed in Columbia in November 2015. During his 35-year political science career, he has enjoyed and been challenged by conversations with hundreds of legislators, thousands of students and citizens and about a dozen Mr. Adams. He has come to appreciate the challenges of running a democracy.
  • Sept. 29
    Enchanting Harp

    Have you ever heard the harp at a symphony performance and wanted to hear more of this beautiful instrument? Then come and hear concert harpist Maria Duhova Trevor play a half hour concert followed by a lecture on the history of the harp and Q-and-A session. Duhova Trevor plays everything from classical though Celtic, movie scores, musicals, therapeutic and sacred music. Don't miss an opportunity to hear this angelic instrument played up close and learn about the workings of its 47 strings and seven pedals.
    Instructor
    Maria Duhova Trevor is the principal harpist of the Missouri and Springfield Symphony orchestras and adjunct instructor of harp at the University of Missouri and Truman State University. Prior to coming to the United States from Slovakia, she was principal harpist of the Bohuslav Martinu Philharmonic in the Czech Republic and a featured recitalist at the Seventh World Harp Congress in 1999, the same year she was appointed to the harp position at the Slovak National Opera. A featured soloist and regular chamber music performer, she has collaborated with many artists, including Art Garfunkel, Johnny Mathis, Eileen Ivers, Jennifer Holliday and the Texas Tenors. She has provided wedding music for more than 150 couples and performed for many special events and service groups. In 2011, she initiated monthly Harp and Healing services at the Broadway Christian Church, music that is included in an album, "Healing Harp." She has been working on a second recording and new projects with group harp ensembles, as well as taking the harp into unexpected locations. Duhova Trevor lives in Columbia, Mo., with her husband, conductor Kirk Trevor, and their three children. To learn more, please visit www.mariaharp.com.
  • Oct. 6
    Fiction as a Change Agent

    From campfire stories to the latest novels, fiction has served as a change agent. One of the most influential books in American history was Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Few other writers have succeeded so well in telling tales that initiate major movements. Today, many writers build an awareness of social problems by integrating them into their story lines. Author Carolyn Mulford names some of the most influential novels of the 19th and 20th centuries, gives examples of novels advocating change or raising awareness and describes how she incorporates such problems as elder abuse and domestic violence into her Show Me mystery series.
    Instructor
    Carolyn Mulford worked on four continents as a nonfiction writer and editor before turning to fiction. Her award-winning Show Me series features a former CIA covert operative who returns to rural Missouri and adapts her tradecraft to solve crimes with old friends and a K-9 dropout. In "Show Me the Sinister Snowman," the fifth book, a blizzard traps her in an isolated antebellum mansion with an abusive husband outside and an unknown killer inside. Mulford also has written two Middle Grade/Young Adult (MG/YA) novels, "The Feedsack Dress" and "Thunder Beneath My Feet." To read the first chapters, go to http://CarolynMulford.com.
  • Oct. 13
    Songs, Humor and Science

    This session focuses on finding humor in and forming songs around scientific topics. Since music and humor are doorways into learning and memory, they can help foster a life-long interest in science in the increasingly technical world we live in. Jeff Moran (Dr. Chordate) will perform a few of his original songs and humor, but he also encourages people to come with ideas about scientific topics that might be good for a composition or two. If time permits, participants might even generate a new song for future performance.
    Instructor
    Jeff Moran (Dr. Chordate) started as a theater major but ended up with a PhD in zoology from the University of Arkansas. He taught biology, biochemistry, anatomy and physiology at several colleges and universities, as well as doing research on snake and spider venoms, red blood cell metabolism and liver function. He has also written about 175 songs, including "Fifty Ways to Love Your Liver" and "The Turkey Vulture Song." He has presented about the use of humor and music in science education from the Smithsonian Institution to Cooper's Landing. He lives with his wife, a wildlife biologist, on 20 acres in central Missouri that they have mostly converted to native prairie.
  • Oct. 20  
    Watercolor and Colored Pencil Painting

    Artist I. Lynn Garriott Porter will give a brief talk on her journey in watercolor and colored pencil painting, as well as provide a demonstration on the watercolor pencil medium with time for questions and answers after. Porter has had two paintings published in Colored Pencil books and will have these paintings and some of her other art on display. If time allows, she will encourage participants to try using the watercolor pencils and paper she will have on hand.
    Instructor
    I. Lynn Garriott Porter was born in Fulton, Mo., and grew up living in the country and loving the beauty of her surroundings. Art was her first love, and watercolor was her first medium of choice. Later, she discovered colored pencil and gained a new love. She has found that watercolor pencil gives her the pleasure of both mediums in one. Her work has been exhibited in many shows, galleries, hospitals, businesses and competitions throughout Missouri. She is the assistant director and board member at Art House in Fulton; a member of the Colored Pencil Society of America, National Watercolor Society and Missouri Water Color Society; and a Juried Best of Missouri Hands Artist. She was the profiled artist in Ann Kullberg's February 2008 colored pencil e-zine, "From My Perspective"; has one of her watercolor pencil paintings in Kullberg's most recent book, "Colored Pencil Secrets to Success"; and a colored pencil pet portait in "Colored Pencil Cats & Dogs." Porter worked full-time in the medical field, doing artwork primarily on commission. She still does commissioned work and teaches art classes. Art House in Fulton, Capitol Arts Gallery in Jefferson City and the Columbia Art League show her most recent work.
  • Oct. 27
    The Piano and Me: An Aspiring Lounge Lizard

    This presentation is designed to help the student appreciate the complexity and beauty of music. Fundamentals of harmonics, chording, voicing and piano styles will be discussed and presented, focusing on selected harmonies and personal keyboard improvisation. In improv, no two players are alike.
    Instructor
    Michael Porter writes, "I am not a professional piano player, although the Water Mitty [in me] wishes that I were. I have played pianos in some great spots: hotel lobbies, garages in Wisconsin, MU Alumni Center, presidents' homes, conventions, conferences; I've led sing-alongs at retirement centers, and played for the MURA [Missouri University Retirees Association] gatherings."
  • Nov. 3
    Artist in Residence from Access Arts

    School of Service began in 1971 and has since evolved into the thriving Access Arts program. Its mission is to provide creative learning experiences for everyone. The program offers instruction in various art media, with an emphasis on serving underserved audiences. From the beginner to the advanced artist, all are welcome in our studios. Learn more at http://schoolofservice.org.
    Instructor
    Shawna Johnson is the director of Access Arts.

Brown Bag Seminars [7 sessions]

Time
11:15 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 15, 22, 29, Oct. 6, 13, 20, Nov. 3 [7 sessions]

Description
Weekly seminar topics are listed below. Additional sessions may be scheduled and announced via email updates. Brown Bag Seminars are open to all Osher premium, semester and basic members throughout the academic year. Feel free to bring your lunch.

Coordinator
Carolyn Dye

  • Sept. 15
    "The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing"

    Lib Couper will lead an interactive discussion of Marie Kondo's book, "The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing." Pre-reading this book is essential to the success of this session.
    Instructor
    Elizabeth "Lib" Couper is a 35-year resident of Columbia, a Mizzou graduate school alumna; a former teacher in the gifted and talented program for the Columbia Public Schools; and a wife and mother. All of her roles have caused her to collect a lot of possessions that she needs to jettison. Join Couper for this class that participants and instructor alike may need.
  • Sept. 22
    The Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge: A Work in Progress

    The Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge provides a unique perspective of wildlife habitat management along the lower Missouri River. Drastically changed from its historic meandering channels, the river hosts a fraction of the diverse wildlife habitat before channelization. Learn how this refuge — managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service working with partners and willing sellers — strives to return the habitat to a highly altered floodplain rich in natural and cultural history.
    Instructor
    Tim Haller is the visitor services manager for the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Born and raised in Jefferson City, Mo., Haller has worked on rivers across the country from Alaska to Oregon. He is proud to return to his home state to work on one of our nation's greatest river systems.
  • Sept. 29
    Growing Up in a Land Called Honalee: The Sixties in the Lives of American Children

    Because the preadolescent years are the most formative, according to child development researchers, professor Joel P. Rhodes focuses on the cohort born between 1956 and 1970. Though never quantitatively defined as a generation, this cohort's preadolescent world was quite distinct from that of the "baby boomers." Rhodes examines how this group understood the historical forces of the 1960s as children, and how they made meaning of these forces based on their developmental age. He is concerned not only with the immediate imprint of the 1960s on their young lives, but with how their perspective on the era has influenced them as adults.
    Instructor
    Joel P. Rhodes is a professor in the History Department of Southeast Missouri State University. He is the author of several books, including a new paperback edition of "A Missouri Railroad Pioneer: The Life of Louis Houck" and "The Voice of Violence: Performative Violence as Protest in the Vietnam Era." He lives in Cape Girardeau, Mo.
  • Oct. 6
    What's Super About Superfoods

    There is a new day dawning on the world of nutrition. More and more people are opening up to organic food and natural health. A critical mass of consumers are shifting purchasing power toward organic products. They are looking for the healthiest foods possible. Among these nutrient-dense foods are superfoods that have multiple unique properties. This class will explore superfoods in general and several in particular. There will be some delicious snacks provided.
    Instructor
    Jane W. Smith has been a student of nutrition and healthy living all of her adult life. After raising children and more than 20 years as a hospital chaplain, she now owns Abundant Raw Life where she provides health coaching programs and raw food preparation classes to people seeking healing from illnesses and overall improved wellness and vitality. Smith emphasizes that the same diet may not be for everyone, works with many situations and health challenges and believes that everyone can benefit from introducing more raw fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds into their eating plans.
  • Oct. 13
    Change on the U.S. Supreme Court: the 2016-2017 Term and the Arrival of a New Justice

    The class will look at the most important decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court's most recent term, assess the impact of its operating short-handed with only eight justices, evaluate the contributions of President Trump's appointee Justice Neil Gorsuch in the last two-plus months of the term and consider the nature of the Supreme Court appointment process.
    Instructor
    William B. Fisch, professor emeritus of law at the University of Missouri, has been a member of the law faculty since 1970. Before coming to MU, he practiced law in Chicago with Kirkland & Ellis and served on the law faculty of the University of North Dakota. He retired emeritus in January 2003 and continued to teach as adjunct faculty until 2012. Fisch has published widely in the fields of American and comparative civil procedure, professional responsibility and constitutional law.
  • Oct. 20
    Central Missouri Humane Society Programs and Services

    This 30-minute Power Point presentation highlights the programs and services that the Central Missouri Humane Society offers and the impact the program makes in the community.
    Instructor
    Sue Worsowicz is the community relations coordinator for the Central Missouri Humane Society. She gives presentations to groups and service organizations highlighting the programs and services the agency offers and its impact in the community. She also teaches the iPads and iPhones class at Osher. Worsowicz has a degree in civil engineering and enjoys all kinds of technology and activities that involve teaching and helping others.
  • Nov. 3
    Outlook and Opportunities: Separate the Signal from the Noise

    This course explores the economy and its outlook, current market trends, strategies to prepare for volatility and improving your balance.
    Instructor
    J R Lawless began his career as an Edward Jones financial advisor in Versailles, Mo., moving to the firm's Columbia, Mo., offices in 2005. As regional leader since 2012, he is responsible for more than 40 branch teams throughout west central Missouri. He was named a principal with the firm in 2016. He and his staff were recognized for client service excellence and attended the 2010 Drucker Conference. A native of Marshall, Mo., Lawless graduated from the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo., and earned an MBA in finance and entrepreneurship from the Olin School of Business at Washington University in St. Louis. He also holds Certified Financial PlannerTM and Accredited Asset Management SpecialistSM designations. Before joining Edward Jones, Lawless was a captain in the U.S. Air Force and deputy program manager for the Korean F-16 Fighter Program. Lawless is a member of Columbia Rotary South and Mid-Missouri Chapter of the Retired Military Officers Association. He also served on the MOST-Missouri's 529 College Savings Plan Board.

Friday Afternoon Film Festival

Each Friday during the semester

Time
Films begin at 1:30 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Description
Quality films are followed by genuinely interesting discussions.

Films are announced weekly via email and on the Facebook page for Osher@Mizzou. All classes will be at the same location. If you wish to be kept informed about the weekly films, include your email address when you register for a course. If your email address changes, be sure to update us. The Friday Afternoon Film Festival is now open only to Osher members and guests of premium Osher members.