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Details

All Osher at Mizzou courses will meet at the Moss Building about 1/3 mile from the Stadium/Old Highway 63 intersection. Turn on Hillcrest Drive. The Moss Building (Osher at Mizzou) and the Hillcrest Community Center will be on the left. The Moss Building entrance is located on the east side. Parking is conveniently located.

As a registered student in our program, you may request a library card for use in the MU Libraries. Should you wish a library card, please apply through our office.

If the Columbia School System cancels classes, the Osher classes, too, will not meet on that day.

Contact Osher at Mizzou

Email learnforlife@missouri.edu
Call 573-882-2585 or 573-882-8189

Directions and parking

Courses are held in the Moss Building at 1907 Hillcrest Drive in Columbia, Mo., at the Waters-Moss Memorial Wildlife Area unless otherwise noted.

Osher updates

Each week we email all members, and often these emails include information not printed in the course catalog. Details about upcoming Brown Bag Seminar and reviews of the movies to be shown at the Friday Film Festival are routinely shared in these emails. In addition, new and exciting events might come up later and will be scheduled as a talk, a formal presentation or seminar. We rely on email to get you this timely information.

You can stay well-informed if you have taken the time to send your email address to Till Rosenberger atrosenbergert@missouri.edu. Do it today! Be sure to check your email for information about spontaneous events that certainly may prove exciting.

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All courses will meet at the Waters-Moss Memorial Wildlife Preservation Area, primarily in the Moss Building and occasionally in the Hillcrest Community Center unless otherwise indicated.

Mondays

Regional Issues Potpourri [8 sessions ]

Time
9-10:30 a.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 8, 15, 22, 29 and Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27

Note
Specific dates for each topic TBA

Description

  • What Seniors Should Know About Fitness: How to Evaluate and Maintain Your Minds and Body as You Age
    • Instructor
      Mary Beth Brown is a physical therapy faculty member at the School of Health Professions and is a nationally known researcher in aging and fitness.
  • What is the Community Foundation of Central Missouri? Where Did It Come From? Where Is It Going?
    • Instructor
      John Baker is executive director for Community Foundation of Central Missouri.
  • Challenges of an Independent Newspaper in the Age of Blogs and Sound Bites
    • Instructors
      Vicki Russell is a publisher at the Columbia Daily Tribune and Board President of Regional Economic Development, Inc. (REDI); and Mystery Guest.
  • Housing for Everyone: Strategic Planning to Preserve and Create Affordable Housing Options
    • Instructor:
      Phil Steinhaus is CEO for the Columbia Housing Authority
  • Hiding in Plain Sight: Great Things to See, Do and Eat Just Off the Beaten Track!
    • Instructor
      Bill Clark has been retired from baseball scouting for over a decade but his work and achievements have not been forgotten. He has received the“Legends in Scouting” award from the Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation. Bill Clark has ventured into a wide array of fields: journalism, baseball scouting, birdwatching and yes, weightlifting. Clark writes five columns a week for the Columbia Daily Tribune — by hand. He is known in the community as “Ol’ Clark.”
  • Major Changes in Priorities and Funding - What Next?
    • Instructor
      Tim Rich is executive director for Heart of Missouri United Way.
  • Public Art in Columbia: What Is It, Where Is It and Where Did It Come From?
    • Instructor
      JJ Musgrove is director for the Office of Cultural Affairs for City of Columbia.
  • Where Is Our $6.5 Million a Year In New Sales Tax Revenues Going to Go?
    • Instructor
      Kelly Wallis is director for Boone County Community Services.

Travels with Sharon (Kinden) [8 sessions ]

Time
10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
Sept. 8, 15, 22, 29 and Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27

Description
If you’ve never “traveled with Sharon” before, you’ll enjoy the reprise of this course. Whether you want to travel vicariously, investigate interesting future destinations or relive fond memories of your own, come join “Travels With Sharon.” Amazing photos will tell the tales of exotic travels:

East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania and Rwanda): Without the dust and bumpy roads, go on a safari to witness the wild animals hunting, mating, giving birth, resting and going about their daily lives. Africa Part II: Meet the people of Africa, visit schools, shop in village markets, enter a Maasai home made of cow dung and meet the village elders as we strive to understand life in a developing country still grappling with a tribal mentality. Antarctica: Join the expedition vessel Sarpik Ittuk as it maneuvers around icebergs covered with seals, dodges whales and sails into glacial coves never entered in recorded history. Clamber ashore from a bobbing Zodiac, take a Polar Plunge and cross the Drake Passage in a Beaufort 11 storm with 30-foot waves and wind speeds of 65 knots (known in the Midwest as a hurricane). Tibet: Fly over breathtaking Mt. Everest, climb the 1,000 steps of the Potala Palace, tour the open countryside and witness the struggle between modern Chinese Huns and Tibetan Buddhists clinging to their ancient culture. Machu Picchu/Galapagos Islands: Immerse yourself in the spiritual experience of Cuzco and the Incan ruins of Machu Picchu. Then hike the natural wonders of the Islands of the Galapagos. China: In Beijing, Xian, Shanghai and Suzhou see ancient traditions meet the modern world. If time permits, venture into northeastern China to witness the Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival of Harbin.

Instructor
Sharon Kinden was raised on a farm in northeastern South Dakota and attended a one-room schoolhouse. As the only student in her grade, she had ample time to read about intriguing places. She never dreamed she’d actually get to touch exotic places like the Pyramids of Giza, the Taj Mahal or Angkor Wat. Coming face-to-face with mortality in 1997 when her beloved husband died of ALS-Lou Gehrig’s disease, she changed her priorities and started traveling. Kinden has since visited 67 countries and all seven continents. Known as a master writer of travelogues and a master photographer, she is bringing her talents to OLLI.

The Ways Huckleberry Finn Matters in Our Time [5 sessions]

Time
11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 15, 22, 29 and Oct. 6, 13

Description
Explore how The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn matters, both in the classroom and, potentially, in American and even global culture. Mark Twain’s novel is a distillation of his experience in the antebellum Mississippi River Valley and, as such, serves as an important historical document of our culture. It is also an achievement of language. Twain preserved and made vivid the dialects of that day in ways that are both comic and serious. “Huckleberry Finn” has sometimes been called the “great American novel,” a curious statement given that the book has been banned virtually from its first publishing and has many anomalies and flaws. It has, at any rate, deeply influenced modern writers and perhaps changed the course of American fiction. Despite its quintessential Americanness, the book and its characters have long had an international appeal. It is a biting satire, but also the deeply moving dramatization of a moral dilemma of a barely literate young boy that still speaks to us. In complex ways, the novel challenges notions of race and racism. “Huckleberry Finn” still matters and is likely to be important for many generations to come.

Instructor
Tom Quirk is professor of English at the University of Missouri. He is the author or editor of a number of books and essays about American literature, including several works about Mark Twain. In 2009, he received the The John S. Tuckey Lifetime Achievement Award for Contributions to Mark Twain Scholarship and to the Elmira College Center for Mark Twain Studies.

Maurice Ravel: The Music, the Man, the Cultural Milieu of His Paris [8 sessions]

Time
1:15-2:45 p.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
Sept. 8, 15, 22, 29 and Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27

Description
Ravel’s music — particularly the Boléro — is universally known. But do we really know this wondrous music, given how wildly each piece differs from the others? All great art contains a mystery, particularly Ravel’s. In the New York Times of Feb. 26, 1928, as part of the composer’s American tour, Olin Downes wrote this:

The man and his music are one, and they combine for the purposes of self-preservation. It is amazing to examine his scores - his defenses. They are structures of consummate logic and refinement. …Within the subtle circle with which he surrounds himself, in a self-appointed and self-created kingdom, this man has found an invisible refuge from reality. Is this art the fruition, or the last vestige, or the mere mirage of a defeated and vanishing culture?

This eight-week course of listening, lecture, and discussion will traverse Ravel’s oeuvre and its cultural context. We hope along the way to catch glimpses of Ravel’s musical genius and its underlying mystery. No musical formation is needed, just an open mind, ear and heart.

Instructor
L. Hunter Kevil, PhD, is the retired director of acquisitions of MU Ellis Library.

By Design: Promising Trends and Innovations [8 sessions ]

Time
1:30-3 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 8, 15, 22, 29, Oct. 13, 20, 27 and Nov. 3 (No class on Oct. 6)

Description
The instructors will use their diverse travel experiences to, show how designers are creating a more attractive, efficient and functional world. Each session will survey the history of a field and investigate its innovators and their predictions about the future. Sessions will cover the following topics:

  • Changes in how we are housed and how living conditions are computer based
  • How Habitat for Humanity is housing the world’s poor and how designs for the other 90 percent are creating new tools for economically developing countries
  • How what we wear affects how we live and vice versa
  • How medical innovation is creating new body parts and designer babies
  • With drones and robots becoming more advanced, will we become cyborgs?
  • How we stand in awe of the spectacular new art museums and performing arts theaters
  • How artists from Rockwell to Chihuly surround us with beauty
  • How advances in technology affect how we think and how we relate to others

Instructors
Wayne Anderson, professor emeritus of psychology, writes a travel column for the Columbia Daily Tribune with more than occasional assistance from his wife, Carla Anderson, PhD, who is a retired psychologist.

The Triumph of 19th-Century Fiction: Realism or Romance? Three Representative Novels [7 sessions]

Time
1-2:30 p.m.

Location
Hillcrest C

Dates
Sept. 8, 15, 22, 29 and Oct. 6, 13, 20

Description
The great novels of the 19th century on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, written during the rise of the middle class and the quick spread of literacy, were immensely popular during their time, but have retained the esteem of readers up to the present day as the continued popularity of such authors as Jane Austen, the Brontës, Dickens, Thackeray or Twain so powerfully attest. Unlike much of the literature of earlier centuries that was made for a small literate aristocracy, the 19th-century novel was aimed at a large middle class and claimed to deal with real everyday life, the actual rather than the fanciful, the world of reality rather than romance. Yet interestingly — and perhaps what gives these novels their enduring quality — a romantic, sometimes mythical power colors their attempt at realism. This course will consider this juxtaposition through the example of three classic Victorian novels: Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, Dickens's Oliver Twist and Thackeray's Vanity Fair. All three novels are still widely read and have been the subject of movies and television adaptations.

Instructor
Howard Fulweiler taught English literature and general humanities courses for 40 years at the University of Missouri before retiring. He has written widely on 19th-century fiction and poetry as well as scientific, religious and cultural history.

Tuesdays

The Psychology of the Good Life: Happiness, Meaning in Life, and Personal Growth [8 sessions ]

Time
9:30-10:30 a.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30 and Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28

Description
Most people think of psychology as the science of what’s wrong with people. But a great deal of the science of psychology (and a great deal of the psychology studied at Mizzou) focuses not on psychological disorders but on the science of psychological well-being. In this course, we’ll review what that science has to tell us about happiness, meaning in life, and personal growth. We will review topics ranging from how happiness is defined and measured to whether we can make ourselves happier (and whether we should!). We’ll learn simple strategies for enhancing psychological well-being, what works and what doesn’t. We’ll explore the fascinating topic of meaning in life, what it is, where it comes from and why we search for it. Finally, we will consider the ways that people can grow through negative life experiences, and the ways happiness and growth relate to and are affected by potentially negative life events.

Handouts

Instructor
Laura A. King, PhD, is a new instructor for Osher. She is a curators’ professor of psychological sciences at the University of Missouri. Her research has focused on well-being, especially meaning in life, motivation, narrative approaches, folk theories of The Good Life and individual differences in intuitive information processing. Whatever the topic, her work reflects an enduring interest in what is healthy and functioning about people, and recognizing psychological functioning in everyday people and their everyday lives. She has published over 100 articles and chapters and three textbooks. King has edited numerous journals in personality and social psychology and is currently the editor of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Personality Processes and Individual Differences.

Researching Your Family History [8 sessions]

Time
10-11:30 a.m.

Location
This is an out-state offering, held at MOREnet Headquarters in Columbia. MORE net is located just off Interstate 70 in the Shoppes at Stadium. Use the North entrance on the second floor right above Jazz and Ulta Beauty. Elevator provided. 221 N. Stadium Blvd, Suite 201 Columbia, MO 65203 http://www.more.net/content/find-morenet to a computer of benefit since many sources of information are readily available online.

Dates
Sept. 9, 16. 23, 30 and Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28

Description
One of the world’s most popular hobbies is genealogy. You may have dabbled a bit or have already been bitten by the genealogy bug. Derived from Greek, the word genealogy means the study of family history and descent. The written history of a family is called a family tree or a pedigree. But what starts as simple curiosity can quickly grow into an obsession.

People decide to research their family’s history for different reasons, perhaps to understand a little more about themselves and their roots; to give their children a sense of family by providing them with information about their ancestors, where they came from and how they lived; to compile a family medical history; to qualify for a lineage society, such as the Daughters of the American Revolution or Sons of the American Revolution or other heritage societies; or to publish a family history book.

Whatever your motivation, this class will examine the hows and wheres to research your family history. It is helpful if participants have begun the process and know how to complete pedigree charts and family group sheets, either on paper or a computer. Though not required, participants will find access

Instructor
Anna L. Martin, EdD, retired educator, has been researching her family tree for more than 30 years. After teaching high school history, it was a natural progression to researching her family history. She previously taught a genealogy course at NCMC in Trenton, Mo., and two genealogy courses for Osher. She continues to write a monthly genealogy column for her hometown newspaper, the Republican Times in Trenton, and has written articles for the Missouri State Genealogy Society journal and the local Genealogy Society of Central Missouri newsletter. She is a member of the Genealogy Society of Central Missouri in Columbia and the Grundy County Genealogical Society. She volunteers regularly at the Walters-Boone County Historical Society’s Wilson-Wulff Library.

Mah Jongg [8 sessions]

Time
10:30 a.m.-noon

Location
Hillcrest A

Dates
Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30 and Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28

Description
Mah Jongg is a Chinese gambling game played with three to four players. Luck does play a part in the game, but skill and intelligence are required. One origin story states that a game similar to Mah Jongg was created around the time of Confucius in 500 B.C., perhaps by Confucius himself. The game was exclusive to the royal class, and commoners were outlawed from playing the game under threat of decapitation. The penalty eventually was lifted and the game spread throughout China. Joseph P. Babcock, a resident of Shanghai, China, introduced the game to America in 1920. Babcock coined the term “Mah Jongg” for the game and provided a list of rules and English translations to the tiles. Mah Jongg reached great heights by 1923 where sets were being shipped to the U.S. by the thousands, but its popularity tapered by the late 1920s. The Great Depression brought the revival of table, card and board games, including Mah Jongg, at a time when unemployed people were seeking mental challenges. Enthusiasts continue to play the game. You’re invited to join the challenge of keeping this ancient cognitive challenge alive and thriving. This course will use the rules of the National Mah Jongg League. If you have one, please bring your Mah Jongg set. If you don’t own a set, you can likely borrow one. The newest cards to guide your play will be supplied.

Instructor
Dee Dee Strnad is a retired teacher of Columbia Public Schools with a MA in special education. She taught special needs students at West Junior High for 19 years and has been playing Mah Jongg for about 16 years. Strnad remembers hearing her mother and her friends “calling out” the tile names when she was a child. Because she plays with her mother’s mah jongg set, Strnad feels a connection to the past and closeness with her late mother. She plays weekly with a group of friends and has taught the game to retired teachers as well as to Osher members. A modest lab fee of $15 is added to the course registration fee to cover materials.

Matters of Life and Death: Personal Choices and Social Policies [8 sessions]

Time
11a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30 and Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28

Description
In this course, we will discuss a number of social issues and practices involving death and dying that affect all of us. We will examine various schools of thought in contemporary ethics for these issues and will discuss how we each might address them if confronted with them personally. What are the practices of our society with its laws, customs and religious commitments? Should we support and conform to them or seek to have them changed? Discussions will vary depending on concerns of the participants, but topics could include abortion, capital punishment, assisted suicide, war over social conflicts, foreign aid, environmental preservation or animal rights.

You will get background for each issue to review the ethical and social questions involved. For example, what does each viewpoint assume about human nature, the nature of the good life, when is life not worth living, and what are our obligations to others and ourselves.

Instructor
John Kultgen is an MU professor emeritus of philosophy and has authored books on the ethics of paternalism, professional ethics, theories of human nature and the morality of nuclear deterrence.

General Psychology [8 sessions]

Time
1-2:30 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30 and Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28

Description
Psychology is the study of mental processes and behaviors. Explore the many facets of what makes us think, act and feel the way we do. We will perform activities including the following topics:

  • Memory (your memory might not be as good as you think!)
  • Thinking and intelligence (We’ll learn the many different types of intelligence and decipher the scores on traditional intelligence tests.)
  • Personality (the five major characteristics and how they can change)
  • Motivation (internal and external) • Emotions (how to best describe what you’re REALLY feeling)
  • Stress (things in our daily lives cause us stress without our realizing it)

By learning about these aspects of our lives, we’ll be better able to understand and explain our own behavior, and know why we do what we do.

Instructor
Becky Allen has been teaching for 11 years. She taught elementary school for six years and has taught college psychology classes for five years.

Beginning Spanish [8 sessions]

Time
1:30-3 p.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30 and Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28

Description
Welcome (Bienvenidos) to Beginning Spanish! ¡Olé! No previous knowledge of Spanish is required, but you are welcome to enroll in this course regardless of your proficiency level, as long as you realize the class will start with the absolute basics for beginners.

Some sessions will include native Spanish speakers. The course will focus on basic grammar and conversational Spanish to provide you with basic communication skills. It requires practice of the language outside the classroom to master the material, but the instructor realizes students likely have other obligations. This course will have a relaxed atmosphere with the understanding that making mistakes can help you learn. If you must miss a class, the instructor will be happy to meet with you to keep you on track for the next session. Because people learn so much by listening, you should attend class even if you have not had the time to finish homework.

Recommended text
Jarvis, A., et al. Basic Spanish: The Basic Spanish Series, 2nd edition. (2011). Boston: Heinle (Bundle ISBN: 1111289298). The instructor can lend these books to participants. For practice exercises and activities to accompany the text, you can purchase a three-semester program online for $45.25 from Cengage Brain at http://www.cengagebrain.com/shop.

Instructor
Señora Judy Elliott, tour director y nuestra profesora, is retired from MU. She was an instructor of Spanish for health care personnel and Mexico grant coordinator for the MU Sinclair School of Nursing, as well as an interpreter for University Hospitals and Clinics. As a former coordinator for Mexico programs at MU’s International Center, Elliott accompanied more than 600 students to Mexico for language study and organized Mexico exchanges for nursing schools at two Canadian universities, the University of Iowa and MU. She has previously directed four Spanish immersion programs in Cuernavaca for the Osher program.

Four Nobel Prize Poets: Heaney (1995), Szymborska (1996), Brodsky (1987) and Mistral (1945) [8 sessions]

Note
Enrollment is limited to 12 students

Time
1:30-3 p.m.

Location
Hillcrest C

Dates
Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30 and Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28

Description
Ireland, Poland, Russia, Chile; four cultures, four languages, four different poetic traditions. In this course we will read and discuss representative poems by each of these great poets, exploring the ways they immersed themselves in the history, politics, societies and cultural traditions from which they emerged. The poems of these writers, not their Nobel prizes or other laurels, are what help us experience the power of poetry. If time allows, we will look at works by Pasternak, Milosz, Transtromer and others.

Representative poems for discussion will be supplied; more poems are available at various websites. If participants would like to own their own copies of these poets’ books, a number of titles are available from Amazon, Abebooks and other sources. The instructor will give recommendations for additional readings on request. Participants should come prepared to read aloud and comment on favorite poems, either from the materials supplied or found in their own reading.

Instructor
Thomas F. Dillingham, PhD, is a former English and creative writing professor at Stephens College and professor emeritus of English at Central Methodist University.

Wednesdays

Master Plots and Character Archetypes: The Elements of Story [8 sessions]

Time
8:45-10:15 a.m.

Location
Hillcrest C

Dates
Sept. 10, 17, 24 and Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

Description
Can all fictional literature be attributed to a set number of basic plots? Do patterns in characters determine their decisions and actions? This course offers an in-depth analysis of the elements of story. We will look at Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey, Carl Jung’s work on personality archetypes, and examine a variety of master story plots and several interpretations of fictional character archetypes from books, film and television. This class will appeal to readers, writers and those who enjoy fiction in other forms of media.

Instructor
Diane Peterson is a retired school library media specialist and is current writing her first historical romance. She has a BS Ed in elementary education and English, an MEd in elementary education and an MAT in educational technology. Peterson reads more than 120 books each year and reviews historical romance for a popular blog. She is a member of the Romance Writers of America.

Simply for the Pleasure of It: Conversational French [8 sessions]

Time
10-11:30 a.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
Sept. 10, 17, 24 and Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

Description
Are you able to speak French enough to be chatty — at a level somewhere between beginner and fluent? Exercise your acquired French skills, play along with enthusiasts, strut vocabulary and gesture with the best of this lighthearted, delightful enclave. You will read, act out and discuss passages from French literature, examine themes, imagine new endings, and generally immerse yourself in the French language. Some topics will be purely fun, and others will goad you to serious communication, tout en Francais, bien sur!

Instructor
Aline Kultgen is a retired French teacher for Columbia Public Schools.

Why Do We Wear Clothes? [8 sessions]

Time
10:30 a.m.-noon

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 10, 17, 24 and Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

Description
This course will be an eight-week perusal of the semiotics, the study of signs and symbols, of fashion; what they mean and how they relate to the things or ideas to which they refer. “From caveman to Paris Hilton” is how the instructor describes the sweep of the course content. Why, when mankind got upright, did they decide to don clothing? Climate? Not necessarily and not in all regions. And, how did religion change people’s look — their silhouette?

Instructor
As a costume design professor for over 40 years, Patti Doyle became a seamstress at 5 years old. She dressed her dolls in costumes from the many countries about which she had read. She loved to work with cloth, needle and thread. By the time Doyle was in high school, she discovered that she was not meant to be on the stage. She hated acting class, was scared on stage and felt the stage was a waste of time. Her story was to be told in cloth with needles and pins and measuring tape. Doyle’s designs and costumes have dazzled theatergoers in Columbia for 40 years.

Exploring iPads and iPhones [8 sessions]

Time
11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Location
Hillcrest C

Dates
Sept. 10, 17, 24 and Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

Description
This course is only open to individuals that have already taken Till’s iPad and iPhone class in the past. Some students have found taking the iPad course more than once useful, gaining more insight every time. Some may find the course valuable after a third or fourth time but would rather not sit through the information that they have already absorbed. The focus of this class is for those who wish to further explore their devices without having to rehash the basics. Warning: there will be no structured classes. Students will come to share their problems and wishes and we will explore each on an individual basis. The instructor sees this as a group explorative process. Till plans on guiding students to the resolution of their wishes, but he also hopes for interaction from the class and shared insight and instruction. This is meant to help individuals troubleshoot and get even more comfortable with their devices. Ideal for Premier members who just want a little more from their devices!

Instructor
Till Rosenberger, BS, MS, is the assistant director of Osher at Mizzou.

Ethics and the News Media [8 sessions]

Time
1-2:30 p.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
Sept. 10, 17, 24 and Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

Description
Be prepared to discuss ethical issues faced by reporters, editors and broadcasters on a daily basis. Consider the questions they must answer when deciding whether to publish or broadcast information about news events. Are these questions of ethics, taste or the law? What are the audience considerations? Participants will be presented with scenarios of actual events, then asked, “If you were the editor or decision-maker, what would you do? Why?”

Instructor
Rod Gelatt is a professor emeritus of journalism at MU, the former Chair of Broadcast News Department, moderator-producer of Missouri Forum (TV) and Views of the News (KBIA), and instructor for University of Arizona OLLI program in Green Valley, Ariz. Enrollment is limited to 16 students.

Introduction to Traditional Scrapbooking [8 sessions]

Time
1:15-2:45 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 10, 17, 24 and Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

Description
Are you wondering what to do with all those photos stored in old shoe boxes? Are you concerned about their deterioration as they grow older and start to look blurry and yellowed? Do you want to enjoy them more frequently, while preserving their clarity and color? Scrapbooking is a way to both enjoy and preserve treasured memories for current and future generations. In this class, you will learn the elements of scrapbooking and how to begin a scrapbook. You will be introduced to the tools of the trade, learn the basics of photo organization and become familiar with the fundamentals of building a page layout. You will discover why scrapbooking is more than just a hobby. It’s a tool for memory preservation that will last for generations. This fee will allow each student to create two complete scrapbooking pages. Start digging out those photos of your precious memories!

Instructor
Jill Overton, MEd, has been avidly scrapbooking for the past 21 years and calls it her passion. She has been a consultant for Creative Memories since 2006, which has now restructured into Ahni and Zoe. Overton was also an English teacher for 18 years and now works at the Hillcrest Community Center as an office assistant for Parks and Recreation. Overton also owns My Dinner Taxi — a restaurant delivery service — with her husband Tim.

Thursdays

Energy Medicine — Reconnecting Body, Mind and Spirit [6 sessions]

Time
9-10:30 a.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 18, 25 and Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23

Description
A Western-trained physician meets the healing traditions of the East, focusing on how to increase your longevity, happiness and zest for life. This course is about more than diet and exercise to keep you fit and your mind sharp. This is an interactive class.

We will reconnect body, mind and spirit in each session though gentle stretching, energy techniques and stress relaxation exercises. We also will explore the healing power of sound and creativity, and easy ways to tap into your higher levels of consciousness to reach the peace and joy that are your birthright. This beginning course will be offered in the fall semester, which will give you the background needed to take the advanced course in the spring semester. The contents of the advanced course will change each year.

Bibliography
In response to students' requests, the instructor takes pleasure in sharing information about some of the books she cites in her presentations:

  • Roizen, M.F., and Oz, M.C. (2007).  You Staying Young: The Owner’s  Manual for Extending Your Warranty.  New York: Free Press. Lifelong  Learning Institute 15
  • Eden, D., with Feinstein, D. (2008). Energy Medicine: Balancing Your Body’s Energies for Optimal Health, Joy and Vitality. New York: Tarcher.
  • Wahls, T.L. (2010). Minding My  Mitochondria, 2nd ed. Iowa City, Iowa: TZ Press, L.L.C.
  • Gaynor, M.L. (2002). The Healing Power of Sound. Boston: Shambhala.
  • Bolte Taylor, J. (2009). My Stroke of Insight. New York: Plume.
  • Goswami, A. (2014). Quantum Creativity,  Think Quantum be Creative, Hay House Inc,
  • Feinstein, D., Eden, D., and Craig, G. (2005). The Promise of Energy Psychology: Revolutionary Tools for Dramatic Personal Change. New York: Tarcher.
  • Tolle, E. (2004). The Power of Now and A New Earth. Novato, Calif.: New World Library.
  • Tan, C.-M. (2012). Search Inside  Yourself: The Unexpected Path to  Achieving Success, Happiness (and  World Peace). New York: Harper One.

Instructor
Karen Onofrio, MD, artist and former pathologist, continues to deepen her knowledge and understanding of the human body and the human spirit. She is an Eden Energy Medicine Certified Practitioner, Authorized Energy Medicine for Women Class instructor, Usui Reiki Level 1 Certified, a Free Soul instructor and a HealthRhythms trained facilitator. A $10 materials fee will be added to the course registration fee to cover materials.

iPads and iPhones: A Workshop Exclusively for Apple iOS Devices [5 sessions]

Time
10 a.m.-noon

Location
Hillcrest C

Dates
Sept. 25 and Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23

Description
This course is a series of four workshops that will facilitate greater literacy in the use of iPhones and iPads in an easygoing environment, and a fifth session that will be a more open and casual troubleshooting section guided by students’ current interests or problems. Questions will be addressed within the 120-minute time frame allotted for each session.

Equipment will NOT be provided. Each student is required to bring his or her own device and already have some experience and familiarity with it. Instruction is limited to Apple iPhones and iPads, preferably with iOS 7 installed. Those using earlier operating systems will not benefit as much, as classes are tailored to iOS7. This course does NOT cover laptops, Windows phones, Windows tablets, Blackberry phones or Android devices.

Instructor
Till Rosenberger, BS, MS, is the assistant director of Osher at Mizzou.

The 2014 Elections — Obama, Tea Party, Koch Brothers and Other Provocative Topics [7 sessions]

Note
Course is limited to 16 students

Time
10:30-11:30 a.m.

Location
Moss B

Dates
Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 and Nov. 6

Description
Are you dismayed and disgusted by politics in Washington, D.C., and Jefferson City? (If not, are you paying attention?) Do you look back with nostalgia at politics in the good old days? Remember that the good old days included the impeachment and resignation of Richard Nixon, the war in Vietnam and its protests, and the riots and fires in Watts and many other areas. David Leuthold, professor emeritus of political science at MU, will offer perspective on this year’s elections and political scene, building on popular courses he has offered since 2010. As in previous courses, Leuthold will examine state and national politics and try to provide clear analyses of the most important issues facing the electorate, including the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid expansion, government spending and taxation, recovery from the Great Recession, relations with Russia, the Middle East and East Asia, and military intervention.

Instructor
David Leuthold is a professor emeritus of political science at MU.

Travels With Sharon (Kinden) — New Travels [8 sessions]

Time
10-11:30 a.m.

Dates
Sept. 11, 18, 25 and Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

Location
MOREnet

Note
This is an out-state offering, held at MOREnet Headquarters in Columbia. MOREnet is located just off Interstate 70 in the Shoppes at Stadium. Use the North entrance on the second floor right above Jazz and Ulta Beauty. Elevator provided.

221 N. Stadium Blvd, Suite 201
Columbia, MO 65203
http://www.more.net/content/find-morenet

Description

  • Yunnan Province, China: With its deep spirituality and sweeping scenic vistas, many claim that Yunnan Province is the legendary land of Shangri- La. You will see a fort seemingly made of stone in Kunming, discover the Bai culture in the walled city of Cali, and explore the splendor of Lijiany, home of to one of the best-preserved Old Towns in China. France: Visit the D-Day beaches and World War II American Military Cemetery of Normandy and cruise the Seine to Paris with stops at the homes of Monet and Van Gogh.
  • Myanmar (Burma) and Laos: Though still recovering from the ancillary devastation from constant American bombing during the Vietnam War, Laos is filled with warm and loving people. A century ago, Rudyard Kipling described Burma as a place “quite unlike any land you know about.” Isolated from the world in the recent past, Burma — now known as Myanmar — remains a magical destination, yet one shrouded in history.
  • Spain: You will see why Spain conjures images of rocky plains and whitewashed villages, majestic cathedrals and simple homes designed by Antoni Gaudi, and rugged castles. You’ll get acquainted with the windmills that taunted Don Quixote, bullfighting rings, the influence of the Moors, the strum of guitar and fiery flamenco dancing. Portugal: You will discover Portugal’s bold explorers, colorful ceramics and close ties to the sea.

Instructor
Sharon Kinden was raised on a farm in northeastern South Dakota and attended a one-room schoolhouse. As the only student in her grade, she had ample time to read about intriguing places. She never dreamed she would actually get to touch exotic places like the Pyramids of Giza, the Taj Mahal or Angkor Wat. Coming face-to-face with mortality in 1997 when her beloved husband died of ALS-Lou Gehrig’s disease, she changed her priorities and started traveling. Kinden has since visited 67 countries and all seven continents. Known as a master travelogue writer and photographer, she is bringing her talents to OLLI.

Higher Heresy: The Bible and Modern Scholarship [8 sessions]

Time
1:30-3 p.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 11, 18, 25 and Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

Description
This course is about a book that is not a book. The book is really an anthology of diverse writings from diverse times and writers, in diverse languages, of diverse genres. It contains legends and myths, boring lists of genealogies, various law codes, contradictory stories, declarations of peace and mind-numbing violence, wisdom and nonsense. It is also a fluid anthology, patched together, rewritten, redacted and never agreed upon, from roughly 800 B.C.E. to the present.

We refer to this book as the Bible, but even this title is somewhat misleading and doesn’t capture the shifting nature of the texts. The word “Bible,” singular, comes from the Greek “ta biblia,” plural for “the books,” which is how Greek-speaking Jews of Alexandria referred to Judaism’s sacred history. And yet — even today — this odd collection of ancient texts is probably the most important book in the history of Western Civilization. Modern biblical scholarship understands the Bible as the product of human writers who lived in times and places far removed from our own. Recent archaeological discoveries, cultural studies, sociology, linguistics and historical insights have profoundly altered our understanding of the Bible and how it came to be. In this course, we will examine a small sample of these texts from the perspective of modern scholarship — a bit of philosophy and a gentle dose of heresy.

Instructor
Anthony Alioto, PhD, is a religious studies and philosophy professor and the Althea and John A. Schiffman Endowed Chair in Ethics at Columbia College.

Fridays

Potpourri of the Arts

Time
9:30-11 a.m.

Location
Moss A

Dates
Sept. 12, 19, 26 and Oct. 3, 10, 15, 24, 31

  • Sept. 12
    Photography
    • Description
      This class will focus primarily on fiber art depicted in art. The instructor will include photo examples from her travels.
    • Instructor
      Julie Youmans has a BA in English. Since retirement, she’s devoted her time to art and has worked in ceramics, photography, tile and tile murals, fiber arts and sculpture
  • Sept. 19
    Creating the Chapel Paintings for Our Lady of Lourdes Church
    • Description
      This class will begin in Flanagan Hall at Our Lady of Lourdes Church as we talk about the evolution of the creative process from blank walls to four finished Chapel paintings. We’ll view drawings, color studies, photographs and reference material to discuss their inspirations and symbolism. We will then walk across the hall to the main church and chapel to look at the actual paintings. There will be plenty of time for questions and answers. We are delighted and grateful that our class can be held at Our Lady of Lourdes Church, 903 Bernadette Drive, Columbia, MO 65203. The church is next to Commerce Bank. For directions to the church, see http://www.ourladyoflourdes.org.
    • Instructor
      Karen R. Onofrio, self-taught artist and retired pathologist, has taught classes in artistic anatomy for Osher and the National Oil and Acrylic Painters’ Society.
  • Sept. 26
    Tracing Art History
    • Description
      In this class, you will uncover the art historical amalgamations the instructor has used in his past and current works, and how the process unveils the myths of originality.
    • Instructor
      David Spear has a BFA from the University of Missouri-St. Louis and an MFA in painting from University of Missouri. In Columbia, Mo., he is best known for his works on display at Addison’s and Sophia’s restaurants, his triptych at Memorial Union or his large landscape paintings in the entryways of Boone Hospital. He has been voted Columbia’s best visual artist four times and continues to live and work in Columbia as a professional artist, an adjunct professor, a husband and father of three. For more information, visit http://www.alleywayarts.com.
  • Oct. 3
    The Art of Batik
    • Description
      Batik is both an art and a craft, and it is becoming more popular and well known in the West. The art of decorating cloth in this way, using wax and dye, has been practiced for centuries. In Java, Indonesia, batik is part of an ancient tradition, and some of the finest batik cloth in the world is still made there. The word batik originates from the Javanese tik and means “to dot.”
    • Instructor
      Born in Tehran, Iran, Farah Nieuwenhuizen is former art teacher at Hickman High School. She has taught art at MU and currently teaches online courses for University of Missouri High School.
  • Oct. 10
    Mariel’s Muse: Sights and Sounds Open the Frame
    • Description
      This class will discuss painting and landscape, as artist Mariel Stephenson sees them: “Given my love of landscapes, watercolor seemed the way to go. My love of nature leads me to the creeks and rivers of Columbia and nearby communities. Life abounds in these quiet riparian zones and is often overlooked. No matter where I travel around this country and Europe, I find myself drawn to the woods and the water. Pausing there leads me to the paintings.”
    • Instructor
      Mariel Stephenson holds a BA from Bennington College in Vermont and MFA in art from the University of Missouri. She grew up with art all around her, learning the history of the world through arts over the ages. Stephenson has worked in oils, printmaking and wood sculpture, but moving to Columbia brought a greater appreciation of mid-Missouri landscapes. See her art at http:// intersectkbia.weebly.com/artwork.html.
  • Oct. 17
    Access Arts
    • Description
      The School of Service began in 1971, and has grown steadily since, evolving into the thriving Access Arts program of today. Its mission is to provide creative learning experiences for everyone. Access Arts offers instruction in a variety of art media, with an emphasis on serving those who are underserved. All are welcome in our studios, from the beginner to the advanced artist. Their mission is to reach as many people as possible through various avenues:
      • More than 200 classes scheduled throughout the year using a range of media, including clay, fibers, painting, drawing, sculpture, photography and printmaking
      • Programs for people of all ages, financial circumstances, ability levels and ethnic backgrounds
      • Multiple workshops offered throughout the year at locations throughout the community
      • Free art demonstrations at area events and local art festivals
      • Summer Camp and School’s Out Programs for school-age children
      • Handicap-accessible studios and specialized equipment for those with special needs
    • Instructor
      Shawna Johnson, executive director of Access Arts, has a BFA from the University of Missouri, and has worked as a studio and gallery manager and administrator with different arts organizations in both Columbia, Mo., and New York.
  • Oct. 24
    Seeing Through an Artist’s Eyes
    • Description
      Do artists see things differently from the rest of us? Could any of us look at the world with an artist’s eyes? Explore these thoughts and more in this session about looking for colors and patterns, values and shapes in the world around us. You’ll look at the photos the instructor takes as she travels the roads of Missouri and Kansas and some of the paintings she has created based on these images, as we hear her story of becoming an artist later in life and how it changed the way she views the world around her. She’ll also illustrate her approach to using watercolors to interpret the landscape with a painting demonstration in class.
    • Instructor
      Columbia artist and musician Marilyn Cummins is the owner of Invincible Summer Studios at Orr Street Studios, in addition to being the president of Cummins Consulting, her freelance writing, marketing and photography business. She has always loved making art but marks the beginning of calling herself an artist of seven years ago when local artist Joel Sager became her teacher and mentor. Her landscape paintings are in the permanent collection of Boone County Bank, outside patient rooms in the Boone Hospital Tower and in the homes of art collectors across the country. Cummins is also a vocal and instrumental musician, appearing most recently on string bass in the bass/piano on-stage duo accompanying the musical “Forever Plaid” at Columbia College. This will be her fourth time sharing her talents with the wonderful students at Osher.
  • Oct. 31
    Paulette’s Dolly Boutique
    • Instructor
      Paulette Fick has been a seamstress for years. She creates wonderful ensembles for 18-inch dolls such as the American Girl Doll. You’ll want to bring some spending money if you have interested granddaughters or are a doll collector yourself!

Updated 10/21/14