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Details

All Osher at Mizzou courses will meet at the Moss Building about 1/3 mile from the Stadium/Old Highway 63 intersection. Turn on Hillcrest Drive. The Moss Building (Osher at Mizzou) and the Hillcrest Community Center will be on the left. The Moss Building entrance is located on the east side. Parking is conveniently located.

As a registered student in our program, you may request a library card for use in the MU Libraries. Should you wish a library card, please apply through our office.

If the Columbia School System cancels classes, the Osher classes, too, will not meet on that day.

Contact Osher at Mizzou

Email learnforlife@missouri.edu
Call 573-882-2585.

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Mondays

A Potpourri of Critical Issues; 8 sessions

Dates
March 10, 17, 31; April 7, 14, 21, 28; May 5 [No class March 24, Spring Break]

Time
9:30 to 11 a.m.

Location
Room D

  • March 10
    Issues of Importance: Perspectives of an Impressively Talented Columbia Daily Tribune Reporter
    • Descriptions
      Her writing is laden with imagery, energy and audacity — a pleasure to read and enjoy in Sunday’s Ovation section. On occasion it seems as if her reporting fills the section’s many pages. You are very likely to find pleasure in experiencing the dynamic Ms Wilder in person!
    • Instructor
      Amy Wilder, writer and reporter for the Columbia Daily Tribune
  • March 17
    MU Scientist’s Drug Development: A Refinement in Cancer Abatement Therapy
    • Descriptions
      We present the work of a Mizzou scientist, Professor Ken Gruber, to share with you an example of the research quietly progressing on the MU campus. In this instance, the research is an advancement on the treatment of cancer Dr. Gruber has devised as a refinement in cancer treatment, one that promises to attenuate the iatrogenic aspects of aggressive abatement programs frequently required in malignant disease. You will learn more than critically important research findings. Certainly, the collaborative network Gruber established with the MU School of Veterinary Medicine which will conduct clinical trials of the drug he developed is a model of the new emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration at MU — the theme that is the central thrust of “Mizzou Advantage.” The fact that the scientist’s drug development was accomplished within the auspices of the MU Life Sciences Business Incubator at Monsanto will provide an interesting example of the integrative health and medical community that has grown at MU in recent years. Gruber’s work is an impressive validation of the Incubator’s economic development thrust. Consider the fact that a Mizzou scientist, such as Gruber, may impact our own well-being one day on the outside chance that it should be necessary to attenuate the phenomenon of Cachexia, a destructive wasting away of the body’s tissue secondary to chemotherapy.
    • Instructor
      Kenneth Gruber, MU adjunct professor, Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center
  • March 31
    Are the By-Products of ‘Fracking’ Harmful to Your Health? Answers may emerge from the research of a Mizzou Scientist
    • Descriptions
      “Chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking’ a controversial method of extracting natural gas from underground, can disrupt human immune function” is the research finding emanating from the shop of Nagel. “Fracking includes blasting millions of gallons of water combined with a cocktail of more than 750 different chemicals through rock formations to release natural gas. The researchers say more than 100 of those ingredients are known or suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals that have been linked to negative health effects such as increased risk of cancer, low fertility rates and decreased sperm quality.”
      Source: The Columbia Daily Tribune, Dec. 16, 2013, page 1. Join us to learn the details of this important research from the very Scientist conducting the study.
    • Instructor
      Susan Nagel, MU associate professor, Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health
  • April 7
    Increasing Energy Levels with Whole Food and Vitamins
    • Instructor
      Laura Lee Brown grew up as the youngest of nine with two parents who showed her the way to healthy living. After running track for MU, she became a certified personal trainer, whole food cook, and a healthy lifestyle coach. Currently, she is proprietor of Laura Lee’s Healthy Plate.
      lbrown@wilsonsfitness.com]
  • April 14
    Medicare 101 and The Affordable Care Act
    • Descriptions
      The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the federal agency, under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Regional Office staff will provide an overview of the Medicare program. Medicare is for those who are 65 and older who have contributed to the Social Security or Railroad Retirement system, people under 65 who have received Social Security disability benefits for at least two years, and people with permanent kidney failure. This 90 minute session will educate attendees on eligibility and time periods for enrollment; the different parts of the Medicare program including Parts A, B, C and D; how Medicare works with other insurance; Medicare’s annual enrollment period; programs for low-income Medicare beneficiaries, and resources for help with questions. A short overview of the consumer provisions in the Affordable Care Act law will be given including private insurance consumer protections, the recent new benefits in the law for Medicare beneficiaries, and affordable access to health care for all. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is the federal agency of the Department of Health and Human Services that administers the Medicare program, has oversight of Medicaid, as it is partially federally funded, and administers several other health programs, such as the Children’s Health Insurance Program, and most recently the Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan. Now, CMS is also currently implementing most of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act law, including the Health Insurance Marketplace.
    • Instructor
      CMS’ Kansas City Regional Office administers these programs for the states of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska. CMS Kansas City Regional Office Outreach staff who present and train on these programs will present a 90 minute program on Medicare and the Affordable Care Act.
  • April 21
    A Unique Action by the Columbia City Council as it Votes to Endorse the Medicaid Expansion Component of the Affordable Care Act
    • Descriptions
      Discussion will center upon local actions to improve the health of people in Columbia and Boone County, including the City Council's endorsement of Medicaid expansion, the effects of other provisions of the Affordable Care Act, and the CHAMP process. CHAMP is a local health assessment and action planning process, led by the health department with the involvement of many community agencies and organizations.
    • Instructor
      Karl Skala is a longtime community leader and currently serves as the Third Ward City
      Councilman.
    • Instructor
      Mahree Fuller Skala has had a long career in public health, and is now the Executive Director of the Missouri Association of Local Public Health Agencies, a voluntary association of city and county health departments throughout the state.
  • April 28
    The Mayor’s Task Force on Community Violence: An Update
    • Descriptions
      It’s charge is to research violent crime and delve into its causes. At present, the 13 members of the task force have parsed their efforts into data collection in the following categories:
      • Seeking input from persons involved in and affected by violence
      • Procuring police and court files
      • Collecting news and social media accounts of violent events
      • Gathering input from organizations and services

    An all-day work session will provide opportunity for the groups’ presentation of their findings and analyses addressed to determining trends in homicide cases. Focal points of the group include prevention, intervention, enforcement and re-entry.

    A youth survey is in progress. The assessment includes questions on how violence affects the youthful respondents; how often it is observed and what underlying factors are believed to be the cause. The target respondent population is youth age 10 and older.

    We witnessed the Councilwoman’s impressive ideas about addressing violence in our town when last she gave a presentation in our program. She evoked strong responses from Osher students and considerable respect for her comprehensive understanding and compassion for Columbia’s youth caught in challenging circumstances. Osher students requested that we ask her to return to our classroom periodically to keep us informed about the group’s overwhelming task and her sanguine intelligence in leading the quest for understanding and resolution.

    • Instructor
      Laura Nauser, Columbia City councilwoman, representing Ward 5 and co-chair, Mayor’s Task Force on Community Violence
  • May 5
    9:30 to 11 a.m.
    The Restructuring of Medical Education: An overview by our former MU Medical School Dean
  • Background article
    U.S. health care is changing, and it will continue to change across multiple dimensions: a different mix of patients; more ambulatory, chronic care and less acute, inpatient care; an older population; expanded insurance coverage; a team approach to care; rapid growth of subspecialty care; growing emphasis on cost-effective care; and rapid technological change. These changes demand a corresponding evolution in physician roles and training. However, despite innovation in content and teaching methods, there has been little alteration to the basic structure of medical education since the Flexner Report sparked widespread reform in 1910. Looking to the future, medical education might evolve to include preparation for a team approach to care via practical training for multispecialty collaborative practice and preparing physicians to be leaders of primary care teams that include non-physician providers; shorter training for some physicians via flexible pathways and "fast tracks" at each phase of training; cost-effective care in clinical practice; increased training in geriatrics; and "on ramps" and "off ramps" along the physician career path for flexible training over a lifetime. Although the challenges facing the health care system are great, meeting changing health care needs must begin at the foundation, in medical education
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24128642
  • Instructor
    Robert Churchill, MD, MU professor emeritus of radiology and medical school dean, 2008-2012
    His tenure with the medical school spanned 25 years and included a number of leadership roles, as chair and Gwilym S. and Maria Antonia Lodwick Distinguished Professor for the Department of Radiology and interim dean, vice chancellor and chief executive officer for the health system from 1998 to 2000 and MU Medical School Dean , 2008-2012 As the medical school's leader, Dr. Churchill oversaw approximately 650 faculty members, 1,500 staff members and 1,000 medical students, residents, fellows and other learners completing advanced degrees. He also was responsible for University Physicians, the practice plan for the medical school's faculty physicians, and was the school's liaison with its 7,300 physician alumni. http://medicine.missouri.edu/news/0052.php

By Design: Promising Trends and Innovations; 8 sessions

Time
11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

Dates
March 10, 17, 31; April 7, 14, 21, 28; May 5 [No class March 24, Spring Break]

Location
Room D

Description
Using PowerPoint, YouTube and their wide-ranging travel experiences, psychologists Wayne and Carla Anderson will show how designers in various venues are creating a more attractive, efficient and functional world. Each session will take a quick look at the history of a field and investigate the innovators and their predictions about the future.

  • Changes in how we are housed and how living conditions are computer based
  • How Habitat for Humanity is housing the world’s poor and designs for the Other 90 percent is creating new tools for the Third World
  • How what we wear affects how we live and vice versa
  • How medical magic is creating new body parts and designer babies
  • With drones and robots becoming more intelligent will we become cyborgs?
  • How we stand in awe of the spectacular new art museums and performing arts theaters
  • How artists from Rockwell to Chihuly surround us with beauty
  • How advances in technology affect how we think and how we relate to others

Instructor
Wayne Anderson, professor emeritus of psychology, writes a travel column for the Columbia Daily Tribune with more than occasional assistance from his wife, Carla Anderson, PhD, who has retired from private practice.

Researching Your Family History; 6 sessions

Time
1 to 2:30 p.m.

Dates
March 10, 17 and 31; April 7, 14 and 21[No class March 24, Spring Break]

Location
Room C

Descriptions
One of the world’s most popular hobbies is genealogy. You may have dabbled a bit or are already bitten by the genealogy bug. Derived from the Greek, genealogy means the study of family history and descent. Written history of a family is called a family tree or pedigree. We who have been doing this for a while know what an addiction it can become. It starts as simple curiosity and grows into an obsession.

People decide to research their family’s history for different reasons, such as: to understand a little more about themselves and their roots; to give their children a sense of family by providing them with information about their ancestors, where they came from and how they lived; to compile a family medical history; to qualify for a lineage society, such as the Daughters of the American Revolution or Sons of the American Revolution or other heritage societies; or to publish a family history book.

Whatever the motivation, this class will examine the ‘hows’ and ‘wheres’ to research your family history. It is helpful if participants have begun the process and know how to complete pedigree charts and family group sheets — generated via paper or computer. While not required, participants will find access to a computer of benefit since many sources of information are readily available on the internet.

Instructor
Anna L. Martin, EdD, retired educator, has been researching her family tree for more than 30 years. With a BS and MS from Truman University and, after teaching high school history, it was a natural progression to researching her family history. She previously taught a genealogy course at NCMC in Trenton, Mo. and a beginning genealogy course for OSHER in 2012. She continues to write a monthly genealogy column for her home town newspaper, the Trenton Republican Times, Trenton, Mo., and has written articles for the Missouri State Genealogy Society journal and the local Genealogy Society of Central Missouri newsletter. She is a member of the GSCM and volunteers regularly at the Walters-Boone County Historical Society's Wilson-Wulff Library.

What Do You Know or Understand About Climate Change? 6 sessions

Time
1:15 to 2:45 p.m.

Dates
March 10, 17 and 31; April 7, 14 and 21 [No class March 24, Spring Break]

Location
Room D

Descriptions
Data have been collected that indicate activities of the world human population is impacting global climate. Global population has increased from one billion in 1800 to 2.5 billion in 1950 to 7.0 billion in 2000 and growing. Global population places demands on three resources essential to quality of life: Sources of energy, fresh water, and food. Energy use and global climate appear to be closely coupled and the effect of the interaction between these two topics yields a “snarled pile of yarn (multiple suggested solution ideas?)” that scientists need to sort into a number of ideas – “balls of yarn” - that can become solutions to these problems. In this course we will try to “pull” on some of the “strands” of yarn (available information) that can help us understand how we might address these “global quality of life problems.”

Our plan is to present in words what the scientists are telling us about human activities and climate change. How is it possible that burning fossil fuel (coal, petroleum, and natural gas – they are stored solar energy) can affect climate? Keep in mind there will be “climate change deniers:” Among Wall Street financial interests, industrial firm activities, political activists, objections on religious grounds, etc. all of whom “thump” for their point of view. This makes discussing human activity and climate change much like that “messy bunch of yarn” that must be pulled apart into tasks that can be studied in the search for solutions. Join us and let’s see how we might “untangle” strands of the sources of energy, fresh water, and food problem by “pulling some idea strands” to form a few “yarn balls of understanding.” Come and help us make the course fun.

Discussion leaders

  • Johann Bruhn, MU associate research professor, plant sciences
  • Don Day, MU agriulture extension, CAFNR administration
  • Truman ‘Turk” Storvick, MU professor emeritus of chemical engineering

Tuesdays

The Expansive World of Jane Austen; 8 sessions

Time
8:45 to 10:15 a.m.

Dates
Tuesday, March 11, 18; April 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; May 6 [No class March 25, Spring Break]

Location
Room C

Description
Jane Austen produced only six novels in her short life yet the effects of her writing are increasingly evident today. Each of the novels has been recreated on film, some of them many times. The sheer volume of spin-off books, films and television shows is astounding. Fans can buy Jane Austen-inspired jewelry, tote bags and t-shirts. There is even an interactive internet game. Austen-mania is everywhere and shows no signs of slowing. In this class we will look at the many ways that Jane Austen is loved and enjoyed today, including movies, television shows, books, websites and more. Diane will share photos and info from her visit to Bath, England and the Jane Austen Centre.

Instructor
Diane Peterson is a retired school library media specialist who currently reviews and blogs about romance novels. She is a great fan of period piece films and a long-standing fan of Jane Austen. Diane has a B.S.Ed. in elementary education and English, a M.Ed. in elementary education and a M.A.T. in educational technology. She is member of the Romance Writers of America.

The Pleasures of Probability; 6 sessions

Time
10 a.m. to noon

Dates
April 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; and May 6

Location
Room A

Note
This course begins 3-weeks later than the start of the semester.

Descriptions
Almost anyone senses when something is likely (or unlikely) and this sense is no more than an instinctive balancing of what is favorable against all of what is possible — the very definition of an event’s probability. Refining and organizing this sense can lead to some surprising and interesting insights and sometimes a little more security — for example that a positive mammogram means only that one should be examined again. Unlike most mathematics, an understanding and use of probability does not require complicated abstract formulae. The pleasure of probability is found in first recognizing, and counting, all possibilities, followed by some fifth-grade arithmetic, best done with a $10 calculator.

Suggested reading
The course content is drawn from an unusually well-written mathematics book titledThe Pleasures of Probabilityby Richard Isaac. One’s conceptual grasp of probability would be greatly augmented by securing a copy.

Instructor
Dennis Sentilles, PhD, MU Professor emeritus of mathematics

Living With Landscapes: What Are The Stories Told In The Landscapes Around You? 8 sessions

Time
10:30 to noon

Dates
March 11, 18; April 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; and May 6 [No class Spring Break, March 25]

Location
Room C

Descriptions
This class is focused upon the cultural landscape — that is, the environment in which we spend virtually every minute of our lives. How have we created it? How do we perceive it? How do we value it? How do we use it? The Classbook is an Osher collection of writings of mine from a 50+ year career in Geography. There will be lots of discussion and no exams, except of your powers of perception. Notes from Breakfast Creek is a book by Cathy Salter, a newspaper columnist in mid-Missouri since 1994. Both books will be used each class meeting. They will be available at Osher in late-February.

Note
available now at 1+800+288-4677. ISBN 978-0-595-52426-6. Pbk.

Assigned readings

  • March 11
    The Compass of Geography
    In Classbook: Reading the City as a Primary Document; The Convenience of Environmental Ignorance. In Notes, Clotheslines . Pp. 2-3
  • March 18
    Migration and Diffusion
    In Classbook: The Other Side of Discovery. In Notes, Travel Across Time Pp. 182-184
  • April 1
    The Road
    In Classbook: Thoughts on the Road; Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath as a Primer for Cultural Geography. In Notes, Roads Taken, 165-167
  • April 8
    The Lure and Lore of China
    In Classbook: The Enigma of Tachai; The Power of Poetry to Bond Geography and History; A Model is Not a God; Swimming with Mao. In Notes, This Thing Called California Pp. 138-40
  • April 15
    Geography and the City
    In Classbook: The Chinese City: Origins in Ode; No Bad Landscape; Where the Hell is Jake? In Notes, Ah, Paris, Pp. 144-145
  • April 22
    Citizen Geographer
    In Classbook: Apologia for the Irrelevant Geography Student; The Cross Maker; Learning Through Landscape; Geographic Alliances: Be Moved but Not Alarmed. In Notes, Farm Auction, Pp. 4-6
  • April 29:
    Lessons from Geography
    In Classbook: The Essence of Geography; Urban Imagery and the Chinese of L.A. In Notes, Ella and the Great Blue Heron, Pp. 57-59
  • May 6
    Other Geographic Voices
    In Classbook: The Kitchen Telling Room; The Retiree’s View of the Night Before Christmas. In Notes, My Conversation with Denzel, Pp. 193-194. (Author Cathy Salter will be present on this day to explain this essay and any others you would like to ask about.)

Instructor
Kit Salter, PhD, MU chair and professor emeritus of geography

Sketch and Watercolor Techniques with Artist Jerry Thompson; 6 sessions

Time
12:15 to 1:45 p.m.

Dates
March 11, 18; April 1, 8, 15, 22 [No class Spring Break, March 25]

Location
Room C

Descriptions
The sketch and watercolor class is 6-weeks in length,two sessions of which will be devoted to pencil and/or ink sketching. Thenext four classes will focus on watercolor painting, Osher’s computer-driven ELMo.™, a digital overhead projector, will allow you to see sketching and painting techniques demonstrated clearly on a large wall mounted screen. Students will be expected to participate by sketching or painting in each class.

Materials
The course, for the most part, will be taught indoors. Students will need a 2-B drawing pencil and sketch paper, and a few watercolor tube paint colors, such as Cadmium Red, Winsor Red, Alizarin Crimson, Winsor Yellow, Raw Siena, Burnt Siena, French Ultramarine, and Winsor Violet or Cobalt Violet (Winsor and Newton brand preferred, but not required.) You also should buy a 9-by-12-inch or 12-by-16-inch watercolor paper block (Aquarelle Arches preferred). You may substitute similar-size single sheets of watercolor paper (Arches brand preferred) with a sheet of acrylic (Plexiglas) the same size as or slightly larger than the paper for support. You will also need ½-inch and 1-inch flat brushes, and #6 and #4 round brushes (synthetic sables), as well as a plastic water jar. These materials should be available at local art supply stores such as Michael's or Hobby Lobby. Unfortunately, watercolor materials are not inexpensive. So bring whatever you have or can afford and enjoy the class.

Instructor
Jerry Thompsonis a local retired architect and member of the Missouri Watercolor Society and Columbia Art League. His watercolors are on exhibit in various locations in town. To view some of his work, visit www.jerrydthompson.com

Existential Choices; 8 sessions

Time
2 to 3:30 p.m.

Dates
March 11, 18; April 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; and May 6 [No class March 25, Spring Break]

Location
Room C

Descriptions
People at critical times in their lives make choices that affect their whole existence. This course devoted to eight such existential choices. They are crucial in that the way she answers reveal to herself and others who she is and what she may become,

  • She must choose whether to try to live authentically (face up to her real nature and what human life entails) or to accept a comforting picture of herself and the world provided by others.
  • She must choose her way to exist over time. This makes her face the fact that her presence in the world, if not her very being, will terminate some day. She must decide how to face death now, her own and that of others who are important to her.
  • In choosing how to exist during the time she has on earth, she must decide what meaning to seek, in the minimal sense of sufficient value to make her life worth living or in the deeper sense of something that will give her life significance, e.g. by contribution to worthy causes.
  • Commitment to worthy causes often requires faith in the sense of trust in some one or some thing one can rely on (God, nature, human nature, one's country, party, tribe, a messiah, etc.). This requires a belief in the object of trust which may be formed without conclusive evidence of its existence or nature. Should she take the leap of faith, e.g. in God, Nature, America, Mankind?
  • For a cause to bring meaning to a person, she must actually do what the cause demands and for this she must learn what those demands are, either from others or by reasoning them out for herself and incorporating them in her conscience. Should she always do what her conscience commands?
  • A meaningful life requires commitment to other people. The highest meaning for life demands both fidelity to causes and loyalty to other people. What commitments and persons are worthy of these? Examples: faithfulness and loyalty to God, country, spouse.
  • Honoring commitments is difficult, especially if one believes that only nonviolent measures will succeed in the long run and one may not be around when they do. Is the resort to violence ever justified, e.g. in personal life, when the nation goes to war?
  • Living an authentic and meaningful life in the face of obstacles and dangers requires what has been called the courage to be. As a windup to our course, we will discuss what we need to believe, possess, do -- in general, how to live -- if we are to possess the courage to be as we ought to be.

As fodder for discussion we will talk about ideas of prominent thinkers with widely different points of view. These include Mark Twain, Friedrich Nietzsche, William James, Albert Camus, Leo Tolstoy, Jean-Paul Sartre, Paul Tillich.

Instructor
Jack Kultgen, PhD, MU professor emeritus, philosophy

Wednesdays

UFO Reality, Cover-up, and Disclosure: Film Portrayals; 6 sessions

Time
9 to 11 a.m.

Dates
March 12, 19; April 2, 9, 16, 23 [No class Spring Break, March 26]

Location
Room D

Description
Testimony of numerous witnesses, including astronauts, generals, admirals, law enforcement officials, military and civilian pilots, and many respected scientists confirms the following:

  • Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs) that appear to be under intelligent control, and which are capable of speeds, maneuverability and luminosity far beyond that known to human technological skill, have been sighted by millions of people, worldwide.
  • UFO episodes, including very close contacts, are posing international aviation hazards, and raise very serious concerns regarding global security issues, especially safeguarding nuclear weapons and missile silos.
  • The U.S. government, unlike, France, Britain, Brazil, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden and others has suppressed reports of UFO sightings and aviation problems. Moreover, it has implemented a CIA plan of implied threat, ridicule and disinformation aimed at targeting credible witnesses who called for UFO disclosure, as well as open government research addressing the problem.
  • The hypothesis that UFOs are of extraterrestrial origin is accepted at the 90 percent level of statistical confidence as reported by the French COMETA UFO investigative panel. Indeed, Dr. Edgar Mitchell, the sixth U.S. astronaut to step on the Moon, places the confidence estimate at greater than 90 percent.
  • If the extraterrestrial hypothesis is valid, humankind faces the greatest discovery in history — the existence of nonhuman, intelligent, off-planet Earth life forms with interstellar propulsion capabilities. Thus, this meeting of cosmic cultures will inevitably affect every segment of Civilization, including religion, politics, science, technology, health, agriculture — in short, the complete spectrum of human life will be challenged by the confirmation of a greater reality.
  • Contemplation of the effects of the new reality on various Earth cultures and their responses is a critical research/ education assignment for the best minds willing to undertake the challenge.

Films
A six-part film series will address these issues:

  • I Know What I Saw: Governments and Military Officials Reveal the Truth About UFOs
    This film presents testimony of Air Force generals, astronauts, military and commercial pilots, government and aviation officials from seven countries. Their accounts reveal the reasons those involved at the highest levels have chosen government secrecy over public disclosure. The film is narrated, in part, by former Republican Governor of Arizona, J. Fife Symington III.
  • UFOs: 50 Years of Denial: The Government Cover-up of UFOs and Recovered Alien Technology
    Colonel Philip J. Corso, a staffer for President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s National Security Council, speaks of overseeing the corporate harvesting of technology from recovered UFO crash debris of extraterrestrial origin. Apollo 14 astronaut Dr. Edgar Mitchell reveals that the Roswell, New Mexico UFO crash of 1947 was a real incident and discusses the 50 years of cover-up that followed. Command Sergeant Major (ret.) Robert O. Dean, former intelligence analyst, discusses a top secret study concluded by NATO in the 1960s classified at “Cosmic Top Secret”.
  • UFOs for the New Century
    UFO historian Richard Dolan calls for a present-day understanding of the UFO phenomenon appropriate for today’s scientists, philosophers, educators, journalists, futurists, and other thinkers. Such thinking must concern itself with an updated concept of extraterrestrials (ETs)
    and careful scientific research, including that related to 21st Century information technologies such as Facebook, Twitter, You Tube and those to come. Dolan’s bottom line is that UFOs will be of unquestionable importance to our lives and to posterity. Thus, professionals of every stripe, and citizens worldwide, must wield the conceptual tools with which to understand the subject.
  • The Secret Evidence: We Are Not Alone
    This film presents the story of how leaked documents prove that the United States has been recovering crashed unidentified flying objects often known as flying saucers since 1941, and has been successful in keeping this information from the public. These documents have been examined using forensic techniques and are declared genuine by those who examine the subtleties of paper, ink age, watermark, type fonts, classification stamps and markings.
    The central basis of the documentary is the content of the documents and the amazing story they tell. This program also provides an anecdotal account of the first U.S. crash in Cape Girardeau, Missouri in 1941. Supportive positions concerning the reality of UFOs are also provided by Astronaut Edgar Mitchell, physicist Stanton Friedman, and UFO researchers Timothy Good and Michael Lindemann. Some dissenting views are also presented. In addition to the film, there will be a discussion of the positions of UFO skeptics Carl Sagan, Philip Klass, James Oberg, Robert Sheaffer, David Morrison, Donald Menzel and others.
  • About UFOs and Nuclear Weapons
    Although most people are completely unaware of its' existence, the UFO-Nukes Connection is now remarkably well-documented. U.S. Air Force, FBI, and CIA files declassified via the Freedom of Information Act establish a convincing pattern of UFO activity extending back to December 1948. To date, researcher Robert Hastings has interviewed more than 130 military veterans who were involved in various UFO-related incidents at U.S. missile sites, weapons storage facilities, and nuclear bomb test ranges. The events described by some of these individuals leave little doubt that the U.S. nuclear weapons program is an ongoing source of interest to someone possessing vastly superior technology.
  • Highlights of the Citizen Hearing on UFO/ET Disclosure
    This film presents critical aspects off an event held at the National Press Club, Washington, DC from April 29th to May 3rd, 2013. The event titled " Citizen Hearing on Disclosure " featured some 40 witnesses who testified for thirty hours over five days before six former members of Congress, including: Sen. Mike Gravel (D-Lib AK); Rep. Lynn Woolsey (D-CA); Rep. Carolyn Kilpatrick (D-MI); Rep. Roscoe Bartlett (R-MD); Rep. Merrill Cook (R-UT); and Rep. Darlene Hooley (D-OR). Hearing witnesses included: Hon. Paul Hellyer, former Minister of Defense, Canada; Noted physicist Stanton Friedman; Watergate attorney Daniel P. Sheehan; award-winning journalist Linda Mouton Howe; and Astronaut Edgar Mitchell.

Note
Clips of other filmed statements by various individuals will be worked into portions of the six, two hour sessions when appropriate.

Instructor
Bill Wickersham, EdD, adjunct professor of peace studies, MU, and associate of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, Santa Barbara, California

Simply for the Pleasure of It: Conversational French; 8 sessions

Time
11 a.m.to 1 p.m.

Dates
March 12, 19; April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; May 7 [No class March 26, Spring Break] ( —

Location
Room C)

Descriptions
Are you able to speak French enough to be chatty — at a level somewhere between beginners and fluent? This is an invitation to exercise your French skills, play along with enthusiasts, strutting vocabulary and gesture with the best of this lighthearted, delightful enclave. You will read and/or act out and discuss passages from French literature, look at themes, imagine new endings, and generally be immersed in the French language - some topics purely fun, others goading you to serious communication.

Instructor
Aline Kultgen is a retired Columbia Public School French teacher.

Estate Planning: What you Need to Know — and a Whole Lot More; 7 sessions

Time
11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Dates
April 2, 9. 16, 23 and 30; May 7 and 14

Location
Room D

Note
This course begins 3 weeks later than the launch of the semester

Descriptions
To a great extent we are hale and hearty adults, managing our lives rather well. Still, there is no way to slow the passage of time. Yet, we tend to deny that our existence is finite — even suppressing the fact that we are aging. While that’s a good strategy for everyday life it may trick us into failing to attend to end of life details

Mindful of the importance of tidying up life’s details and then getting on with living, we offer you an unusually fine course that gets down to the nitty gritty. It is conducted by a highly intelligent, well-educated and articulate attorney. We chose him for his impressive capacity for candor — ‘a tell it like it is’ style. Chris Kespohl is genuinely knowledgeable and serious and, at the same time, compassionate and quite charming. You will experience a professionalism that dominates delivery of the legal information and knowledge he conveys.

Consider the course an opportunity to bring closure to an important aspect of life that has awaited resolution.

Class sessions provide participants with comprehensive information for managing estates. You will receive easy-to-understand information for organizing an estate plan and the actual forms and materials that make manifest a legal estate document.

There is another factor to consider: At some time in the past, you may have attended to such needs. However, periodic updates insure that changes in relevant laws have not unwittingly left you with an out of date estate plan.

Class sessions will address the following topics:

  • April 2
    Preparing to plan: things to consider before meeting with a lawyer
  • April 9
    All about Wills
  • April 16
    All about Trusts
  • April 23
    Durable Powers of Attorney and Health Care Directives
  • April 30
    Advanced Planning Options
  • May 7
    Basics of the Probate Process
  • May 14
    Q and A on participant chosen topics

Instructor
Christopher L. Kespohl, JD, MBA

William Blake; 8 sessions

Time
1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Dates
March 12, 19; April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; May 7 [No class March 26, Spring Break]

Location
Room C

Descriptions
During the turbulent final years of the 18th century, following the successful battle for independence from Britain by the American colonies and the successful French Revolution (which had, however, revealed unanticipated and horrific transformations and consequences), William Blake both celebrated and mourned the effects of revolutionary violence and the powers of revolutionary energy in the quest for human freedom and creativity. This course will examine several of the works through which Blake sought a deeper understanding of the nature and meaning of the imagination in relation to human history.

Recommended book purchases
Dover Press has published two books perfectly suited for this course. The Book of Urizen (ISBN 0-486-29801-9) is available in both new and used copies from Amazon.com and AbcBooks.com. The other, America: A Prophecy and Europe: A Prophecy, (ISBN 0-486-24548-9) is, unfortunately, out of print, but used copies can be found from the same on line vendors, or others. It is not mandatory to have these books for participation in the course, but they would add to the pleasure and ease of reading.

Instructor
Thomas F. Dillingham, PhD, is a former member of Stephens College English/Creative Writing faculty and professor emeritus of English, Central Methodist University.

Thursdays

The Foundations of English Literature: A Sampling of Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton; 8 sessions

Time
10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Dates
March 13, 20; April 3, 10, 17, 24; May 1, 8 [No class March 27, Spring Break]

Location
Room C

Descriptions
It is impossible to “cover” adequately the foundations of English literature. Yet a focused sampling from three literary giants will be worthwhile and — I hope — both enjoyable and possible. The Canterbury Tales offers, as the poet Dryden remarked, “God’s plenty.” This fourteenth-century work still provides profound insight into the human condition, as well as hilarious comedy. The successful adaptation of the Tales as a Broadway play is proof of its ageless appeal. In this course we will read the “General Prologue” and four or five tales from an edition which prints the original Middle English verse on one page with a modern English rendering on the opposite page.

Although such statements are not particularly useful, most people would describe Shakespeare as the greatest English writer. He was not only a great poet, but also one of the foremost creators of Western culture itself. In attempting to touch on all three genres of Shakespeare’s dramatic work — history, tragedy, and comedy — we will read Richard II and Henry IV, Part I. The former is both history and tragedy and also contains some of Shakespeare’s most beautiful poetry. Henry IV, Part I is a history play which displays perhaps the greatest comic character in world literature — Falstaff--and is also closely connected to Richard II.

Finally, we will read and discuss significant portions of Milton’s Paradise Lost, the great epic of English literature. This powerful poem, a triumph of Renaissance learning, presents the greatest topic of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament: The Fall of Man. It deals with the perennial mysteries of human life, the problem of evil and the sources of responsibility, God, Man, or Satan. The epic opens with

Man’s first disobedience, and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste
Brought death into the world, and all our woe. . . .

Although Paradise Lost deals with lofty topics in elegant language, Milton’s treatment of everyday human life, as in the marital squabbles of Adam and Eve, has the ring of truth — often comic truth.

Any unabridged edition of these works is acceptable. I recommend the Bantam Classic paperback selection of The Canterbury Tales. Inexpensive editions of Paradise Lost and the two Shakespeare plays are widely available.

Instructor
Howard Fulweiler taught English literature and general humanities at the MU for forty years until his retirement. He has written widely on nineteenth-century fiction and poetry, as well as cultural, religious, and scientific history.

Weaving Your Energy Tapestry of Life: an Advanced Energy Medicine Course; 6 sessions

Time
11:45 am-1:45 pm

Dates
March 13, 20; April 10, 17, 24; and May 1 [No class March 27, Spring Break and April 3] [ —

Location
Room D

Prerequisite
You are currently practicing Donna Eden’s Daily Energy Routine on a regular basis and are familiar with the information in her book, Energy Medicine.

Descriptions
Just as the beauty of a tapestry is determined by the depth and breadth of the color variations used in its creation, so are our lives like tapestries full of rich experiences. The question is, “How is your tapestry coming along?”

As beings of light, sound, and vibration, we have available to use a wide variety of ways to weave our energies into harmonious and beautiful arrangements using our unique experiences in life as the substance and ground for this creative endeavor.

In this advanced class, we will dive into the subject matter of our lives to uncover the hidden jewels, pearls, and wisdom waiting to be discovered. Along the way we will meet Beauty, Wholeness, Gratitude, Truth, and Goodness — all qualities of unconditional LOVE.

References for class
Books

  • Energy Medicine by Donna Eden with David Feinstein, Ph.D.
  • The Mastery of Love by don Miguel Ruiz
  • To Bless the Space Between Us by John O’Donohue

CD sets

  • Energies of Love by Donna Eden and David Feinstein, Ph.D.
  • Gratitude, the essential practice for happiness and fulfillment by Angeles Arrien
  • Beauty, the Invisible Embrace by John O’Donohue

Instructor
Karen Onofrio, MD, artist and former pathologist, continues to deepen her knowledge and understanding of the human body and the human spirit.

iPads and iPhones: A Workshop Exclusively for Apple iOS Devices

Time
12:30 to 2 p.m.

Location
Room C

Dates
Part 1
Thursday, March 13, 20; April 3, 10 [No class March 27, Spring Break]

Part 2
Thursday, April 17, 24; May 1 and 8

Descriptions
Till Rosenberger has devised a series of four workshops to facilitate greater literacy in the use of iPhones and iPads in an easy-going environment. The first hour of classes will consist of structured learning topics, followed by a more open and casual trouble-shooting section guided by students’ current interests or problems. Therefore, enrolled students are asked to come to class with lists of questions that are prioritized in importance. Each class session is allocated 120 minutes. Questions will be addressed within that time frame.

  • Course is limited to 16 students.
  • Equipment will not be provided.
  • Each student is required to bring his or her own device and already have some experience and familiarity with it.
  • Instruction is limited to Apple iPhones and iPads, preferably with iOS 7 installed.
  • This course does not cover laptops, Windows phones, Windows tablets, Blackberry phones, or Android devices.
  • The first class session is to be a review of basic concepts. The three sessions that follow are those in which the content addressed emerges from class members’ interests.

Till designed this course to circumvent the differential levels of technological literacy that normally characterize adult education technology courses. He has relinquished second-guessing about students’ baseline knowledge. You will determine what he teaches by collectively agreeing upon the topics for discussion during each class session.

Instructor
Till Rosenberger, BS, MS, is one of our brilliant staff members at Osher @ Mizzou. Till has demonstrated that there is nothing that he is not able to do — and to accomplish all exceedingly well.

Greek Tragedy, Ancient and Modern; 8 sessions

Time
2-3:30 p.m.

Dates
March 13, 20; April 10, 17, 21*, 24; May 1 and 8 [No class March 27, Spring Break and April 3]

Location
Room D

*Note
April 21 class session is at the MU Theatre Department’s Corner Playhouse. The play is offered in lieu of a session on April 3.

Description
What is it about ancient Greek tragedy, first performed over 2000 years ago, that has remained fresh and vital throughout the millennia and around the world? Why do the plays continue to appear on stage and draw audiences? Why do playwrights keep returning to the tragedies and their storylines for new versions and adaptations? We'll consider those questions and many more as we read, discuss, and possibly watch several Greek tragedies and later versions of them.

We begin, in the first two class meetings, with Sophocles'Antigoneand two versions of that play produced in the 20thcentury: Jean Anouilh'sAntigone, performed in occupied France in 1944 and Athol Fugard'sThe Island, set on Robben Island during the apartheid era in South Africa (1977).

We will devote the third and fourth meetings to Euripides'Hippolytusand three later versions of the same story: one by the Roman playwright Seneca (ca. 50), one by Jean Racine (1677), and finally a version by Eugene O'Neill,Desire Under the Elms(1924).

During the second half of the class, we will focus on some of the plays (and later versions of them) that feature Clytemnestra and her family: possibilities include Euripides'Iphigenia at Aulis, Aeschylus'Oresteia, and the Electra plays by Sophocles and Euripides.

Instructor
David Schenker is an associate professor of classical studies at the MU.

Character and Characters: Fictional Figures Who Live on Within Us; 8 sessions

Time
2:15 to 3:45 p.m.

Dates
March 13, 20; April 3, 10, 17, 24; May 1, 8 [No class March 27, Spring Break]

Location
Room C

Description
“Character died in the twentieth century,” according to James Hillman, Jungian analyst and Yale professor. By “character,” Hillman means more than a moral code, the values we attempt to inculcate in the young – good little boys and girls.Instead he means that amalgam of traits and qualities that gives each of us a unique identity, that lets us appreciate people we know (or know of) as genuine, idiosyncratic “characters.” Without this sense of character, Hillman insists, we have been left with the “Ego.” He likes to quote Norman Mailer, who said, “Ego [was] the word of the 20th century.” By Ego they mean not just a puffed-up, self-centered vanity, but the “characterless abstraction [that] runs corporations, — writes the language of official reports, — prefers systems to people.”

Maybe Hillman is right; nevertheless, we still identify with characters: in stories, novels, plays, movies, myths, folklore, even comic strips, ads, and pop literature. Last year, Time magazine focused on these characters among us in The 100 Most Influential People Who Never Lived. This survey identified six or seven character types and highlighted such figures as King Arthur and Scarlett O’Hara, Romeo and Juliet, Atticus Finch, Anna Karenina, Kunta Kinte, Tarzan, Batman, Nancy Drew, Harry Potter, and, oh yes, Barbie and the Marlboro Man. In this course, we will focus on eight types of characters with whom we identify and examine other examples from our culture that Time magazine did not include. Who are the heroes and villains, the idols and outsiders, the duos and John Does with whom you identify and who have influenced your sense of self? Together we will compose our own “Avatars of Character.”

Instructor
Ben F. Nelms, PhD, retired in 2004 after 45 years as an English educator in Tennessee, Texas, Iowa, Missouri, and Florida. He was a professor of English Education at the MU, where he received the William H. Byler Distinguished Professor Award in 1986. He served as interim dean of the College of Education at the University of Florida, as well as director of the University of Florida Center for School Improvement and the UF Alliance. He also was editor of the English Journal from 1987 to 1994. He still reads, writes, and thinks in terms of lesson plans, editorials, free verse, and five-paragraph essays.

Fridays

A Potpourri of the Arts; 8 sessions

Time
9:30 to 11 a.m.

Note
The Arts class of April 25 will be held in the 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. time slot. A fine Brown Bag Seminar will fill the 9:30 time slot.

Location
Room D

  • March 14
    Art Song 101
    • Description
      Without a song the day would never end.

      Without a song the road would never bend.
      When things go wrong, a man ain't got a friend without a song.
      An introduction to the time-honored genre of solo song in the fine art tradition: typically the merging of the arts of singing and keyboard playing with memorable poetry and lyrical music for its own sake. The leadership of the Germans will be fully acknowledged, but the contributions of the French, the Russians, the British, and the Americans will be sampled as well. Prof. Budds will call attention to the importance of language, subject, structure, and historical style
    • Instructor
      Michael Budds, PhD, professor of music, Musicology Department, School of Music
  • March 21
    David and Cathy Barton Para — Live!
    • Description
      Thomas Hart Benton's last painting, "The Sources of Country Music, is the inspiration for the Barton-Para performance today. They will share their insights about Benton’s painting, chat about the great man, as well as play the instruments shown and the songs represented in this historic, prescient work of Art.
    • Instructors
      Cathy Barton and Dave Para give dynamic performances acclaimed for their variety and expertise in both vocal and instrumental styles. Their repertoire and informal audience rapport are marked by a special affection for traditional music.
  • April 4
    I could write a book
    • Description
      You have always loved to write. Teachers and bosses praised your writing. Now you have the time, resources, and life experience to become a novelist. Should you go for it? A journalist who has sold four novels since turning 65 shares the difficulties and rewards of writing fiction as a second career.
    • Instructor
      Carolyn Mulford wanted to write novels from her days in a one-room school. Needing to earn a living, however, she went to J-school and became a magazine editor, editing international and national publications. After surviving more than 20 years as a freelance writer and editor in Washington, D.C., she returned to fiction and to Missouri. Her first novel, The Feedsack Dress, came out in 2007. Five Star/Gale released her first two mysteries, Show Me the Murder and Show Me the Deadly Deer,in 2013.
  • April 11
    An Introduction to the Great Highland Bagpipes: How the Scottish Culture and the Great Highland Bagpipes Are Inextricably Connected
    • Description
      The bagpipes have a rich tradition throughout Scotland and have been used for military purposes during combat as well as in bagpipe bands. Ancient legends about the bagpipes may date to the late 14th century. The Canntaireachd (“chanting”) is an early oral tradition of music notation used to help pipers learn tunes.
      The delightful Heather Foote will perform bagpipes in a number of tunes, including marches, dances, jigs, and the traditional Canntaireachd. She also will share revelatory stories about the pipes. [Earplugs advised.]
    • Instructor
      Heather Foote is a Columbia sculptor and musician. She has a BSN from the MU and worked in nursing prior to beginning her family. She began playing the bagpipes in 2000.
  • April 18
    Sculptures

    • Instructor
      Sabra Tull Myer has been creating bronze sculptures for over thirty years. She is a native Missourian, with master of arts and master of fine arts degrees from MU, she has continued to study with nationally recognized sculptors. She served on the faculty at Stephens College, Columbia, Mo., and William Woods University, Fulton, Mo.. Meyer is a member of: National Sculpture Society, Oklahoma Sculpture Society, Museum Associates, Columbia Art League, BC Historical Society and Missouri State Historical Society. She was a founding member of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C. and is listed in their Archives. She is a past member of the MU Griffiths Society, and has served on the House Board of Kappa Kappa Gamma for over thirty years. In 2009 she received a Distinguished Alumni Award from MU. In February 2013 she received a Distinguished Alumni Award from the College of Arts and Science, MU. She will receive the Missouri Arts Council Award for Individual Artist February fifth in the Capitol Rotunda.
      On the campus of the MU her sculptures may be found in the following locations: the Alumni Office, School of Journalism (2), Life Sciences Building, School of Veterinary Medicine (2), Museum of Art and Archaeology, and the Audrey Walton Track and Field Stadium. Over 70 other public sculptures may be found in Columbia and across the State of Missouri, most notably; ten busts in the Hall of Famous Missourians, Missouri State Capitol Building, and the Lewis and Clark Monument on the Capitol grounds in Jefferson City, Mo.. The Kansas Chiefs have 6 busts sculpted by Meyer in their Hall of Honor at Arrowhead Stadium, KC, Mo.. Her sculptures are also located on the campuses of Central Methodist University, Linn State Technical College and Central Methodist University.
      Currently she is completing an outdoor sculpture for MFA-INC. It will be unveiled in Columbia on March 10, the 100th Anniversary of their founding. http://www.sabratullmeyer.com/images/lewisnclarkmonument.jpg
  • April 25
    11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Note late time slot for this class session.
    "Theatre or art?” “That is the question."
    • Description
      Artist extraordinaire in multiple genres of human creativity, we may be treated to costume designs sketched before our very eyes or a display of paintings in which hometown personalities are lovingly, nostalgically captured in their time or a preview of aspects of the play he is scheduled to direct at the MU Rhynsburger Theatre this summer.*
      James Madison Miller, Professor of Theatre at the MU, has directed and/or designed over 100 musicals and plays for the University Theatre's Academic Season and the Summer Repertory Theatre and has directed and choreographed for The Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre, The Stephens College Playhouse and Tulane Summer Lyric Theatre in New Orleans. Miller's costume designs have received awards and recognition from the Speech and Theatre Association of Missouri and the American College Theatre Festival. http://theatre.missouri.edu/images/people/Miller.jpg
      His work has been exhibited at Lincoln Center in New York with the United States Institute of Theatre Technology National and International Exhibit of Design. Miller has had one-man exhibitions of his designs and paintings in Mississippi, Texas and at the University of Missouri-Rolla (now Missouri University of Science and Technology), at the Performing Arts Center in Jefferson City, the Davis Gallery at Stephens College and the Ashby-Hodge Gallery at Central Methodist University in Fayette. Jim had a month-long solo exhibition of his sabbatical paintings from 2007 entitled Facing Home: Watercolors from Mississippi in the George Caleb Bingham Gallery on the MU-Columbia campus.
      .*The Drowsy Chaperone is a musical with book by Bob Martin and Don McKellar and music and lyrics by Lisa Lambert and Greg Morrison. It is a parody of American musical comedy of the 1920s. The story concerns a middle-aged, asocial musical theatre fan; as he plays the record of his favorite musical, the (fictional) 1928 hit The Drowsy Chaperone, the show comes to life onstage as he wryly comments on the music, story, and actors. The Drowsy Chaperone debuted in 1998 at The Rivoli in Toronto and opened on Broadway on May 1,2006. The show won the Tony Award for Best Book and Best Score. The production of the Drowsy Chaperone will open in MU Summer Repertory Theatre in July 2014. Marsha Miller is cast as the chaperone.
      Performance dates are July 10, 11, 17, 18, 20, 23, 25; and August 1, 2, and 3.
    • Instructor
      James Madison Miller, MU professor of theatre, director/choreographer/costume designer
  • May 2
    Mariel's Muse — Sights and Sounds Open the Frame
    • Description
      Mariel Stephenson holds a bachelor of arts degree from Bennington College in Vermont and master's degree in art from the MU. "I grew up with art all around me; learning the history of the world through the arts of the ages. I worked in oils, printmaking and ultimately wood sculpture. But when I moved to Columbia, I particularly enjoyed the Mid-Missouri landscapes. Given my love of landscapes, watercolor seemed the way to go. My love of nature leads me to the creeks and rivers of Columbia and nearby communities. Life abounds in these quiet riparian zones and is often overlooked. No matter where I travel around this country and Europe, I find myself drawn to the woods and the water. Pausing there leads me to the paintings." http://intersectkbia.weebly.com/artwork.html
    • Instructor
      Mariel Stephenson, Artist
  • May 9
    Ragtime — Missouri’s Music
    • Description
      Our talent rich state ‘spawn’ the Father of Folk Ragtime, John William ‘Blind’ Boone, as well as the Father of Classic Ragtime, Scott Joplin — and his equally gifted, famous follower, James Sylvester Scott. How much do you comprehend regarding the importance of Missouri in the development of the first true genre of American music? Simply documenting the accomplishments of Blind Boone was sufficient for the US Federal Secretary of the Interior to designate the historic Columbia home of Boone as a Treasure of National Significance. Please join us — and come away walking a bit taller. Feel the pride!
    • Instructor
      Lucille Salerno, PhD, is artistic director of the annual Blind Boone Ragtime and Early Jazz Festival. She also directs Osher at Mizzou

Updated 2/26/14