Copy
Use our in-depth articles & resources to find unbiased, research-based answers to many of life's challenges.
View this email in your browser

MissouriFamilies eNewsletter

September 18, 2017

 

QUOTE FOR THE WEEK

“It is like the seed put in the soil – the more one sows, the greater the harvest.”

~Orison Swett Marden

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Sept. 22 is National Falls Prevention Awareness Day

Two women out for a walk using walkers for safetyPrevent falls and maintain independence

Janet Hackert, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist, University of Missouri Extension

Each year more than one-third of adults 65 years and older fall. Of these falls, 20 to 30 percent result in injuries that reduce mobility. Men and women over 75 who have fallen are four to five times more likely to end up needing the extra assistance provided in a nursing home and experience at least temporary loss of some independence. These can be scary statistics as we get older. However, there are many things we can do to lower our risk of falling, to improve our balance and to remain independent longer...

For important tips to stay safe and lower the chances of falling, see the full article at http://missourifamilies.org/features/agingarticles/agingfeature28.htm

Woman doing tai chi outsideHealth benefits of tai chi exercise

Nina Chen, former Human Development Specialist, University of Missouri Extension

Tai chi is a slow motion, low-impact exercise that promotes physical and mental health and relaxation. It is practiced as an effective exercise for health through a series of flowing, graceful, gentle postures and movements. The gentle flowing movements contain inner power that can strengthen the body, improve mental relaxation and mobilize joints and muscles. Tai chi is an especially suitable therapy for arthritis because of the slow and gentle movements. Here are some of the benefits...

To learn more about tai chi, including the many benefits it can offer, see the full article at http://missourifamilies.org/features/healtharticles/health116.htm

Young football players during a gameFeed your young athlete for maximum performance

Tammy Roberts, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist, University of Missouri Extension

Eating healthfully helps an athlete to reach maximum potential. Good stamina and energy are a result of eating healthy meals on a regular basis. The timing of meals and choice of food can also have an impact on physical performance.

One of the most important things for a young athlete to know is that the energy they use on game day actually comes from the food they have eaten over the past several days so it is important to eat well every day, not just on game day. Eating well every day means eating a variety of foods from all of the food groups...

For guidance on what athletes should eat before and after game day, see the full article at http://missourifamilies.org/features/nutritionarticles/nut307.htm

Sept. 17-23 is National Child Passenger Safety Week

Baby in rear-facing car seatCar seat safety

Janet Hackert, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist, University of Missouri Extension

Child safety seats and booster seats may seem like a hassle, but it’s important to know how to use them properly to protect children. Car crashes kill more children 1 to 14 years old than any other cause, so adults need to know which child safety seats to use and how to install them correctly.

Missouri’s Child Restraint Law states the following...

To learn what is required by law, and to find resources for choosing and installing the appropriate car seat for your child, see the full article at http://missourifamilies.org/features/parentingarticles/parenting89.htm

Like us on Facebook
Like us on Facebook
Visit the MissouriFamilies website
Visit the MissouriFamilies website
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Twitter
Copyright © 2017 MU HES Extension, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp