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MissouriFamilies eNewsletter

February 6, 2017

 

QUOTE FOR THE WEEK

“There are many ways of going forward, but only one way of standing still.”

~Franklin D. Roosevelt

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

3D sculpture of heartHeart disease refers to many conditions

Tammy Roberts, MS, RD, LD, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist, Bates County, University of Missouri Extension

February is American Heart month, and many health professionals are reminding us to practice healthy habits to prevent or delay heart disease. The term heart disease actually refers to many conditions that relate to the heart and blood vessels. Three common conditions are arteriosclerosis, heart attack and coronary artery disease.

Arteriosclerosis is also known as hardening of the arteries. Arteriosclerosis happens over time as healthy, strong arteries become thick and stiff from too much pressure. As this happens, blood flow to organs and tissues can become restricted...

To learn more about these common heart conditions, see the full version of this article at http://missourifamilies.org/features/healtharticles/health88.htm

Illustration of heart and EKG readingFollow heart-healthy tips to help prevent a heart attack

Julie Birsinger, former Nursing Student Intern, and Molly Vetter-Smith, MPH, MEd, RD, former State Health Education Specialist, University of Missouri Extension

American Heart Month is a great time to make sure you are keeping your heart healthy. Healthy eating habits, regular physical activity, not smoking and maintaining a healthy body weight lessens your risk of a heart attack. Your blood cholesterol and blood pressure levels are two ways to see if you are at risk of heart disease, heart attack or stroke.

A total blood cholesterol of 200mg/dL is ideal. Your total cholesterol is made up of three parts: low-density lipoproteins (LDL), high density lipoproteins (HDL) and triglycerides...

A blood pressure of 120/80 is ideal. High blood pressure is a risk factor for heart attack and strokes. Some of the ways to lower your blood pressure are the same tips to lower your cholesterol...

To learn more about what these levels mean and how to stay in the healthy range, see the full version of this article at http://missourifamilies.org/features/nutritionarticles/nut115.htm

Boy eating carrotTeaching lifelong health skills to our kids

James E. Meyer, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist, University of Missouri Extension

We can do a lot as parents to protect our kids from ailments that strike typically in middle age and beyond, according to research by Tulane University physician Gerald S. Berenson whose Bogalusa Heart Study has been tracking 145,000 children and young adults over a period of thirty years. “It all starts in childhood,” Berenson says. It’s our “window of opportunity” to have an impact on a child’s weight, height, bones and tooth strength.

Other diseases have their origins in childhood too. Diseases such as heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes all can be linked back to poor habits developed during childhood. As a parent, try these suggestions to help protect your child...

For the list of ways to teach and practice healthy habits, see the full version of this article at http://missourifamilies.org/features/nutritionarticles/nut123.htm

Dried orange peelsWinter is citrus season

Adapted from the January/February 2017 Home Food Preservation newsletter

During the winter months, citrus fruit is a refreshing treat when served with a bowl of hot soup. Citrus fruits are typically harvested between October and June, and are at the height of harvest and most plentiful in February. While citrus fruits are typically eaten fresh, they can also be preserved in a variety of ways...

For many more ways to preserve and use your citrus fruits, including orange jelly, lemon curd or candied citrus peel, see the full version of this article at http://missourifamilies.org/features/foodsafetyarticles/fdsfty101.htm

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