News for employees, Aug. 15, 2008


Missouri 4-H Foundation receives grand champion ham


The Missouri State Fair grand champion ham produced by Logan Carey of Houston, front, sold for $5,000. The ham was purchased by Ron Ditzfield, owner of Ditzfield Transport, left, and Jerry Murphy, second from left, and wife Loretta, not pictured, owners of Murphy Brothers Exposition. Bud Hertzog, center, foundation chairman, and Cheryl Reams, second from right, foundation executive director, accepted the donation. Also pictured is 2008 state fair queen Whitney Wallace, right, who is the daughter of Lisa Wallace, WC human development specialist.Not pictured is Tony Ross, owner of American Compressed Steel and Recycling, the ham's third buyer. In spring 2009, the 4-H Foundation will host a ham breakfast for donors. Frank Fillo photo/Cooperative Media Group

The Missouri State Fair grand champion ham produced by Logan Carey of Houston, front, sold for $5,000. The ham was purchased by Ron Ditzfield, owner of Ditzfield Transport, left, and Jerry Murphy, second from left, and wife Loretta, not pictured, owners of Murphy Brothers Exposition. Bud Hertzog, center, foundation chairman, and Cheryl Reams, second from right, foundation executive director, accepted the donation. Also pictured is 2008 state fair queen Whitney Wallace, right, who is the daughter of Lisa Wallace, WC human development specialist. Not pictured: Tony Ross, American Compressed Steel and Recycling owner, the ham's third buyer. Frank Fillo photo/Cooperative Media Group

Annual conference to feature personal development speaker

Professional trainer and educator Gale Mote describes her position as CCRPP ― catalyst and coach for revolution with a passion for people. Mote, the owner of a Cedar Rapids, Iowa, training company, is one of the featured speakers at MU Extension’s annual conference, Oct. 28-30, in Columbia.

Gail Mote
Gale Mote

Mote started Gale Mote Associates in 1990. www.galemoteassociates.com She has earned rave reviews from clients for her dynamic, engaging teaching style and inspiring message. Her presentation to extension faculty and professional staff members will focus on the power of one and making an impact.

The conference, which takes place on campus and at the Stoney Creek Inn, will feature a health fair Oct. 28, as well as workshops, category meetings and awards.

Details and registration information will be available online in the coming weeks.

 

Nominate colleagues for extension performance awards

University of Missouri Extension Performance Awards recognize the commitment and dedication of extension employees in serving the people of Missouri with research-based education. Awards will be presented in eight categories during extension’s annual conference, Oct. 28-30 in Columbia. Nominations are due Aug. 27 for the

Nomination forms

 

Missouri to host EDEN conference

MU Extension faculty and other stakeholders can learn about their roles in protecting and safeguarding our food and agriculture infrastructure at the Midwest Regional EDEN Animal Agrosecurity Conference, Oct. 7 and 8 in St. Louis. The conference objective is to promote dialog among stakeholders and increase the understanding of people’s roles and responsibilities in the event of an agrosecurity event, learn about available resources, and promote effective collaboration. Conference participants will have the opportunity to discuss a coordinated state or multi-state approach to agrosecurity events.

Hosted by MU Extension, the conference is designed for extension faculty, state veterinarian offices, animal health bureaus, departments of agriculture and emergency management, county/state health departments, law enforcement, commodity groups, veterinarians, zoos and wildlife parks. The cost is $75 per person. Registration ends Sept. 15. For more information, contact Conne Burnham, burnhamc@missouri.edu, MU Extension emergency management specialist.

Midwest Regional EDEN Animal Agrosecurity Conference

 

Gardening field day to make cross-cultural connection

Take a trip to Latin America in the heart of rural Missouri. MU Extension and Lincoln University Extension will host a field day Sept. 20 in Marshall on gardening, farming and Hispanic culture. The event will run 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.at the home of Dona Eusebia Umaña and her family in Marshall.

In the morning, Hispanic residents, including an educator, a farmer and an extension specialist from Lincoln University, will discuss some of the experiences and challenges Hispanics face in rural Missouri. Discussion and demonstration topics for the afternoon include community gardens; building cold frames for gardens; fall gardening; native plants and pollinators; composting; and loans, grants and cost-share programs.

One goal of this event is to increase communication between the Hispanic residents and other community members, including educators and service providers in state, federal and non-governmental agencies.Other participating institutions include the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Farm Service Agency and the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

For directions and reservations, contact Casi Lock, CML136@mizzou.edu, or Vonna Kesel, keselv@lincolnu.edu, or call 573-681-5312 by Sept. 15.

 

MU Extension answers call for nutrition help with 800 number

Consumers are bombarded with results from new studies, advertisements for products to improve their health and ever-changing recommendations about what to eat and what to avoid.

The almost daily—and sometimes contradictory—barrage of information can leave even the most well-informed individuals wondering how to maintain and improve their health, said Jessica Kovarik, a registered dietician with University of Missouri Extension.

Kovarik answers questions for people who call MU Extension’s Show Me Nutrition Line, which is available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The phone number is 1-888-515-0016.

“Nutrition professionals can sift through that information and help consumers figure out what health and nutrition really means for them,” Kovarik said. “It’s important to help people understand what a single study means and doesn’t mean.”

Kovarik said she looks at study details, such as the number of participants and who conducted the research, then compares the authors’ recommendations to those of other studies. When she can, Kovarik mails additional information or refers callers to regional faculty for follow-up information.

Though the phone line has only been operational for a few weeks, Kovarik has already handled some of those perplexing questions. When she researched a question on cooking jalapeño and serrano peppers, which have been linked to recent salmonella outbreaks, she discovered that two federal agencies offered conflicting advice.

Kovarik found that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said to avoid eating both cooked and uncooked peppers, while the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said cooked peppers were safe to eat. However, there were no recommendations on the cooking time or temperature needed to kill the pathogen. Ultimately, Kovarik advised the caller that without time and temperature recommendations there was no way to assure the safety of eating cooked jalapeño and serrano peppers.

Funding for the Show Me Nutrition Line comes from MU Extension’s Family Nutrition Education Programs, which focus on encouraging low-income audiences to adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors.

Though low-income families are the primary audience, any Missouri resident can get information through the Show Me Nutrition Line.

 

Vice Provost's Webcast

Michael Ouart, MU vice provost and director of cooperative extension, discusses MU Extension's Community Emergency Management Program.

Tune in on the discussion with Dave Baker, ag and natural resources program director, and Eric Evans, state community emergency management specialist.

Learn to use photo management software

Meredith Berry, NW regional information technology specialist, will illustrate the tools and special effects available in Paint.Net during the next IT training, Aug. 26. Paint.Net is a freeware program installed on MU Extension computers. The class begins at 10 a.m.

Individuals should register by Aug. 19. Cancellations must be made 24 hours in advance or a $10 fee will be assessed to the registrants’ home county. To register, contact the TCRC host site:

 •  Mexico
   573-581-4874
 •  Portageville
   573-379-5609
 •  Poplar Bluff
   573-840-9450
 •  Salem
   573-729-8163
 •  Jefferson City
   573-638-9646
 •  Kirksville
   660-785-2530
 •  Park Hills
   573-518-2324
 •  Reeds Spring
   417-272-8707
 •  Nevada
   417-448-1212
 •  St. Joseph
   816-279-1691
 •  Cape Girardeau
   573-243-3581

Epsilon Sigma Phi

The membership campaign of Epsilon Sigma Phi, the largest organization of extension professionals, is in full swing.

ESP is the only professional organization focusing on extension as a profession. It is also one of the oldest, having been established more than 75 years ago. Members represent many disciplines and program areas. Individuals who have worked for MU extension for three or more years and have at least a 50-percent extension appointment are eligible

Alpha Tau chapter

Condolences

Condolences are extended to:

•   Judy Poncet, Crawford County secretary, on the death of her mother, Emma Hutchings.

•   Sue Andrews, HES executive staff assistant, on the death of her mother-in-law, Olga Andrews.

MU Extension Insider is published on the 1st and 15th of each month for MU Extension faculty and staff. Send comments to Editor, Eileen Yager.