News for employees, Aug. 1, 2008


Flagship Scholars program taps MU Extension’s local connections

When MU established the Flagship Scholarship for Clark County earlier this year, Debby Whiston, NE family financial education specialist, knew that Dena Eddleman would be a great choice for the full-ride scholarship.

Born and raised in Kahoka, Eddleman is an MU senior in hotel and restaurant management, is the first one in her family to attend college.

Dena Eddleman of Kahoka is one of four MU students named Flagship Scholars. She plans to attend culinary school after graduating Dena Eddleman of Kahoka is one of four MU students named Flagship Scholars. Eddleman plans to attend culinary school after graduating.

“Dena is a wonderful young woman and dedicated student,” said Whiston, whose daughter attended high school with Eddleman. “She has always been a role model to other youths and has provided leadership and community service to assist others.”

The Flagship Scholars program provides a four-year scholarship that covers tuition and fees and other educational expenses such as room, board and books. Students like Eddleman who demonstrate outstanding service and leadership and are the first in their family to attend college receive priority consideration.

MU plans to establish a Flagship Scholarship in each county and the city of St. Louis through private gifts and donations. Eddleman is one of first four students to be selected for the 2008-09 school year. Four counties - Audrain, Caldwell, Clark and Marion - have established Flagship Scholarships, said Jo Turner, MU development director.

Turner said the Flagship program recognizes the unique challenges of rural students when it comes to higher education. Just 24 percent of Missouri residents have college education. Nationally, the rate is 28 percent.

“In more than half of Missouri counties, fewer than 12 percent of adults are college graduates,” Turner said.

That is why MU Extension, with its presence in every county, is a key player in the scholarship program. “The local extension office is the link to the University in rural communities,” Whiston said.

In each county with a scholarship, an advisory committee, including a representative from MU Extension and the MU Alumni Association, will advise on the selection of scholarship recipients.

“The Flagship Scholars program will establish a network of alumni, extension representatives, school administrators and community leaders to encourage students to seek a college education at Mizzou and providing support that students need to attend college,” Turner said.

“By involving local leaders, we’re also engaging them in telling others about how MU serves every community in the state.”

Whiston said: “This scholarship means a lot to the community, and we’re proud of Dena and her accomplishments. She’s paving the way for others in our community to achieve their dreams as well.”

About the Flagship Scholars

The Flagship Scholars program is part of the For All We Call Mizzou campaign to create new scholarships. The scholarship can be used at the University of Missouri’s flagship campus, MU, with no restrictions on the student’s degree, major or academic unit.

Each Flagship Scholar will serve as ambassadors for education and for MU, giving back at least 20 hours per year to promote education and college attendance in their community.

Peer-to-peer contact is one of the best ways to promote college attendance. The more frequently high school students or high school graduates come into contact with peers who have college plans, the more likely they are to consider college.

MU Development Director Jo Turner said the University currently is working with donors to establish scholarships in three more counties. MU Extension faculty and council members who want to discuss establishing a Flagship Scholarship, may contact Turner or Barb Casady, MU Extension development director.

 

Winemakers learn quality comes from careful lab work

By Bob Thomas, Senior Information Specialist

Missouri's wine industry has seen rapid growth in recent years, with many small wineries leading the way. The state has 72 wineries and about 11 new ones open each year. Much of the growth is from wineries producing less than 5,000 gallons a year, said Rebecca Ford, MU Extension enologist. she said.

Kraig Keesaman, assistant winemaker at Pirtle Winery in Weston, waits for his wine to boil as he tests it for sulfates, preservatives that affect how the wine ages. Keesaman and Benjamin Housworth, another Pirtleassistant winemaker, attended an MU Extension winemaking workshop. Kraig Keesaman, assistant winemaker at Pirtle Winery in Weston, waits for his wine to boil as he tests it for sulfates, preservatives that affect how the wine ages. Keesaman and Benjamin Housworth, another Pirtleassistant winemaker, attended an MU Extension winemaking workshop. Amanda Stapp photo/Cooperative Media Group

That degree of interest was seen recently in an MU Extension course on operating a small winery laboratory, a critical step in quality wine production. Forty-eight participants from around the state received one-day training at MU’s Institute for Continental Climate Viticulture and Enology. The workshop drew people new to the wine trade as well as seasoned professionals such as Kraig Keesaman and Benjamin Housworth, both of Pirtle Winery in Weston, Mo.

"We're here to get a little refresher course, to see if we need anything new and just get back on top of our game," Housworth said.

Participants learned the equipment and chemical needs for a small winery lab. Procedures taught included how to measure acidity, dissolved solids and residual sugars. Other instruction included degassing of wine and determining the correct concentration of alcohol in the wine.

The institute is funded by the Missouri Grape and Wine Board, which directs funds from a statewide tax on wine sales for research, education and marketing.

 

UMEA solicits award nominees

The University of Missouri Extension Association will honor individuals in three award categories during MU Extension’s upcoming annual conference.

Nominations for the Meritorious Service, Innovator and Rookie of the Year awards are due Aug. 29. Individuals may nominate themselves or others. Nominees for Meritorious Service must be a member of UMEA and employed by extension for at least five years. Innovator nominees also must be UMEA members. Rookie nominees must be extension employees for six to 24 months, but are not required to be UMEA members.

Nominations and supporting materials

 

New certificate offered for trainers of at-risk adults and youth

Tackling the Tough Skills: A Curriculum Building Skills for Work and Life™ is can now be taken as a Dean’s Certificate program through MU Extension and UM-St. Louis.

The course will be offered Oct. 14-15 to workplace and organizational educators, including those who work with at-risk adults and teens, and employees in the workplace. The registration deadline is Oct. 10.

An ISE for extension faculty is scheduled for Sept. 25 and 26 at UM-St. Louis.

Tackling the Tough Skills™ includes chapters on attitude, responsibility, communication, problem solving and preparing for the workplace. Key concepts in the revised curriculum include improving elf-esteem; the connection between self-respect, respect for others and responsibility; conflict resolution and anger management; the use of "I" statements; creative problem solving and teamwork; the dynamics of change and other issues related to work, home, family and community.

MU Extension’s AgrAbility project helps people employed in agriculture continue working. Recently, the Missouri project was named a 2008 Program Champion by the U.S.  Department of Health and Human Services Administration on Aging. This video news story explains AgrAbility services that help people continue farming.

Program Champs

MU Extension’s AgrAbility project helps people employed in agriculture continue working. Recently, the Missouri project was named a 2008 Program Champion by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration on Aging. This video news story explains AgrAbility services that help people continue farming.

Campaign Blitz

The presidential campaign season is in full swing. It is virtually impossible to watch TV and not be barraged with campaign ads. Politicians spend a great deal of money to buy TV time to get their message to their constituents; however, many campaigns overlook radio. An MU campaign advertising expert says radio ads are actually a better buy and much more effective. Debbie Johnson has more.

Curators approve FY2010 appropriations requests

The University of Missouri Board of Curators approved the FY 2010 operations and capital appropriations requests to the Missouri legislature. The university is asking the state to fund the FY 2009 core state appropriation of $438 million, plus a portion of a new investment plan that totals $103 million. The university also is requesting $624.8 million for capital rehabilitation and new construction projects on the university's four campuses.

Included in the request is $14.13 million for merit salary increases, as well as funds for competitive ranked-faculty compensation to recruit and retain top-quality faculty, an initiative to increase the number of health professionals in the state; and economic development initiatives. FY2010 appropriations request

Personal Day policy change

As of July 1, University of Missouri employees may take personal days in any time increment. Personal day policy   

Still time to volunteer for MizzouCentral

MU Extension faculty can still volunteer to staff MizzouCentral, Aug. 7-17, at the Missouri State Fair in Sedalia. State and regional specialists may volunteer for morning or afternoon shift, or both.

Morning shifts run from 8:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.; afternoons run from 1-5 p.m. Volunteers are needed for both shifts on Aug. 11, 16 and 17, as well as the mornings of Aug. 9 and 15. Afternoon shifts are available on Aug. 10.

Regional faculty are encouraged to sign up as a team. Mileage will be reimbursed up to $75.

To volunteer, contact Vicki Bach.

Take a minute to recognize your team

The Quarterly Teamwork Award, created by the Extension Leadership Development team, highlights teams and their resulting accomplishments to solve problems and improve the quality of life for the people we serve.

The application form is simple and takes less than an hour to complete. Nominations are due Sept. 1. Quarterly Teamwork Award application

 

MU Extension Insider is published on the 1st and 15th of each month for MU Extension faculty and staff. Send comments to Editor, Eileen Yager.