Missouri Master Naturalists

Missouri Master Naturalists

The Missouri Master Naturalist program is a community-based natural resource education and volunteer service program for adults, sponsored by the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) and the University of Missouri Extension.  The mission is to engage Missourians in the stewardship of our state's natural resources through science-based education and volunteer community service.  Volunteers support conservation efforts and natural resource education in the local community.  General information can be found at http://extension.missouri.edu/masternaturalist.

Lake of the Ozarks Chapter

The Lake of the Ozarks Chapter was organized in the spring of 2009 and serves the residents of Camden, Miller and Morgan counties.  For more information contact Patricia Barrett barrettpr@missouri.edu or by phone at 573-369-2394 or visit their website http://lakeozarkmasternaturalist.com/.

Lake of the Ozarks Chapter Newsletters

April 2018 Newsletter (PDF)
First Quarter, March 2017 Newsletter (PDF)
Fourth Quarter, November 2016 Newsletter (PDF)
Third Quarter, August 2016 Newsletter (PDF)
Second Quarter, May 2016 Newsletter (PDF) 
First Quarter, February 2016 Newsletter (PDF)
 

Missouri Department of Conservation confirms invasive Emerald Ash Borer in Camden and Miller counties

Foresters with the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) have confirmed the presence of an invasive tree pest in two new counties in central Missouri.  The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), an exotic beetle that kills ash trees, has spread to Camden and Miller counties.  The destructive insect has now been confirmed in 33 Missouri counties and the City of St. Louis.

EAB is a species of small metallic green beetles native to the Asian continent.  It attacks all species of ash trees and kills nearly all trees it attacks.  At approximately a half-inch long, the green adult feeds on leaves and does very little damage to trees.  However, in its larval stage, the insect kills trees by feeding on the water and nutrient conducting tissues just under the bark.

EAB first appeared in the United States in Michigan in 2002 - most likely imported in packing crates and pallets made of EAB infested wood.  The pest first appeared in Missouri in 2008 at a campground near Lake Wappapello in the southeast part of the state.

Emerald Ash Borer CSI brochure (PDF)