Statistical data

Summary of continuing education noncredit activities — FY 2016

Continuing education unit Number of
activities
Attendance
total
Individual hours
of instruction
Student FTE

This table includes noncredit activities reported through MU continuing education units only and does not include contacts by cooperative extension specialists.
* One other MU Conference Office activity with attendance totaling 1,290 has been distributed among related academic areas and is represented in the MU Extension unit totals in this table.

Continuing Medical Education 1,879 31,779 2,547 241.9
Fire and Rescue Training Institute 637 13,237 10,315 534.9
Labor Education 39 1,007 310 27.4
Law Enforcement Training Institute 67 1,369 2,314 192.5
Missouri Training Institute 421 11,997 1,647 107.4
MU Nursing Outreach 67 2,094 438 55.8
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute 127 2,324 972 59.3
MU Conference Office*        
4-H Youth Development 1 265 14 11.9
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources 14 4,064 280 195.4
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Extension 2 96 28 5.1
Arts and Science 2 113 44 11.9
Business Development Extension 0 0 0 0.0
Community Development Extension 2 57 70 8.9
Education 0 0 0 0.0
Engineering 2 33 74 2.9
Human Environmental Science 2 472 21 12.6
Human Environmental Sciences Extension 3 641 40 39.7
Journalism 3 1,453 16 28.9
Medicine        
MU Administration 10 3,010 158 265.0
MU Extension 9 1,146 76 62.9
Veterinary Medicine 0 0 0 0.0
Conference Office hosted 12 5,724 309.5 523.99
Conference Office totals 62 17,074 1,130 1,169.2
TOTALS 3,299 80,881 19,672 2,388.4

 

Educational contacts — FY 2016

Program area Direct contact total Indirect contact total Total contacts

*Includes FNEP participants.

Agriculture and Natural Resources 63,734 129,423 194,157
Human Environmental Sciences 955,301 565,152 1,520,453
Business Development 19,449 3,650 23,099
Community Development 25,179 75,007 100,186
4-H Youth Development 98,439 190,993 289,432*
TOTALS 1,163,102 964,225 2,127,327

By the numbers

“Educational contacts” refers to how many people extension specialists and programs served this year. Direct contacts refer to participants who engaged in the learning process individually or as part of a group. Indirect contacts include people reached at public events and through the distribution of printed and online educational materials or content. Both offer diverse and effective ways to serve the people of Missouri and fulfill the university’s land-grant mission.

Agriculture and Natural Resources

Agriculture specialists all over Missouri are in regular contact with producers to educate them on the benefits of establishing and maintaining cover crops, which protect soil from erosion and improve soil health.

Human Environmental Sciences

The Family Nutrition Education Programs reach schoolchildren and adults alike in all 114 of Missouri’s counties through classes on how to make better food choices and maintain a healthy lifestyle. In addition to holding adult nutrition education classes, many extension specialists also go into classrooms to teach children the importance of nutrition and healthy food choices.

Business Development

The MU Extension Business Development Program (BDP) helps transform Missouri businesses. From its early beginnings as a small program in the MU College of Engineering to the multi-million dollar host of four major dynamic programs, the BDP has changed as customer needs have evolved. The Small Business and Technology Development Centers have 38 locations across Missouri to offer local assistance, from advising and educating startups to helping existing businesses grow.

Community Development

The Extension Community Economic and Entrepreneurial Development (ExCEED) team fosters economic growth by advising local leaders and businesses on planning and executing development projects that help their community grow and thrive.

4-H Youth Development

In addition to providing opportunities for STEM education and hands-on experiences in schools all across Missouri, 4-H boasts a dedicated corps of volunteers — many of them former 4-H’ers themselves — that helps get young people involved and engaged in 4-H’s myriad programs.